User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 51

  1. #31
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,529

    Flat

    When I discovered the universe is flat, I doubted the existence of God.

    But what does, the universe is flat, mean?

    It means the universe is not curved. And this means that the sum total of all the energy in the universe is zero.

    So when a theist tells me the universe couldn't have come from nothing, and so must have been created by God, I simply reply that the universe did come from nothing and so has no need of a God.

    But how do we know the universe is flat?

    We have measured the background radiation from the big bang so accurately we now know the universe is flat.

  2. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blankpages View Post
    I've pretty much made peace with it all now, but it for a while it was painful and difficult to accept. That's one of the reasons I normally stay away from these types of discussions: all the assumptions that atheists and skeptics are "closed-minded" and have never considered other points of view and just follow along with whatever science tells them piss me off. To an extent that sort of thing is quite natural when people encounter those who disagree with them, but it gets to me when it comes to this topic. This was somewhere my mind really didn't want to go at first, and I went there anyway. That is the opposite of closed-mindedness. Whatever anyone may think of my conclusions, I sure as hell didn't arrive here through closed-mindedness or refusing to question things.

    Well, that was quite the wall of text, wasn't it?. I think I'll just make short posts for a while.
    I resonated a lot with your whole journey, really. My mum has always been into all that new-age-y type stuff and she's always had a very complex, different set of views from anyone else in the world. I was an only child raised by just her and she, too, always spoke with such conviction and authority about her beliefs that I just stuck to everything she told me (later on, like you, I'd come to the conclusion that while she always taught me to question authority, question everything, she never included "question your beliefs, question your feelings" - perhaps the most crucial questioning of all). As I grew older I started to doubt a lot of what she believed in, but I played along, knowing that it would probably hurt her feelings if I just started tearing apart OUR beliefs. So I never really dissected those beliefs much. For her and for myself. I think part of me was afraid to because I knew what the answer would be if I did.

    When I was 19 I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (a chronic, disabling autoimmune disease). I spent a lot of time in bed before I could finally get treated because I couldn't walk or get around very well. It was a really, really difficult time in my life and I ended up falling into depression. So with all the time I spent alone in bed, depressed and disabled I just thought. A lot. About everything. And the more I thought the more I came into questions concerning death and life and existence. I thought about everything I'd believed and slowly but surely I chipped away at it, gradually coming closer to the conclusion that there probably isn't life after death. There probably isn't some great spirit responsible for the earth and all the life on it. I read more and more about science (I'd always loved science, but never to the extent that I do now) and the reality of things became more and more clear. I stopped thinking of "because I just know" as a valid argument in these matters.

    But I'd be lying if I said it wasn't a painful realisation. It was very painful. And it made my depression worse in my respects. I'd think "if this is the way my life is going to be (lying in bed, not being able to walk or dress myself) and there's nothing better when I die, then what the fuck is the point of all of this?"

    And gradually I got better and as I got better I pulled out of my depression. I got a mobility and a job and was able to pick up my life a bit, and I started to read more and more about science and arguments against the existence of life after death. It was really difficult to stomach at first. I had to reprogramme a lot of information that I'd previously accepted as the truth. I battled with fear and sadness at the thought of there being nothing more than this life, but as I became more accustomed to it and as the sound, rational arguments mounted up, I developed a much more open mind about everything.

    Now I'd say I'm an agnostic atheist because that's simply what makes the most sense. I don't know that what my mother believes in isn't true. It's unlikely, but I have no way of knowing. I'm more inclined to believe in science, but even then, I'm comfortable questioning that. And the truth of that nut is that science is also limited and, well, we just don't know.

    And I've also taken to not going down these existential/religious/what-do-I-believe-in roads anymore. I just try to focus on making what I have in this life the best and most fulfilling as possible and really, that's all I know I can do.

    Whew! A wall of text to match your wall of text. I feel like I had more to say, but this is just how it came out so I'm sticking to it.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Critical Hit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    338

    Default

    Miracles actually.

    The idea that God would go through the trouble of designing this complex and fine tuned physical world only to violate the laws ofthat world whenever he felt like it seemed silly. Especially when you consider how random and pointless they seem, this person gets cured of cancer, this person doesnt.

    Then it was the idea of free will vs. determinism. We apparently have the freedom to choose God or to go to Hell, but how can that be when all we are is the result of our past?
    +10% Crit Chance

  4. #34
    Senior Member Stigmata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    1,362

    Default

    I was always very skeptical, yet I never sought to subscribe to any sort of it title just out of fear of the societal implications for doing so. Even as a child I remember my attempts to have an adult provide some clarity on the matter were met with hostility and rejection, therefore I learned early on to contain these thoughts within myself, as opposed to airing them out to the masses in an attempt to question that which they established as facts. As I've gotten older I've come to reach an orientation on my own terms by both collecting bits and pieces of information various sources, as well as by dissecting the common theistic believes rationally overtime, yet even now while I don't deny that I'm not a theist, I generally seek to avoid the topic when presented with it.
    "I'm just here so I won't get fined."

  5. #35
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Even though my parents are christian. I can't remember a moment in my life I believed without question. The very notion has felt alien to me from a very young age.

    When I was 8 I asked my mother where the prophets of the bible got their stories from. And I wasn't satisfies with the answer I got. xD
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  6. #36
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,390

    Default

    What was the first thought that made you believe?

    What a silly question.

  7. #37
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InvisibleJim View Post
    What was the first thought that made you believe?

    What a silly question.
    Actually, if one assumes belief is generally a taught behaviour and not the result of hallucinative episodes, the question isn't silly the other way around, and pretty obvious that way around.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  8. #38
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,390

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Actually, if one assumes belief is generally a taught behaviour and not the result of hallucinative episodes, the question isn't silly the other way around, and pretty obvious that way around.
    If one assumes disbelief is generally a taught behaviour and not the result of making decisions based upon the evidence then I call shenanigans.

    Anyone who either really believes in god or who really disbelieves in existential deities is ignoring a lack of evidence in either direction. They need to fess up and say 'We don't really know'.

  9. #39
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InvisibleJim View Post
    If one assumes disbelief is generally a taught behaviour and not the result of making decisions based upon the evidence then I call shenanigans.

    Anyone who either really believes in god or who really disbelieves in existential deities is ignoring a lack of evidence in either direction. They need to fess up and say 'We don't really know'.
    I really don't know, but I don't care either way and that's a stance more easily adaptable through agnosticism or atheism. And doesn't go well with being a theist.

    See what I did there. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  10. #40
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,390

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I really don't know, but I don't care either way and that's a stance more easily adaptable through agnosticism or atheism. And doesn't go well with being a theist.

    See what I did there. :P
    *pats head*

    The point wasn't regarding your individual beliefs; however this kind of thinking is how we believed the sun revolved around the earth when we did not have the equipment and knowledge required to prove otherwise.

    Glad to hear it however fluffy.

Similar Threads

  1. What was the first movie you ever bought (VHS &/or DVD)?
    By PeaceBaby in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 10-05-2017, 11:05 PM
  2. What was the first video game you played and completed?
    By prplchknz in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 05-09-2015, 03:57 PM
  3. What is the first book that ever made you cry?
    By kyli_ryan in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 02-08-2014, 09:57 AM
  4. [NT] What's the first thing that pops in your mind?
    By guesswho in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 10-03-2010, 04:06 AM
  5. Replies: 57
    Last Post: 11-12-2009, 10:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO