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Thread: You're American

  1. #51
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    I'd rather have some culture in our country, even if that means several different ones who fight for recognition or superiority, than no culture at all. I'm not a fan of homogeny and staleness for various reasons.
    could I ask you to elaborate. I think I agree with you, but I'd need to know what you define as culture
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    Clarification: When I say first generation, I mean the first generation to be born in the U.S. (not the immigrants to the U.S.)



    Anyone else feel this way? Are there particular ways to quell this?
    You're not alone, my daughter's boyfriend is experiencing a similar problem. His parents berate him for his "Americanization" (he's Vietnamese). Of course this makes him angry and, at 15, pushes him to rebel even more.
    It must be a tough position to be in, good luck.

  3. #53
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    could I ask you to elaborate. I think I agree with you, but I'd need to know what you define as culture
    Culture -The set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.

    That is how I think of it.
    I prefer it when there are several cultures within one country.
    It keeps us sharp.

  4. #54
    Intergalactic Badass mujigay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    Culture -The set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.

    That is how I think of it.
    I prefer it when there are several cultures within one country.
    It keeps us sharp.
    I love having several cultures as well, but Jesus Christ, it gets grating when people think that they can tell one another where they belong.

    example: "You're not American, you're from Pakistan. Get out of America, Paki."

    example 2: "You might look Asian, but on the inside, you're all American. Get out of Asia, twinkie."

    And so on and so forth. Of course, the examples might be a little exaggerated, but that's the gist of it.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlippoth View Post
    The whole monolithic white America vs those with a tan thing is kind of ridiculous, and recent as well. Driving around small towns in my state, you can see signs of the cultural identities past. There are towns with old signs still in German, Swedish, Czech, and you know, English. And listening to the stories around here, they all had their little clashes. Anyone claiming to school you on what America is probably hasn't ever seen anything much outside of what is spoon fed to them by society.
    The only part of America that I truly know is the area in which I live in. Where 1 in 10 families have a mixed heritage. Where I can live right next to (as in literally being neighbors,)in this suburb, Mexican-Americans, African-Americans/Blacks, Vietnamese-Americans, Indian-Americans, Chinese-Americans, Whites, mixed, you name it...., and there wouldn't really be a problem with it. That is what defines my part of "America." Where there are immigrants that do come here legally. Which can be very different from someone living somewhere else.

    Probably the biggest problem when it comes to this city is that people get these attitudes of each other from the rest of society just like you said.

  6. #56
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mujigay View Post
    I love having several cultures as well, but Jesus Christ, it gets grating when people think that they can tell one another where they belong.

    example: "You're not American, you're from Pakistan. Get out of America, Paki."

    example 2: "You might look Asian, but on the inside, you're all American. Get out of Asia, twinkie."

    And so on and so forth. Of course, the examples might be a little exaggerated, but that's the gist of it.
    They be jelly.

  7. #57
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    I liken myself more to a lone lion fighting off a heard of elephants, but perhaps I'm just being self glorifying
    More like a death-wish

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    Yes, I still take part in some culture and traditions that come from being Asian. In fact, I am (or was) the one who burns incense for my ancestors on a daily basis as it was almost like my sole responsibility to do so. Of all else, I am like the gatekeeper of my family.



    Yeah, that is how I feel like, an outsider.

    It is hard having to hear that I am not American for still practicing the cultures that my parents brought here. Sometimes I hear something along the lines of "This is America, stop practicing those stuff here." or "You eat those type of food? Ewwwwwww."

    It is just as hard having to hear that I am not "Asian" enough because I don't speak my parent's language fluently nor eat everything that they eat. It sometimes become "Ohhhh, so now you want to be one of those Americanized people that can't handle these type of food?"

    At the end of both scenarios, I ask myself, why can't I be both without being shoved by both sides?
    yeah. i totally understand you. i get comments on my speech patterns from people where i live and people in my family. my accent is too heavy for the family and not heavy enough for the neighbors.

    i wonder why people feel like you have to fit in so perfectly. what's the problem with being different? i really don't understand. why do they care how we talk, or what we eat, or our religious practices or how we dress or anything else? a long time ago i suppose it was threatening, but we moved past that like 1,000 years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by mmhmm View Post
    i don't identify with one culture at all.
    and have always considered myself a
    third-culture kid.



    face-value wise i'd have more in common with an
    american that lived in brazil for 6 years better than
    an american born asian who can't speak anything
    else but english and only left the country once to
    go to their great-grandmother's 100th birthday in
    the motherland.

    for me, it has to do more with outlook and exposure
    to the world and openess.
    mmhmm that's so cool!!!
    that's totally me, too... even though i have mostly only lived in one country. but the cultural divide is enough so that i feel everything they are talking about in there.

    Characteristics

    There are different characteristics that impact the typical American third culture kid:
    Sociopsychology
    90% feel "out of sync" with their peers.
    90% report feeling as if they understand other people and cultural groups better than the average American.
    80% believe they can get along with anybody, and they often do, due to their sociocultural adaptability.
    Divorce rates among TCKs are lower than the general population, but TCKs marry at an older age (25+).
    More welcoming of others into their community.
    Lack a sense of "where home is", but are often nationalistic.
    Cognitive and emotional development
    Teenage TCKs are more mature than non-TCKs, but in their twenties take longer than their peers to focus their aims.
    Depression is comparatively prevalent among TCKs.
    Sense of identity and well-being directly and negatively by repatriation.
    Linguistically adept (not as true for military TCKs).
    A study whose subjects were all "career military brats"—those who had a parent in the military from birth through high school—shows that brats are linguistically adept.
    Like all children, TCKs may experience stress and even grief from the relocation experience.
    Education and career
    TCKs are 4 times as likely as non-TCKs to earn a bachelor's degree (81% vs 21%)
    40% earn an advanced degree (as compared to 5% of the non-TCK population.)
    45% of TCKs attended three universities before attaining a degree. (i have attended 3 c: )
    44% earned undergraduate degree after the age of 22.
    Education, medicine, business management, self-employment, and highly-skilled positions are the most common professions for TCKs.
    TCKs are unlikely to work for big business, government, or follow their parents' career choices. "One won't find many TCKs in large corporations. Nor are there many in government ... they have not followed in parental footsteps".
    Quote Originally Posted by Qlippoth View Post
    It's a 'person not born as your standard white guy and located in an area filled with people who like to comment on it' thing.
    yeah exactly. or fuck, it can be your standard white guy (or chick, in my case), just living in any situation where your parents' culture is significantly different enough from the culture that you are born into that a substantial divide is created within your social identity. it's like there are two pieces of you... one of your "native" culture, and one of your "family" culture... and they are both and neither yours...

  9. #59
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    All the pride of an obedient child

    I'm not American but at the same time it is important for me to understand America because we have three treaties with America - a military treaty, an economic treaty and a land treaty.

    I also recognise it is not as important for America to understand Oz as America is the largest economy in the world and we are only the sixth.

    But not only in Oz but throughout the world America is recognised as parochial. America is parochial in part because of geography and in part because of protestantism. And what is important to recognise is that Americans are proud of being parochial because when they are parochial, they are carrying out a national imperative. So Americans are parochial with all the pride of an obedient child.

    So we get a double message from Americans. First we are told we are all free and equal but Americans are freer and more equal than others.

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