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  1. #11
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    I'm sorry, where did Nietzsche say that?
    In his bed, cared for by the sister he detested, at the end of a ten-year period of mental derangement, almost a year after he lost his ability to speak.

  2. #12
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riva View Post
    In my experience most people who are in to Western Philosophy are INTXs.

    They are not the most keen on teaching an amateurs, especially on subjects such as these.
    A couple weeks ago I was in a coffee house and I struck up a conversation with this man with this stack of papers and a laptop. He was studying Kant, specifically.. studying a paper by one Kant sympathiser that was written in response to another paper about an intepretation on one of Kant's passages. He was very clearly some sort of INTx, and was perfectly happy to give me an overview. But it wasn't so much an overview, but really just an explanation of his specific and current interest of Kant within the whole framework of Western philosophy. I was able to follow for the most part, because I'm not completely ignorant to the concepts, but I did get the impression that I wouldn't get much out of reading any philosopher without starting reading Plato and then reading absoultely anything of note up from there.

    Not sure what I was trying to say there. Umm, I'm sure there's some sort of Cliff Notes on Nietzche, but I imagine you wouldn't really be able to jump into a serious Nietzche discussion after reading them.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riva View Post
    In my experience most people who are in to Western Philosophy are INTXs.

    They are not the most keen on teaching an amateurs, especially on subjects such as these.
    If you want to learn about Nietzsche, you can read 'Ecce homo', his autobiography, which is a review of Nietzsche (work and persona) by Nietzsche. It is rather short.

  4. #14
    Riva
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    A couple weeks ago I was in a coffee house and I struck up a conversation with this man with this stack of papers and a laptop. He was studying Kant, specifically.. studying a paper by one Kant sympathiser that was written in response to another paper about an intepretation on one of Kant's passages. He was very clearly some sort of INTx, and was perfectly happy to give me an overview. But it wasn't so much an overview, but really just an explanation of his specific and current interest of Kant within the whole framework of Western philosophy. I was able to follow for the most part, because I'm not completely ignorant to the concepts, but I did get the impression that I wouldn't get much out of reading any philosopher without starting reading Plato and then reading absoultely anything of note up from there.

    Not sure what I was trying to say there. Umm, I'm sure there's some sort of Cliff Notes on Nietzche, but I imagine you wouldn't really be able to jump into a serious Nietzche discussion after reading them.
    I guess the point I made was wrong. I recall INTXs being extremely helpful/enthusiastic in teaching what they know to people whom are interested. (INTPs more so than INTJs.)

    So I apologize and take back my comment.

    I feel I betrayed all my INTX friends, who are more inclined to enthusiastically teach what they know than any other type.

    Urghh!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    If you want to learn about Nietzsche, you can read 'Ecce homo', his autobiography, which is a review of Nietzsche (work and persona) by Nietzsche. It is rather short.
    I would rather hear summarized version of all major important theories so I could explore the once I find interesting.

    Summarize I believe people would be more inclined to do.

  5. #15
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Come on @Nicodemus, you don't want Riva to be learning Nietzche off the streets, do you? Imagine all that misinformation out there..

  6. #16
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riva View Post
    I would rather hear summarized version of all major important theories so I could explore the once I find interesting.

    Summarize I believe people would be more inclined to do.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedri...che#Philosophy

    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    Come on @Nicodemus, you don't want Riva to be learning Nietzche off the streets, do you? Imagine all that misinformation out there..
    One and not the smallest part of Nietzsche's appeal is his style. The way he presents his philosophy is itself part of the philosophy. That and the fact that any summary is already an interpretation prompt me to say that the best way to learn about Nietzsche (and all other philosophers who are also writers) is to read the original (or a translation of it).

  7. #17
    Sniffles
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    The entire breadth and depth of western philosophy kant really be expressed in anything less then at least entire essays dedicated to it's various schools of thought, if ones intention is to grasp western philosophy in it's whole (if one wants the white bread superficial version of it, then certain intro level texts usually suffice for such the task).
    Did you misspell "can't" on purpose?

    Anyways, as for a nice summary of Western philosophy, I think this suffices rather well:

    "The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato."
    - Alfred North Whitehead

  8. #18
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    3 minute philosophy:









    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Not many people know the famous quote from him shortly before his death "You know, I've been really wrong about all this and none of you had the balls to say so", that's my favourite Nietzsche quote.
    Frithjof Schuon's summary of Nietzsche is perhaps my favorite quote about him: "A volcanic genius if there ever was one...but in a manner that is both deviated and demented."

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Not many people know the famous quote from him shortly before his death "You know, I've been really wrong about all this and none of you had the balls to say so", that's my favourite Nietzsche quote.
    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Idealist View Post
    I'm sorry, where did Nietzsche say that?
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    In his bed, cared for by the sister he detested, at the end of a ten-year period of mental derangement, almost a year after he lost his ability to speak.
    Is this quote from 'My Sister and I'?

    Or is Lark now in the business of completely making stuff up to discredit ideas he does not appreciate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    Frithjof Schuon's summary of Nietzsche is perhaps my favorite quote about him: "A volcanic genius if there ever was one...but in a manner that is both deviated and demented."
    How surprising to hear such a sentiment from someone described like this:

    In his teachings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and mankind... The main subjects of his prose as well as his poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of man's life journey from his Creator back to Him.
    @Riva, Curzon, or whatever, trying to learn the whole of western philosophy in this way is an impossible task.

    There are tons of "History of Western Philosophy" books out there -- buy one, and read it.

    Then keep in mind that there are many others that will probably say something different.

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