User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 41

  1. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    You may feel no different but I'd hope and suspect that there is a great deal of difference, cognitive processes, experience contingent insight formation and reflection or consequential thinking I'd wager should be streets ahead of were they were and, while its a pretty individual thing how it develops and what it keeps apace with I'd hope that reason would be trumphing affect more often in their decision making.

    Its not tradition, tradition is just the vehicle by which one generation tries to communicate its learning to another Jr. generation, although it appears to be badly in need of repair that's a different issue, there's a lot of factors militating against individual psychological maturation.
    Well of course I have matured emotionally, mentally and responsibility wise.
    It's not the same thing.

    Traditions have changed. People stay the same.

    Why would my preferences change just because I am older??

  2. #12
    violaine
    Guest

    Default

    Agree with the posters who have already mentioned it's about having more options in life. Less societal pressure to adhere to prescribed roles too.

  3. #13
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,489

    Default

    I think a big factor if not the biggest factor is extended education compared to previous generations. Where our parents went to high school, and maybe college for some, for us several years of college is absolutely expected/required and some even go on to grad school which can sometimes mean being in school until ~age 30!

    School's just not an environment conducive to being "mature", really.

    Not sure about the ones who drop out of school. I don't know any of them personally.
    -end of thread-

  4. #14
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sx/sp
    Socionics
    SEI
    Posts
    2,399
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  5. #15
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I have been fortunate, lived in relative wealth and freedom for my entire life. I could do almost anything I want, become a doctor, lawyer, scientist, politician, farmer, business owner -- you name it. So what should I do? "Anything you want."

    Another issue is how to define "settling down." I have chosen a career path, I am married, have a house, and a relatively stable life, so am I settled down? I don't feel like it, and don't know that I ever will.

  6. #16
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    My parents did nothing/aren't particularly screwed up. I just think being "adult" is boring. I can't see what the big deal is. And I don't mean literal old people. Some of the most whimsical/childlike I've met were elderly. When I think of adult, I think dull.. and anyone who takes themselves too seriously. It could be a 20 something hung up on his sense of manhood. Or the overly career driven woman who's too uptight or image oriented. Or people who have kids, but don't take advantage of that blessing and try to see the world through their child's eyes.. but instead, just act like grumpy blue collar rednecks who's only form of entertainment in life is football, chores, hotdogs, and beer.. and they don't even play with their kids. Or forgot how to laugh at a Disney movie. I can't even suffer a conversation with any of these people. Why would I want to be one?

  7. #17
    I drink your milkshake. Thessaly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xNFP
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    I can't think of any big introduction but I feel like a lot of people in my generation (late 20s, early 30s) are still big kids, they don't want to grow up. What is it about us as a generation and the time we life in that we find it so hard to commit, to settle down etc? And is that necessarily a bad thing?
    This:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/ma...od-t.html?_r=2
    With dreamers, pure and simple, the imagination remains a vaguely sketched inner affair. It is not embodied in any aesthetic or practical invention. Reverie is the equivalent of weak desires. Dreamers are the aboulics of the creative imagination.

  8. #18
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Also, ditto to what Kdude said.

    And that NY Times article was pretty good.

  9. #19
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arclight View Post
    Is tradition being confused with maturity here?
    Yes.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  10. #20
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    Aeon
    Enneagram
    10w so
    Socionics
    LOL
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    I can't think of any big introduction but I feel like a lot of people in my generation (late 20s, early 30s) are still big kids, they don't want to grow up. What is it about us as a generation and the time we life in that we find it so hard to commit, to settle down etc? And is that necessarily a bad thing?
    Because there is no economic need like there was in previous generations. But maturity is not just about getting married and a mortgage.

    But does anyone think that prior generations did not say the same things about their children? The baby boomers themselves were accused of not growing up.

    Is ageism any more acceptable than racism or sexual discrimination?

Similar Threads

  1. Losing weight why is it so hard for so many people?
    By jixmixfix in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 131
    Last Post: 04-01-2013, 11:59 AM
  2. [NT] Why is it so hard for Me to stop focusing on Myself?
    By The Ü™ in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 06:06 AM
  3. Why is it so hard to not feed the trolls?
    By Zergling in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-15-2007, 05:23 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO