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Thread: EGO and MBTI

  1. #1
    Senior Member Munchies's Avatar
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    Default EGO and MBTI

    So it appears most people here cling to their MBTI type for a sense of false identity. People find MBTI in search of self knowledge, and most people have a lost sense in self and find ID in their given MBTI type. Their MBTI type is their desired self, and is how they would like to be seen.
    1+1=3 OMFG

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    Senior Member Kurt.Is.God's Avatar
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    You know, I was going to disagree, but you might be right on a few things. It is a source of identity for me. And I do think it's a pretty accurate way to present myself (I'm guessing this is what you meant by desired self). When my personality type is insulted or praised, I'll feel that applies to me (which it often does), and I'll cling to the attempts to validate my type. I don't think this is BAD or a sense of "false identity", but I do feel like it NARROWS my self-understanding (to eight factors).

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    One can see a large bit of themselves in a type, then over-identify with it and cling to it as an ideal or standard.

    It's one of many ways to structure or project an identity. It has its utility, but it's also imperfect and can be outgrown.

    We also see the reverse of what you describe--how one's type influences how other people see them. So, it occurs at both ends.

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    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munchies View Post
    So it appears most people here cling to their MBTI type for a sense of false identity. People find MBTI in search of self knowledge, and most people have a lost sense in self and find ID in their given MBTI type. Their MBTI type is their desired self, and is how they would like to be seen.

    Interesting.

    The benefit to using descriptors to explain ourselves and others is that we can understand more information than we could understand without using said descriptors.

    The cost to using descriptors to explain ourselves and others is that we narrow our focus and miss information that might fall outside the pattern or descriptors.

    MBTI is just a descriptor-tool. It is a valid tool for generally understanding people, but it's validity breaks down when trying to more deeply know a person.

    Perhaps a person doesn't want to be more deeply known because they have a low self-esteem or image. They could perhaps hide behind their MBTI type to continue to describe them when, in fact, it does not; when, in fact, it's time to go beyond generalities and assess the individual on a more intimate, albeit time-consuming level.

    So I would agree with you. MBTI is a bandaid for our bruised egos.



    Maybe this also explains why most people who've used (and abused) MBTI shun it as worthless, not even putting a type by their name. It's just that, for, and with, the people in question, they have gone beyond what MBTI can do.




    Still. Knowing a person's preferred cognitive functions could help with understanding them on an intimate/individual level, by giving one insight into how that person likely processes data and makes decisions.


    I cannot reconcile these two ideas at this moment....*ponder*



    had an analogy going but don't feel like elaborating atm. this is getting too long.
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    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt.Is.God View Post
    You know, I was going to disagree, but you might be right on a few things. It is a source of identity for me. And I do think it's a pretty accurate way to present myself (I'm guessing this is what you meant by desired self). When my personality type is insulted or praised, I'll feel that applies to me (which it often does), and I'll cling to the attempts to validate my type. I don't think this is BAD or a sense of "false identity", but I do feel like it NARROWS my self-understanding (to eight factors).
    By extension, will people take it personally when someone insults or praises their cultural group, or gender, or religion, or occupation, etc? I know many people do, and can become quite defensive if the generalization is not flattering. Applying such comments to oneself is valid only to the degree to which one shares the particular group attributes being described. MB type is no different.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

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    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munchies View Post
    So it appears most people here cling to their MBTI type for a sense of false identity. People find MBTI in search of self knowledge, and most people have a lost sense in self and find ID in their given MBTI type. Their MBTI type is their desired self, and is how they would like to be seen.
    Partially agree/disagree. It depends on the person. Some people do select a type that doesn't really suit them because they admire the qualities of that type- it's what they want to be. Not everyone is like this. I've seen people do the opposite. They hate their type and wish they have a different one. Both these groups have something in common- they have overrelied on MBTI type to define themselves. People are complex and type only explains part of it. There are strengths and weaknesses in every type and no type is more inherently better than another type.

    Also, there is a lot of diversity between members of the same type. The strengths and weaknesses of a given type should be taken as a list of general tendencies. There's going to be exceptions and not every member of a given type will necessarily display all of those.
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  7. #7
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    I will also freely admit (again) to using functions and types as ways to 'visualize' myself in different ways and practice personal growth. What can I say? It works for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    By extension, will people take it personally when someone insults or praises their cultural group, or gender, or religion, or occupation, etc? I know many people do, and can become quite defensive if the generalization is not flattering. Applying such comments to oneself is valid only to the degree to which one shares the particular group attributes being described. MB type is no different.
    I'll admit that I can take it slightly personally, especially when it's in the form of "You belong to group x; therefore, you y." The problem we have, psychologically, is that, if we over-identify with the groups and labels that we belong to, then we'll implicitly read that sentiment into every statement about x. We get afraid that people actually do think that way, and that the thoughts of other people somehow affect us.

    Deep down, a small part of me is concerned with the spreading of baseless ideas about groups; and I, of course, have a personal stake in ideas about the groups that I belong to. It's great to be able to trust the critical thinking skills of other people, though; the baseless ideas won't spread to them very easily if people can think about them.

    But I've mostly internalized the idea that the thoughts of most people absolutely do not affect me in any way, shape or form and that there's no reason to get defensive about them. People have opinions; they are what they are.

    I figure that the best way to dispel baseless stereotypes about one's cultural group, gender, religion, or MBTI type is to simply exist. By doing so, you demonstrate your versatility and eliminate the 'black and white' nature of those stereotypes.

  8. #8
    Tier 1 Member LunaLuminosity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munchies View Post
    So it appears most people here cling to their MBTI type for a sense of false identity. People find MBTI in search of self knowledge, and most people have a lost sense in self and find ID in their given MBTI type. Their MBTI type is their desired self, and is how they would like to be seen.
    Um, yeah, pretty much Problem?

    As I've said, if you are taking you out of the equation of your type, you're simplying doing it wrong by definition. It doesn't mean that you are losing a sense of self or that you're giving yourself a false identity, but simplying creating that link between yourself and a more generalized, idealized image. It's not like you guys don't already do it when you look up to certain figures and not others as far back as early childhood.... MBTI just attaches it to 4 letters.


    Oh, but the consequence of this has also been for me being way too overconfident to feel insulted when someone disses my type. And no, even with 4 years of being here doesn't mean that I automatically have to be bitter about this whole personality business. I just change letters in my type and hide it at times out of sheer boredom with it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    I don't think there's enough about it to build an identity around. It's just a way to describe what kind of information a person prefers. What you do exactly is always going to be more personalized.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Munchies's Avatar
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    I think it all comes down to the superficiality of the mind, and attatchment to what their idea of what "is". Clinging to weak supports to support the ideas of who we are. There is no self. Our minds are infinite in possibility, to cling to a singular idea of who we are, is not true. This, is the basis of rascism and any form of generalization. " I am canadian, we are better than americans" " I am a thinker, not a feeler" "I am the best" . It's all the same, it's all fabricated ego. We are all human and the same spirit at the core
    1+1=3 OMFG

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