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  1. #11

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    I think onemoretime put it quite eloquently.

    Regarding my own situation.

    I am seeing doctors regarding my sleep problems, and there are some health issues that could definitely be the cause, but so far that has yet to be resolved. Till, it is resolved, it is a limitation that I need to account for.

    I aim to make my "dabbling" in fields a way to synthesize new breakthroughs. I am explicitly picking an interdisciplinary field that can use my prior skills...I will have a very unique perspective entering the field.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  2. #12

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    Yeah, going along with what @onemoretime said, I think saying "don't accept limitations!" is overly simplistic and really much too idealistic. I'm not trying to sound like a prick, but it seems like an attitude people who have never had true limitations take (and it's a great mentality to have), but you can't assume that it can be applicable to everyone.

    I can wile away at something I won't physically be able to do in the long run and just end up feeling defeated and unhappy and full of self-loathing OR I can accept that this is a limitation of mine and focus that energy on something I can do, try my best and perhaps excel at it (cue: feelings of great self-worth and happiness).

    Example: I used to run. A lot. For hours and miles and I used to LOVE it. But now I can't run, but I've taken up biking and love it even more. I've accepted my limitation and focused my energy on something else.

    It's liberating more than anything.

  3. #13
    Aquaria mrcockburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegorystory View Post
    Yeah, going along with what @onemoretime said, I think saying "don't accept limitations!" is overly simplistic and really much too idealistic. I'm not trying to sound like a prick, but it seems like an attitude people who have never had true limitations take (and it's a great mentality to have), but you can't assume that it can be applicable to everyone.

    I can wile away at something I won't physically be able to do in the long run and just end up feeling defeated and unhappy and full of self-loathing OR I can accept that this is a limitation of mine and focus that energy on something I can do, try my best and perhaps excel at it (cue: feelings of great self-worth and happiness).

    Example: I used to run. A lot. For hours and miles and I used to LOVE it. But now I can't run, but I've taken up biking and love it even more. I've accepted my limitation and focused my energy on something else.

    It's liberating more than anything.
    I think there actually are limitations, but most people overestimate them, I'd say. It's probably the human drive for efficiency: "why work at something you might not improve on when there's something else you already can do?"

    EDIT: I'm speaking mainly about mental/spiritual limitations. Physical limitations tend to be more quickly/concretely determined. For instance, someone with a certain bone structure will be immediately ill suited for certain athletics.

    I'm a 21-year-old, 5'11 giraffe with a really delicate bone structure, and absolutely no muscle tone. It's pretty obvious that a gymnastics medal isn't going to come my way during this lifetime.

    The way I see it, a body is like ice, the mind is like water, and wisdom is like steam. Bodily abilities cannot be expanded without breaking the ice (body). Mental abilities can easily expand, but eventually the water does smear out to dryness (though few people actually smear the water to that point. They're happy with the little puddle right in front of them). Wisdom and spiritual abilities (EQ, etc) can pretty much float off to any length - like a cloud. There is no limit to what one can achieve in the realm of wisdom - neither in direction nor in depth.

    Although, the presence of any of these variables could also be likened to the amount of "heat" (intent) required.

    Anyone can have and use their body. But the mind naturally requires more "heat" (water - melted ice) - there has to be a clear desire to develop mentally, as opposed to rotting on the sofa by default. And to develop wisdom requires even more heat (steam), especially since there's no immediate tangible benefit to doing so. It can be a challenge to stick with, even during the time of practice - as there is a challenge with an unclear foreseeable reward. If you've ever tried to meditate, you'll know what I mean.

    And yes, physical activity can be very mental. That's where I call it "slush". Partially broken body "ice"/partially meaningful, directed "heat".

    Ok, I think I sound too much like Victor, so I might delete this tomorrow. This all made so much more sense in my head.
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  4. #14
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    Limitations? They're called challenges. You thought life was going to be easy huh?

    I've thought about how every little decision you make, no matter how minuscule, affects what you will do in the future. I've even played with this bit of information and have had some crazy experiences because of it.

    Stuff like deciding to carry a lighter around when you don't have a use for it and being surprised at just how many uses you can find for it (socially, physically, emotionally, relationship wise) and then wondering if it was the lighter that was doing it, or if it was just you tricking yourself into doing stuff you want to do, albeit subconsciously...

