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  1. #11
    Senior Member Trentham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    it's very common for people in the workplace to talk about the Christian God as much as they talk about anything else in life, as a given.
    Right. The assumption is that everyone around them believes the same way. Around here it's taken to an even more granular level because the area is so predominantly Protestant. In a small town where 80% of the population is Baptist or Methodist, even Catholics and Jews can make folks uncomfortable merely by differing from the assumed norm.

    And a lot of people attend church on Sundays AND on Wednesday, along with various retreats, services, seminars, etc. When I was in elementary and middle school, I was allowed to sign a release to leave school grounds to study the Bible once a week; and we had a huge church camp in our area where I was a counselor through high school. During summers, I'd attend a few Vacation Bible Schools at churches near my home. Church is a big, serious business around here.
    Oh yeah - it's a social center more than anything. Gives folks something to do, especially in a small town where entertainment options may be limited. Although my parents aren't especially religious, (ESFJ) mom insisted on sending me to church, VBS and all that when I was growing up. I've talked to my dad about it and he insists she did it mostly to keep from looking like a bad parent. I would chalk it up as a mostly neutral experience - it neither helped nor hurt, but obviously wasn't an activity I felt worth continuing once I got out on my own.

    The "Pennsyltucky" jokes hold strong to any terrain between Philly and Pittsburgh.
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  2. #12
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    Four out of Five Americans Know Earth Revolves Around Sun
    Probing a more universal measure of knowledge, Gallup also asked the following basic science question, which has been used to indicate the level of public knowledge in two European countries in recent years: "As far as you know, does the earth revolve around the sun or does the sun revolve around the earth?" In the new poll, about four out of five Americans (79%) correctly respond that the earth revolves around the sun, while 18% say it is the other way around. These results are comparable to those found in Germany when a similar question was asked there in 1996; in response to that poll, 74% of Germans gave the correct answer, while 16% thought the sun revolved around the earth, and 10% said they didn't know. When the question was asked in Great Britain that same year, 67% answered correctly, 19% answered incorrectly, and 14% didn't know.

    The results below are based on telephone interviews with a randomly selected national sample of 1,016 adults, 18 years and older, conducted June 25-27, 1999. For results based on this sample, one can say with 95 percent confidence that the maximum error attributable to sampling and other random effects is plus or minus 3 percentage points. In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of public opinion polls.


    New Poll Gauges Americans' General Knowledge Levels

  3. #13
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trentham View Post
    Right. The assumption is that everyone around them believes the same way. Around here it's taken to an even more granular level because the area is so predominantly Protestant. In a small town where 80% of the population is Baptist or Methodist, even Catholics and Jews can make folks uncomfortable merely by differing from the assumed norm.
    In this area, there is still a rift beween Catholic and Protestant and even a tone with the Protestants that the Catholics "aren't really Christian" theologically ... or aren't really as serious about their faith as the new forms of Protestants are.

    (I'm not even sure I can use the word "Protestant" except to mean non-Catholic, because a lot of our mainstream "protestant" denoms are shrinking, being replaced by non-denoms, evangelicals, living-spirit pentecostal blends/etc.)

    Oh yeah - it's a social center more than anything. Gives folks something to do, especially in a small town where entertainment options may be limited. Although my parents aren't especially religious, (ESFJ) mom insisted on sending me to church, VBS and all that when I was growing up. I've talked to my dad about it and he insists she did it mostly to keep from looking like a bad parent. I would chalk it up as a mostly neutral experience - it neither helped nor hurt, but obviously wasn't an activity I felt worth continuing once I got out on my own.
    Well, I wouldn't chalk it up as purely social center here, since it still revolves around religion, but what it seems to serve as is a "safe microcosm" -- a place where people can approach modernity in an environment they believe is far more safe from corruption than if they would enter secular society. Everything is screened, everyone shares beliefs, it's like a special section of beach for everyone to hang out at where sandbars have been built (and netting put up) to keep out more chaotic/worldly forces. IOW, it's still centered around religion rather than socialness.

    If that is what you meant by social center, then yes.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #14
    Senior Member Trentham's Avatar
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    (I'm not even sure I can use the word "Protestant" except to mean non-Catholic, because a lot of our mainstream "protestant" denoms are shrinking, being replaced by non-denoms, evangelicals, living-spirit pentecostal blends/etc.)
    Those are growing here too, especially among the younger set who believe in Christian fundamentals and want to practice, but don't want to be led around by the nose and told what to think, as is all too often the case in Southern Baptist congregations.

    Well, I wouldn't chalk it up as purely social center here, since it still revolves around religion, but what it seems to serve as is a "safe microcosm" -- a place where people can approach modernity in an environment they believe is far more safe from corruption than if they would enter secular society. Everything is screened, everyone shares beliefs, it's like a special section of beach for everyone to hang out at where sandbars have been built (and netting put up) to keep out more chaotic/worldly forces. IOW, it's still centered around religion rather than socialness.

    If that is what you meant by social center, then yes.
    Yeah, that's very well-put.
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  5. #15
    ¡MI TORTA! Amethyst's Avatar
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    For whatever reason, the most prominent religion is Christianity here, but the most prominent denomination is Roman Catholicism, mostly because this town is full of Irish, Polish, and Italian immigrants. It doesn't really bother me, although I claim to not be a part of it because it's just not for me...the only thing that bothers me is the numerous amounts of people who are nutjobs about it, but that's everywhere I guess.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Trentham's Avatar
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    I searched for this link yesterday and couldn't find it - it's US only, but it will give a good indication of the geographical disparity amongst the different religious affiliations here. Click on "Baptist" for a nice scary dose of my reality...

    Religious adherents in the US
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  7. #17
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trentham View Post
    I searched for this link yesterday and couldn't find it - it's US only, but it will give a good indication of the geographical disparity amongst the different religious affiliations here. Click on "Baptist" for a nice scary dose of my reality...

    Religious adherents in the US
    Wow. Looks like, with the Baptists, uh, you got them ... all.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #18
    ¡MI TORTA! Amethyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trentham View Post
    I searched for this link yesterday and couldn't find it - it's US only, but it will give a good indication of the geographical disparity amongst the different religious affiliations here. Click on "Baptist" for a nice scary dose of my reality...

    Religious adherents in the US
    YIKES! :horor:

    I'm avoiding the south...and Utah.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Trentham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Wow. Looks like, with the Baptists, uh, you got them ... all.
    Yeah, that map speaks for itself.
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  10. #20
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    Four out of Five Americans Know Earth Revolves Around Sun
    Probing a more universal measure of knowledge, Gallup also asked the following basic science question, which has been used to indicate the level of public knowledge in two European countries in recent years: "As far as you know, does the earth revolve around the sun or does the sun revolve around the earth?" In the new poll, about four out of five Americans (79%) correctly respond that the earth revolves around the sun, while 18% say it is the other way around. These results are comparable to those found in Germany when a similar question was asked there in 1996; in response to that poll, 74% of Germans gave the correct answer, while 16% thought the sun revolved around the earth, and 10% said they didn't know. When the question was asked in Great Britain that same year, 67% answered correctly, 19% answered incorrectly, and 14% didn't know.

    The results below are based on telephone interviews with a randomly selected national sample of 1,016 adults, 18 years and older, conducted June 25-27, 1999. For results based on this sample, one can say with 95 percent confidence that the maximum error attributable to sampling and other random effects is plus or minus 3 percentage points. In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of public opinion polls.


    New Poll Gauges Americans' General Knowledge Levels
    So in Britian, 33% of people take the piss when asked stupid questions? That sounds about right.
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

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