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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    I understood what you meant immediately.

    To an Fi dom, they've already got their philosophy. It comes from within.

    To an INTJ, the philosophy comes from "not" having a philosophy. It comes from looking at and understanding the buffet.
    +2

    So very true.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Outsider View Post
    Picking a favorite philosophy is something that seems really bizarre to me.
    The reason you are making this comment is from the way I see it, western Philosophies aren't made to have followers.

    Thus the failure of this thread.

    When I made the OP Whats your favourite western philosophy and why? I was under the impression that there must be at least a few follower of these philosophies.

    It seems that almost all Western Philosophies after Christianity revolves around Christianity or God or interpretation of God or denying of God.

    None of them have invited followers but only invited people to accept them.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Helios's Avatar
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    “It seems to me that the regulative idea that we heirs of the Enlightenment, we Socratists, most frequently use to criticize the conduct of various conversational partners is that of ‘needing education in order to outgrow their primitive fear, hatreds, and superstitions’ ... It is a concept which I, like most Americans who teach humanities or social science in colleges and universities, invoke when we try to arrange things so that students who enter as bigoted, homophobic, religious fundamentalists will leave college with views more like our own ... The fundamentalist parents of our fundamentalist students think that the entire ‘American liberal establishment’ is engaged in a conspiracy. The parents have a point. Their point is that we liberal teachers no more feel in a symmetrical communication situation when we talk with bigots than do kindergarten teachers talking with their students ... When we American college teachers encounter religious fundamentalists, we do not consider the possibility of reformulating our own practices of justification so as to give more weight to the authority of the Christian scriptures. Instead, we do our best to convince these students of the benefits of secularization. We assign first-person accounts of growing up homosexual to our homophobic students for the same reasons that German schoolteachers in the postwar period assigned The Diary of Anne Frank... You have to be educated in order to be ... a participant in our conversation ... So we are going to go right on trying to discredit you in the eyes of your children, trying to strip your fundamentalist religious community of dignity, trying to make your views seem silly rather than discussable. We are not so inclusivist as to tolerate intolerance such as yours ... I don’t see anything herrschaftsfrei [domination free] about my handling of my fundamentalist students. Rather, I think those students are lucky to find themselves under the benevolent Herrschaft [domination] of people like me, and to have escaped the grip of their frightening, vicious, dangerous parents ... I am just as provincial and contextualist as the Nazi teachers who made their students read Der Stürmer; the only difference is that I serve a better cause.”

    — Richard Rorty

  3. #43
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Existentialism. In the spirit of Keirkegaard, I mean. I've little time for Nietzsche. While I don't know what the destiny of humanity is, a collective one appeals to me. Nietzsche would rather say strong individuals forge that destiny. This envitably produces far too much curbstomping for my tastes. I don't like the idea of seperating people between strong and weak. It's more complicated than that.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Guardian's Review of 'Friedrich Nietzsche', by Curtis Cate
    As Curtis Cate points out in his diligent biography, part of Nietzsche's attraction is that his work is so varied, so riven with apparent contradictions, that all sorts of people have plundered it to support their special interests and causes. By quoting selectively - as Carey does in The Intellectuals and the Masses - it is possible to turn Nietzsche into a rabid anti-democrat, but not to balance this against the tenderness and courtesy by which he set such store is intellectually dishonest. It was Nietzsche, after all, who thought that instead of praying, the best way to begin each day was, "on waking up, to think how one can give joy to at least one person that day".
    .

  5. #45
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    .
    Ultimately though, he wasn't very democratic (maybe he was personally.. he never thought of himself as living up to his own philosophy.. he looked forward to someone who could). No matter how varying his views are, his starting point was always the individual. Keirkegaard's was more collective and anthropological. He cared about destiny on some grander scale. A mystery to be uncovered for all. Nietzsche is more about one person thinking he knows destiny, and then dragging everyone into it (whether they like it or not.. it'd just be a matter of overpowering them).

  6. #46
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    Yeah. So?

    Beats socialism...

  7. #47
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    Yeah. So?

    Beats socialism...
    Whatever, man. Just getting an understanding here.

    Glad you answered that way. You're alright. lol

  8. #48
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    I don't know if you can say Kierkegaard is more collective than Nietzsche, since his starting point is the isolated individual before God. He showed great concern about how geniune individuality was being squashed in the social mob -"the public". He does leave more room for authentic forms community than Nietzsche though.

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    I'm a Spinozist!

  10. #50
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Nietzsche is more about one person thinking he knows destiny, and then dragging everyone into it (whether they like it or not.. it'd just be a matter of overpowering them).
    Sounds like an insecure asshole.

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