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  1. #11
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    I don't think greed was the issue.. Or was it?
    Past a certain ammount of money you'd have to worry too much about security (against kidnapping, stealing, etc) - without enough benefits in quality of life to offset this concern. That said, greed would play a role on some choices - more money isn't always the best option.
    -----------------

    A man builds. A parasite asks 'Where is my share?'
    A man creates. A parasite says, 'What will the neighbors think?'
    A man invents. A parasite says, 'Watch out, or you might tread on the toes of God... '


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  2. #12
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    Id pay money to have rich people problems...

    Disagree.

  3. #13
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    I think the biggest problem many people have in getting rich is the shock of realizing that it doesn't make you any happier than before. Then you have to restructure your values, find more potential answers to your lack of bliss, or just try to forget your unhappiness. Wherever you go, there you are.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I think the biggest problem many people have in getting rich is the shock of realizing that it doesn't make you any happier than before. Then you have to restructure your values, find more potential answers to your lack of bliss, or just try to forget your unhappiness. Wherever you go, there you are.
    Pretty much. We adjust to new standards of living and even to new levels of happiness. Classic hedonic treadmill business, right there.

    If more money causes someone more problems, it's because they're disappointed that their money doesn't bring them lasting pleasure, because they allowed that money to increase their baseline standard of living and cause them stress in trying to maintain it, because they're still not satisfied and it becomes more and more complicated to manage, because others found out about it and now they have a bunch of "fake" friends, and so on.

    One can still maintain a simple, stress-free lifestyle if he's got a lot of money.. it's just that many choose not to do so.

  5. #15
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    The only problem with success I've ever seen is this:

    And Alexander wept for there were no more worlds to conquer.

  6. #16
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    The only problem with success I've ever seen is this:
    Success does not necessarily equal money. Success is self defined, or at least it should be.

  7. #17
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    Success does not necessarily equal money. Success is self defined, or at least it should be.
    There is a difference between having personal success, and being successful.

    The tendency I've seen here is to define success in a way that makes it accessible to most everyone, not in the way the world defines it.

    I think that you guys are describing living a happy and fulfilling life, but not necessarily a successful one.

    Success is relative. For all those that get that promotion, there are five others that didn't.

    For all those start ups that find a market need and fill it (capturing market share), there are probably 100 that don't.

    To define success in a manner that relieves it of exclusivity (achievement relative to others), destroys the term's social utility as an incentive for greater competition and innovation.

    Surely everyone (to an extent) deserves to be happy.

    But not everyone deserves to be successful, and in the way you define it, most of the populace would qualify.

    If your definition success is used, if society stops viewing success as a zero sum game, we lose the motivating ability of competition to drive innovation.

    When our kids ask us if they can be president, we say yes hoping that the possibility drives them to habits of excellence and achievement.

    If society considers a janitor as successful as the inventor of the first artificial heart, we lose the incentive to put the time and effort into driving innovation.

    If society respects the achievement of being a cashier micky d's as much as becoming a neurosurgeon, fewer people will become neurosurgeons.

    Thus for me, more money does not equate to more problems.

  8. #18
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    The tendency I've seen here is to define success in a way that makes it accessible to most everyone, not in the way the world defines it.

    I think that you guys are describing living a happy and fulfilling life, but not necessarily a successful one.

    Success is relative. For all those that get that promotion, there are five others that didn't.

    For all those start ups that find a market need and fill it (capturing market share), there are probably 100 that don't.

    To define success in a manner that relieves it of exclusivity (achievement relative to others), destroys the term's social utility as an incentive for greater competition and innovation.

    Surely everyone (to an extent) deserves to be happy.

    But not everyone deserves to be successful, and in the way you define it, most of the populace would qualify.

    If your definition success is used, if society stops viewing success as a zero sum game, we lose the motivating ability of competition to drive innovation.

    When our kids ask us if they can be president, we say yes hoping that the possibility drives them to habits of excellence and achievement.

    If society considers a janitor as successful as the inventor of the first artificial heart, we lose the incentive to put the time and effort into driving innovation.

    If society respects the achievement of being a cashier micky d's as much as becoming a neurosurgeon, fewer people will become neurosurgeons.

    Thus for me, more money does not equate to more problems.
    Fi vs Fe? In anycase, it's a personal choice to take on the idea of success touted by your society, or at least it *can be* a personal choice. I'm perfectly fine in saying that there are two type of success, personal and societal. I know which one actually matters to me.

  9. #19
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    Different strokes for different folks.

  10. #20
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    More money = more problems, yes. Obviously you need enough to make a reasonably comfortable living, but after that you attract jealously and become suspicious (are they your friend because of you or your money?), and more importantly - you can never be satisfied. Success is dangerously addictive, and money is no exception. And since humans generally have a hedonistic nature, you also start indulging on drugs, alcohol, sexual conquests... you're using that money to throw away your health, your friends, and your hope for a family. Just look at celebrities in general.

    If I suddenly won a few millions at the lottery, I'd donate all of it to the Red Cross or something.

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