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  1. #61
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Whether we like it or not, each and every one of us will face it in some point of our lives.

    Why fear it when we don't know when our deaths are going to come? Make something of it before that time comes, that way, death is a transition.

  2. #62
    Senior Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuchIrony View Post
    Public speaking and spiders rank much higher on the list of most common fears.

    Whenever there's a thread posted about death, I'm always surprised by the number of people claiming not to fear death at all. I sometimes wondering if they are seriously depressed or just in denial. Not too many people seem to be openly willing to admit that they fear it and that they are deeply unsettled by the thought.

    I fear death more than just about anything. The only thing I think I fear more than death is living on unfullfilling and meaningless life or not making any valuable contribution to society.

    When you die, you lose *everything* you've come to love and appreciate. You have no more contact with your loved ones or friends. You can't eat any more tasty food, listen to any more music, or see any more beautiful art. You can no longer do the things you love. You can no longer contribute to the betterment of society. You can no longer gain knowledge or insights on things. Death is far worse than major losses in life. If you lose a loved one, at least hopefully you have other relationships you can depend on. If you lose your hearing and can no longer listen to music, you still have your vision and can appreciate a sunset or beautiful art. But when you die, that's it. It's *all* gone.

    Maybe I take this viewpoint precisely because I don't believe in any sort of afterlife. However, I've heard several atheists also say they don't fear death either. The people who claim to not fear death are not necessarily depressed or nihilistic either. Some are very well adjusted people who currently enjoy life. And I'm not sure age has much to do with it either. It's not just old people who are saying that. I've heard that from 18 year olds as well.

    So are there others who share my attitude? I don't think I'm the only one. Or am I really on a different wavelength from others?
    I'm afraid of death.

    Sunshine: I'm afraid of dying.
    INFJ family member: That's because you're not really living.
    "To find beauty in loss, hope in darkness."

  3. #63
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunshine View Post
    I'm afraid of death.

    Sunshine: I'm afraid of dying.
    INFJ family member: That's because you're not really living.

  4. #64
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    i'm not afraid of death..not really and not for me. i believe the bit that's you still exists after and if i'm wrong..i won't know anyway...but...it kills me to think of causing hurt to those that love me so that...that i'll fiercely protect for as long as i can...plus there's lots of fun things to do and awesome interesting people to do them with so i'm hoping...for me...that it's really far off.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  5. #65
    Senior Member Blown Ghost's Avatar
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    there's no perceived benefit to admitting a fear one doesn't know how to overcome

  6. #66
    Member IntrovertedThinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuchIrony View Post
    Public speaking and spiders rank much higher on the list of most common fears.

    Whenever there's a thread posted about death, I'm always surprised by the number of people claiming not to fear death at all. I sometimes wondering if they are seriously depressed or just in denial. Not too many people seem to be openly willing to admit that they fear it and that they are deeply unsettled by the thought.
    Yeah, I don't really understand it when people say that they don't fear death.
    Although, some people have reasoned away any fear they would otherwise experience.
    I personally can reach a point where I realize that there is no logical point to fear death, yet I can't help but desire to avoid the fact that one day I will cease to be conscious and will no longer be.

    I fear death more than just about anything. The only thing I think I fear more than death is living on unfullfilling and meaningless life or not making any valuable contribution to society.
    Yeah, I had a pretty deep problem with the fear of death a few years ago. Went into an existential crisis.
    And yes, I do also fear a meaningless and forgettable life where I can't look back and say, "I actually did something worthwhile of which I'm proud."

    When you die, you lose *everything* you've come to love and appreciate. You have no more contact with your loved ones or friends. You can't eat any more tasty food, listen to any more music, or see any more beautiful art. You can no longer do the things you love. You can no longer contribute to the betterment of society. You can no longer gain knowledge or insights on things. Death is far worse than major losses in life. If you lose a loved one, at least hopefully you have other relationships you can depend on. If you lose your hearing and can no longer listen to music, you still have your vision and can appreciate a sunset or beautiful art. But when you die, that's it. It's *all* gone.
    Yes... this is the most depressing aspect of the anticipation of death: the lack of experience. While we are alive, these many pleasant experiences seem so wonderful.
    Discussing ideas with others; having social meetings and having fun. Spending quality time with your family. Eating interesting food every day. Experiencing many worlds of human creativity that truly please your senses, while sometimes sending you into other worlds entirely. Death is also a complete deletion of everything you've gained in life, rendering it all utterly wasted.

    By the way, are you an Absurdist?

    Maybe I take this viewpoint precisely because I don't believe in any sort of afterlife. However, I've heard several atheists also say they don't fear death either. The people who claim to not fear death are not necessarily depressed or nihilistic either. Some are very well adjusted people who currently enjoy life. And I'm not sure age has much to do with it either. It's not just old people who are saying that. I've heard that from 18 year olds as well.
    I'm an Absurdist, I'm an atheist, and I do fear death (although I constantly attempt to avoid thinking about that prospect now just to remain sane).

    So are there others who share my attitude? I don't think I'm the only one. Or am I really on a different wavelength from others?
    I relate entirely. And you're the only person I've ever known (til now) who has also felt this way about death.
    I'M NOT ALONE!!!!!

    Also, people with higher intelligence (supposedly) seem to ponder about death more often than less intelligent people (making us more likely to actually develop these fears with such potency and depth).

