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  1. #11
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    Do you mean reflection as in introspection? I don't think that's gender related.

    The reference to psychology books or philosophy makes me think you mean a kind of reflection that Feeling types are prone to, that of worth, meaning, significance, all in terms of the human experience. Since women are more likely to be Feeling types, then maybe they are more prone to that kind of reflection.
    This.

    I also think men may attempt to appear less reflective because it is often a considered a feminine pursuit - as intellectualism increasingly is. In many societies men are expected to be focussed on action and asserting his strength and independence, not introspection and 'impractical' pondering.
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    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

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  2. #12
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    I think the idea is that feminine energy is more internal and masculine energy more external. Traditionally women are more home and relationship centered, and men go out to work and to war. Females are receptive while men are forceful.

    However, there are people whose sex doesn't match their energy or their gender. So of course this stereotype doesn't apply to every individual, especially since the modern Western world has changed so much.

    Still I think there's something interesting about how the West is said to have become too masculine, too "doing" and too rational (it's very, very Te in the U.S. and UK) and the East is still feminine, reflective, and intuitive.

    So I'm going to say yes and no. Not necessarily based on whether a person has a penis or vagina, but in terms of masculine and feminine energy, yes.

  3. #13
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space Socks View Post
    That is way too simple. Men are not exempt from the pressures of self reflection. Men are generally brought up being taught to act a certain way around women and so have a higher contrast of perceiving the woman's needs and their own. Women are generally brought up to avoid men, until they reach womanhood so the earlier stages tend to be revolved around self image (mostly looks) and judging, so many rely a little more on manipulation than men that are likely to be more straightforward(actions).

    Self reflection requires an outsider to compare oneself to. Men throughout history have reflected on major subjects in philosophy and psychology and have been praised for explaining the big ideas and the actions of humans, but women have taken a bit more caution because of the details that they take account of. So the complications that women see are seen as just as important.

    It may also be that men for the majority of history have had the dominant role as leaders, and women having the opportunity(not really out of choice) to watch men do their thing get the experience of contrasting the outcomes and the motives. With a majority of the population being women, it's no surprise that the amount of information is collected and then taken on bit by bit by women to support other women.

    Ironically, the two genders take on the role of the other in various stages throughout life and history.
    And you mean by looking at it totally complex and big picture classy historical makes it more ture ? I dunno but I liked my theory better. Plus what you described is a very american idealized picture of things. Throughout my history men are more famous for being hard workers who didnt thought about anything like being big philosophers or leaders. Same applies to courting woman as a man. That is a neoclassy british interpretation of romance. Where I come from woman always had a less romantic role and where more valued for being able workers and good providers.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    Same applies to courting woman as a man. That is a neoclassy british interpretation of romance. Where I come from woman always had a less romantic role and where more valued for being able workers and good providers.
    This explains so much.

    @spacesocks: where did you grow up? I don't relate to women acting like that as they grow up at all.
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  5. #15
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    I don't know if this has anything to do with gender, or the fact that I'm an NTJ, but I'm profoundly reflective about the world.

    While I am to an extent self reflective, I'm not very good with understanding my emotions, and thus I don't reflect on that very frequently.

    I do think about where I can improve myself, and my habits, but I usually see emotional changes happening in response to good habits I develop, not necessarily due to any ability to divine any purpose behind my emotions.

  6. #16
    Member Space Socks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    And you mean by looking at it totally complex and big picture classy historical makes it more ture ? I dunno but I liked my theory better. Plus what you described is a very american idealized picture of things. Throughout my history men are more famous for being hard workers who didnt thought about anything like being big philosophers or leaders. Same applies to courting woman as a man. That is a neoclassy british interpretation of romance. Where I come from woman always had a less romantic role and where more valued for being able workers and good providers.
    I didn't mean the gender difference and historical picture that I generalized is true. Just an observation. Of course I missed plenty of other factors, but the majority of women in psychology come from the western world, so yeah, it is a bit americanized.


    Throughout my history men are more famous for being hard workers who didnt thought about anything like being big philosophers or leaders.
    ...and which history are you referencing? I'm curious.

    Also, the op mentioned browsing through amazon books and bookstores that pop psychology(psychology is still very young, thus mentioning women's role in partaking) and philosophy (I'm thinking self help references) written by female authors are generally for female audiences. I see where the op is coming from, and I'm simply suggesting that the roles of feeling vs thinking could possibly have been stereotyped to the gender from larger generalizations. Correlation? yes, if you see it so. Causation? No. or maybe. depends. I don't know.
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  7. #17
    Member Space Socks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    This explains so much.

    @spacesocks: where did you grow up? I don't relate to women acting like that as they grow up at all.
    My father was a refugee from Vietnam, my mother an illegal immigrant from Mexico.

    I grew up in a mixed house hold and moved around quite a bit, but I've consistently lived in the states for some time now.
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  8. #18
    Member Space Socks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    I don't know if this has anything to do with gender, or the fact that I'm an NTJ, but I'm profoundly reflective about the world.

    While I am to an extent self reflective, I'm not very good with understanding my emotions, and thus I don't reflect on that very frequently.
    I'm more inclined to believe gender has little to nothing to do with reflection, but in the field of psychology, perhaps just a little bit.

    Reflective about the world in what way?

    I do think about where I can improve myself, and my habits, but I usually see emotional changes happening in response to good habits I develop, not necessarily due to any ability to divine any purpose behind my emotions.
    I can't tell if it is an NTJ thing, but I have known some that have felt strongly about something and have wanted to act on them at the time, but completely freeze up and don't.
    This particular person in mind ended up pouring out his feelings afterward about what he would've done/changed and really beat himself up for it.
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  9. #19
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    I would say Men are more deep-thinking than Women, since that is more objective, but I would say Women are more reflective than Men, since they are more focused on how they are feeling.

  10. #20
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    Upon their actions or their life?

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