    There is a whole body of philosophy on free will. It's pretty entertaining, imo

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcockburn View Post
    I think there actually are limitations, but most people overestimate them, I'd say. It's probably the human drive for efficiency: "why work at something you might not improve on when there's something else you already can do?"
    This. It's called opportunity cost. We have to choose how we spend out time wisely. The flip side of that is that we also need "balance" and cannot put all our eggs into one basket.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  6. #16
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcockburn View Post
    I think there actually are limitations, but most people overestimate them, I'd say. It's probably the human drive for efficiency: "why work at something you might not improve on when there's something else you already can do?"
    If the pleasure is in the challenge, then it is not refusing to accept limitations at all - it's being willing to push yourself to the limit, and accepting that you've given your best effort, regardless of the outcome.

    EDIT: I'm speaking mainly about mental/spiritual limitations. Physical limitations tend to be more quickly/concretely determined. For instance, someone with a certain bone structure will be immediately ill suited for certain athletics.

    I'm a 21-year-old, 5'11 giraffe with a really delicate bone structure, and absolutely no muscle tone. It's pretty obvious that a gymnastics medal isn't going to come my way during this lifetime.

    The way I see it, a body is like ice, the mind is like water, and wisdom is like steam. Bodily abilities cannot be expanded without breaking the ice (body). Mental abilities can easily expand, but eventually the water does smear out to dryness (though few people actually smear the water to that point. They're happy with the little puddle right in front of them). Wisdom and spiritual abilities (EQ, etc) can pretty much float off to any length - like a cloud. There is no limit to what one can achieve in the realm of wisdom - neither in direction nor in depth.
    Then again, the smeared water does not simply disappear, but instead turns to vapor. Just as a lifetime of acquiring knowledge takes a while to coalesce into wisdom.

    Although, the presence of any of these variables could also be likened to the amount of "heat" (intent) required.

    Anyone can have and use their body. But the mind naturally requires more "heat" (water - melted ice) - there has to be a clear desire to develop mentally, as opposed to rotting on the sofa by default. And to develop wisdom requires even more heat (steam), especially since there's no immediate tangible benefit to doing so. It can be a challenge to stick with, even during the time of practice - as there is a challenge with an unclear foreseeable reward. If you've ever tried to meditate, you'll know what I mean.
    I think what you're saying is that spiritual development (however you understand that concept) requires a fuller commitment of self than physical or intellectual development. I would agree.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc4HG...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOlTd...eature=related

    Did the above bloke accept his limitations .. Hell no, he's too busy enjoying life.

    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    I disagree.

    Accepting one's limitations doesn't mean limiting possibilities. It means understanding that some things aren't possibilities - they're simply not happening. It means being able to distinguish between what might be and what will never be.
    That's your prerogitive to which you are entitled to express
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
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  8. #18
    Self sustaining supernova Zoom's Avatar
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    The acceptance of my limitations mainly comes in regards to energy and how much of it I have - to devote to others, myself, and miscellaneous projects. I've had to realize that I can't just go non-stop for days on end with no alone time and little sleep... if I don't recharge regularly I burn out.

    Oh, and that it is possible to get friction burn from too much sex. That counts as recognizing a limitation, right?

  9. #19
    Aquaria mrcockburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    If the pleasure is in the challenge, then it is not refusing to accept limitations at all - it's being willing to push yourself to the limit, and accepting that you've given your best effort, regardless of the outcome.

    Then again, the smeared water does not simply disappear, but instead turns to vapor. Just as a lifetime of acquiring knowledge takes a while to coalesce into wisdom..

    I think what you're saying is that spiritual development (however you understand that concept) requires a fuller commitment of self than physical or intellectual development. I would agree.
    - agreed.

    - It only turns into vapor if you're aware of the lessons imparted by the experience of improving in a mental area. Otherwise, there are diminishing returns on the smear as the limit is approached - as you focus on stretching out one skill, you let other skills, other smears of water, dry up. It ends up as a net loss.

    - Yes. And not just that, but there is no tangible firewood the world provides to fuel your heat - and nothing for the heat itself to burn - no incentive. So you need a steady supply of internal willpower. So spirituality/wisdom is limitless, but sadly, there's no market for it.
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by saslou View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc4HG...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOlTd...eature=related

    Did the above bloke accept his limitations .. Hell no, he's too busy enjoying life.
    Are you kidding me? This guy optimizes accepting limitations and making the most of what you have. He even says, "At no point in my life did I say 'I wish I had hands and legs'". He accepted his condition and made the best of it.

    In fact, he'd probably be less successful if did have limbs...and you know there are very expensive prosthesis that he could have gone and tried to get, but he didn't. At this point, it would likely hinder his life's purpose to get artificial limbs.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

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