  7. #67
    Member IntrovertedThinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    Death is inevitable. Why fear this? When dead, you're not going to care about anything. You're gone.[/atheist position]
    The fear isn't exactly rational or logical.
    It's merely the result of irrationally loving life and not wanting it to end.

  8. #68
    Member IntrovertedThinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snuggletron View Post
    Have you ever suddenly lost consciousness? If you have, you'll know that in that period of being unconscious, you lose 'you'. There is no 'you' so there is no fear. Everything 'you' goes away. When you wake, you have no memory or conception of what happened in the period of time. This is very likely what death is, except death being permanent. You cannot have consciousness without working matter to support it (i.e.: a living normal-functioning brain). This is why death is nothing to be afraid of. Remember how things were before you were conceived in the womb? No. And that's a point worth mentioning.
    This is why I dislike sleeping.
    I enjoy being awake, experiencing the world.
    Sleep is so boring.

  9. #69
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IntrovertedThinker View Post
    I personally can reach a point where I realize that there is no logical point to fear death, yet I can't help but desire to avoid the fact that one day I will cease to be conscious and will no longer be.
    Yep, I relate. No human is entirely logical and rational, no matter how high your T score on the MBTI is. We are emotional and passionate beings.


    Quote Originally Posted by IntrovertedThinker View Post
    Yeah, I had a pretty deep problem with the fear of death a few years ago. Went into an existential crisis.
    And yes, I do also fear a meaningless and forgettable life where I can't look back and say, "I actually did something worthwhile of which I'm proud."
    What was the existential crisis like for you?




    Quote Originally Posted by IntrovertedThinker View Post
    Yes... this is the most depressing aspect of the anticipation of death: the lack of experience. While we are alive, these many pleasant experiences seem so wonderful.
    Discussing ideas with others; having social meetings and having fun. Spending quality time with your family. Eating interesting food every day. Experiencing many worlds of human creativity that truly please your senses, while sometimes sending you into other worlds entirely. Death is also a complete deletion of everything you've gained in life, rendering it all utterly wasted.
    This is very well stated. The last sentence is precisely why I feel the strong need to know that I've done something meaningful. Even though I'll no longer be consciously aware of my own experience, I hope to have a legacy that lives on after I'm dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by IntrovertedThinker View Post
    By the way, are you an Absurdist?
    Quoting Wikipedia:

    In philosophy, "The Absurd" refers to the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent meaning in life and the human inability to find any. In this context absurd does not mean "logically impossible," but rather "humanly impossible."[1] The universe and the human mind do not each separately cause the Absurd, but rather, the Absurd arises by the contradictory nature of the two existing simultaneously.
    Absurdism, therefore, is a philosophical school of thought stating that the efforts of humanity to find inherent meaning will ultimately fail (and hence are absurd), because no such meaning exists, at least in relation to the individual. As a philosophy, absurdism also explores the fundamental nature of the Absurd and how individuals, once becoming conscious of the Absurd, should react to it.
    Absurdism is very closely related to existentialism and nihilism and has its origins in the 19th century Danish philosopher, Søren Kierkegaard, who chose to confront the crisis humans faced with the Absurd by developing existential philosophy. Absurdism as a belief system was born of the European existentialist movement that ensued, specifically when the French Algerian philosopher and writer Albert Camus rejected certain aspects from that philosophical line of thought[2] and published his manuscript The Myth of Sisyphus. The aftermath of World War II provided the social environment that stimulated absurdist views and allowed for their popular development, especially in the devastated country of France.


    Yeah, I think I'm an absurdist.




    Quote Originally Posted by IntrovertedThinker View Post
    I relate entirely. And you're the only person I've ever known (til now) who has also felt this way about death.
    I'M NOT ALONE!!!!!

    Also, people with higher intelligence (supposedly) seem to ponder about death more often than less intelligent people (making us more likely to actually develop these fears with such potency and depth).
    Well I think there's more than just the two of us. But its good to know that I'm not alone in thinking this way.

    Here's the weird thing. I sometimes feel selfish for having these thoughts. Like I don't want to leave life to make room for someone else on this planet.

    You are right in that I'm sure intelligent people will ponder death far more and with greater intensity than less intelligent people.
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  10. #70
    Member IntrovertedThinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuchIrony View Post
    What was the existential crisis like for you?
    Horrible. I started suffering from anxiety at night and become completely obsessed with the fear of death so much so that I couldn't really enjoy even the most basic experiences. This also happened when I was depressed at one point. Food had no taste and I lost enjoyment of everything. Each day was one of suffering -- tormented by the anticipation of death, constantly thinking about that which I do not wish to accept, but which I logically know must be and won't really matter. I wish I could explain it more thoroughly, but I've not been in that condition for many months, so it's a bit foreign to me at this point. I just remember it being absolute mental agony.

    Here's the weird thing. I sometimes feel selfish for having these thoughts. Like I don't want to leave life to make room for someone else on this planet.
    Indeed. It's my great love of self that makes death so unbearable even as a thought... as something anticipated. Many people may find that self-absorbed and somewhat too self-loving, but I don't let that bother me. I don't think there's anything wrong with truly enjoying who you are and honestly admitting that you think you really enjoy being you every day when you wake up.

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