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  1. #11
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    "Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking." -AE

    Might want to take that one to heart, Lark.
    Who is AE and what is meant by lazy habit of thinking?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Albert Einstein.

  3. #13
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
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    Whoever this AE is, he's partially right.
    Information is not knowledge, it must be mentally digested and often practiced or used for it to become that.
    Those who read too much lofty theory are often out of touch with reality, as a result of reading too much and thinking too little.

    However, this has nothing to do with age, in my opinion.
    Theory and practice are inseparable parts of a whole, working system.
    The separation itself is an odd thing, indeed.
    Which sort of is akin to the separation of opinon/belief and action.


    Yes, the foundation of knowledge at an early age usually starts out with books, quite generally.
    Stories, songs and today television are also sources of inspiration.
    To further drive home the point of theory and practice, though...
    Does not kids often go out and reenact the very things they have read about, or derivatives of what they have been told through books?
    Whether it is cowboys and indians, knights and monsters, soldier versus soldier, spies, kids playing doctor...
    Through this "practice" the children gain a deeper understanding of what these things feel like.
    Through their imaginations they can bridge the gap of being shot with a peashooter while the adrenaline is pumping to what it feels like to be in an actual battle.
    Without this, the little stories about soldiers fighting or doctors saving lives would probably mean very little.

    Books, though, seem to create individuals with a more in-depth understanding of things, though, compared to the kids who are brought up only with television.
    Those kids often seem to turn out less imaginative and knowledgeable, somehow.

    My conclusion based on my own observations is that your assumption is correct.
    In my world-view literature is the foundation of knowledge.

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    But I don't like the telephone.
    Do you mean I will never hear your delightful German accent?

  5. #15
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    No, this I did not mean.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    To read is the foundation of all knowledge - Knight Templar

    Do you agree with this statement? I just saw it in a DVD I got today and thought it could be an interesting talking point.
    The capacity to learn comes first.
    "One tequila, two tequila, three tequila, floor." - George Carlin

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    Senior Member LunarMoon's Avatar
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    No, the ability to communicate and pass on information from generation to generation is the foundation of all knowledge. It is also the most important and distinguishable trait of our species. Knowledge existed far before the written word and it also existed for centuries within several Native American cultures that had no written language. It is also worth remembering that before the 20th century, literacy was not always as common as it is today, yet several illiterate people carried a vast amount of survival knowledge that is arguably more valuable than that of which many 21st century individuals possess.
    Surgeons replace one of your neurons with a microchip that duplicates its input-output functions. You feel and behave exactly as before. Then they replace a second one, and a third one, and so on, until more and more of your brain becomes silicon. Since each microchip does exactly what the neuron did, your behavior and memory never change. Do you even notice the difference? Does it feel like dying? Is some other conscious entity moving in with you?
    -Steven Pinker on the Ship of Theseus Paradox

  8. #18
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    "Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking." -AE

    Might want to take that one to heart, Lark.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Who is AE and what is meant by lazy habit of thinking?
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Albert Einstein.
    Ow, my sides are hurting. This couldn't have been better if it was scripted.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    To read is the foundation of all knowledge - Knight Tenplar
    Templar*.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    Templar*.
    I was waiting to see if anyone read and corrected that you know.

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