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  1. #251
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    My pleasure! Good analysis!

  2. #252
    Senior Member redcheerio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    My pleasure! Good analysis!
    Thanks! I can't take credit, though. Marm brought it up, and gave credit where credit was due, which I later found here (assuming this is the same guy Marm was talking about):

    Quote Originally Posted by Arclight View Post
    ISFP. Someone said this and it makes the most sense.. He is stuck in an Fi Ni loop.

    Poor guy
    Although actually, looks like he also got it from someone before him....

  3. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by redcheerio View Post
    Thanks! I can't take credit, though. Marm brought it up, and gave credit where credit was due, which I later found here (assuming this is the same guy Marm was talking about):



    Although actually, looks like he also got it from someone before him....
    Simulated World loves Lenore Thomson and is no longer with us here at Type C, but his Jungian insight can still be found on PersN. He's the one who I first saw suggest the Fi/Ni loop for Vic, and I realize now that I grasp function theory better just how well ISFP fits than INFP for him.

    Sim also spotted JTG's Si/Fi loop FROM A DISTANCE, even while I from close up was like "why does he haz soooo much Fi? Evil ISFP? But no that's not right? BUT WHY SO MUCH FI???" (depressed ISTJ).

    SW also was very insistent that I had Fi/Te rather than Fe/Ti, and when I finally realized how unbelievably true that was after much harassment, I understood that function theory was worth learning.

  4. #254
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Just thinking about his post in that other thread from this morning.

    Since his mother withdraws her love and approval when he's not doing what she tells him to do, I wonder if there's a repetitive pattern where he has to act up harshly to regain her attention? Then she gives him hell but stops ignoring him when he's repentant.

  5. #255
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    Good job, Marm!

  6. #256
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by redcheerio View Post
    Thanks! I can't take credit, though. Marm brought it up, and gave credit where credit was due, which I later found here (assuming this is the same guy Marm was talking about):



    Although actually, looks like he also got it from someone before him....
    I believe the first person to coin that term was an old member named simulatedworld, and it was probably derived from Lenore Thomson's theory on Tertiary Temptation. It's bullshit that relying on the dominant and tertiary hampers your ability to change your attitude or learn new things. If our cognitive functions were the only forces that determine attitudes and cognition, then that would be true. But they are not.

  7. #257
    Senior Member redcheerio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    I believe the first person to coin that term was an old member named simulatedworld, and it was probably derived from Lenore Thomson's theory on Tertiary Temptation. It's bullshit that relying on the dominant and tertiary hampers your ability to change your attitude or learn new things. If our cognitive functions were the only forces that determine attitudes and cognition, then that would be true. But they are not.
    Of course there is still choice to change it. The theory merely explains the person's current thought process. It's more difficult for them to change if they don't recognize it themselves, though. Edit: Especially if they are particularly enamored with their new thought process.

  8. #258
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by redcheerio View Post
    Of course there is still choice to change it. The theory merely explains the person's current thought process. It's more difficult for them to change if they don't recognize it themselves, though.
    I agree that recognizing your attributes is a path to change. Yeah, you can change it, but then it's not the same theory.

    EDIT: In fact, sim had the gall to claim that "tert loops" explain away personality disorders and vice versa. What a terrible abuse. Sure, Jung made many statements about the negative aspects of functions and how they may manifest themselves in terrible ways when people aren't aware of their own "venoms", but just being aware doesn't mean that you choose to dig deep and find an alternative to your old habits. There are people out there who are knowingly dysfunctional, openly pathological, and either use it as an excuse to refuse changing for the better (a sort of outwardly directed denial), or choose to revel in their shadows.

    Plus, a preference in functions doesn't necessitate a personality disorder. Personalities are composed of more than just functions.
    Last edited by Ginkgo; 09-08-2011 at 05:21 PM. Reason: personality

  9. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by redcheerio View Post
    Of course there is still choice to change it. The theory merely explains the person's current thought process. It's more difficult for them to change if they don't recognize it themselves, though.

    Yeah you can get caught in it, and it's harder for some people than others to snap out of it, depending on life experiences and other conditions (depression, abuse, neuroses, personality disorders) BUT YOU CAN SNAP OUT OF IT.

    I've watched the ISTJ come back into his Te, so it's not like it TRAPS YOU FOR LIFE.

    The smartest thing to do is recognize it and work on it, but some people can't or won't.

  10. #260
    Senior Member redcheerio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    I agree that recognizing your attributes is a path to change. Yeah, you can change it, but then it's not the same theory.
    No, the theory remains the same. It's just a description of something some people get caught in sometimes. Doesn't mean they can't work their way out of it if they want to.

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