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  1. #51
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    @YWIR @thread.
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  2. #52
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    @YWIR @thread.
    Exactly.

    Sorry OP.

  3. #53
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I was raised orthodox christian, but when i reached highschool my mom's like its now time for you to decide what you believe and I don't believe in god so i stopped going to church. and sometimes i'd go with her but wouldn't take communion because my taking communion you're basically saying you agree with church doctrine, which I do not.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  4. #54
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyli_ryan View Post
    My boyfriend (muslim) and I (christian) were talking about this subject today.

    I was just interested to see if anyone had any comments/suggestions about this topic and how to overcome the complications that could arise.

    Are any of you from interfaith households?

    If married to someone from another faith, do you each practice your own faiths? Have you talked about what you will do with your children? How is it working out?

    If you grew up in an interfaith household, what did your parents do? Do you think they should have used a different method?

    Just trying to gain some information

    Umm, not in this corner sorry, both parents agnostic and i have followed in their footsteps.

    In my experience the person most ardently following their religion would try to sway the other, often times with an Islamic male and Christian female the woman will convert. Ofc not always the case, depends on the individuals.
    I would recommend though, befor bringing children into the equation, that you discuss and make decisions on how you will bring up your child/children in regards to religious beliefs.
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  5. #55
    figsfiggyfigs
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    If it is an issue of serious consideration, I suggest figuring out what both of you want until you both absolutely agree on every little detail you can think of. Find comfort in this, as it will give you an idea of what possible belief-related conflicts can occur. You'll be a little more prepared for issues that might crop up later on, especially those involving your future kids. The more you figure out now, the better it is for you and your family/relationship long term.
    It is more vital to discuss it if one party is close to their faith. Have a discussion on what you both individually want and how you can make it fit and smoothly operate together. This practically applies to every part of a relationship.

    Maybe allowing them to dabble in what is important to the both of you is a solution.

  6. #56
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    I think we can use logic and reasoning to approach what is objectively true. I think we can find areas of agreement in what is reasonable and logical and work from there. Outsiders who agree on what is reasonable and logical can perceive who's ideas are more coherent and thus more likely to be objectively true.
    I agree that logic can be used as a tool, and consistency of thought can be used as a guide... but people arrive at different conclusions using the same logic if their initial assumptions differ. Just because two guys swing the same bat in the same arc doesn't mean their ball will land in the same spot -- it depends on the size of the man and his musculature, and the size of the ball, and the speed of the wind, among other things. Initial conditions change the answer.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  7. #57
    Senior Member The Outsider's Avatar
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    @Beefeater

    If something is good because God wills it, then morality is something completely arbitrary. It would be redundant to say that God is good, as it would be merely stating that God acts in accordance to his own will; and from that it follows that any ethical statement of the form "God wills us to do what is good" is logically empty and identical with the statement "God wills us to do what he wills us to do".

    Now to avoid a state of affairs where everything is or could be permissible as long as it is done in accordance to any perceived understanding of the will of God, one would have to assume that God has somehow decreed what is always morally right and wrong, for which The Bible seems a good candidate. But in such a case one could simply ask what if God has already decreed that lying is morally good and thus wills it that everyone should always lie, and being consistent with that, so would his word be a lie.

    Or do you hold that God is also subject to some moral authority, either internal or external?

  8. #58
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    Wouldn't you say this way of thinking promotes processes that are destructive for individuals and communities?
    No, I would not say that it promotes such processes. I believe that truth and pragmatics make for a better foundation for social institutions, standards and laws than illusion and metaphysics. Illusion is always threatened by truth.

    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    Is it a way of justifying cruelty, where perhaps intervention is more appropriate, even at the risk of violating individual autonomy?
    It is, if you still believe the notion of justification makes any sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    Even if you're right given your worldview isn't such a statement purely pedantic?
    I cannot see why it should.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    How do they compare ends and consequences?
    They listen to their hearts to find out what is desirable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    If I'm talking about Pauly Shore films and you're talking about Buster Keaton films are we both just talking about films?
    Yes. And what is true in fiction is not necessarily true in reality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    Do you believe in laws of logic?
    In the same sense in which I believe in the rules of digestion.

  9. #59
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  10. #60
    Superwoman Red Herring's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Outsider View Post

    If something is good because God wills it, then morality is something completely arbitrary. It would be redundant to say that God is good, as it would be merely stating that God acts in accordance to his own will; and from that it follows that any ethical statement of the form "God wills us to do what is good" is logically empty and identical with the statement "God wills us to do what he wills us to do".
    Yes. That is exactly why I have such a problem with the story of Abraham being willing to sacrifice his son. It seems to undermine the idea of right and wrong.
    The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. Neither love without knowledge, nor knowledge without love can produce a good life. - Bertrand Russell
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