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  1. #51
    Sniffles
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    Aquinas was heavily influenced by Aristotle.

  2. #52
    Starcrossed Seafarer Aquarelle's Avatar
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    That makes sense. I've never been a big philosophy fan, so I'm not intimately familiar with most of these philosophies. But those two, from the descriptions, sound most like me.
    Masquerading as a normal person day after day is exhausting.

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  3. #53
    Sniffles
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    GK Chesterton wrote one of the better introductions to Aquinas; which is summarised here:
    Lecture 67: St. Thomas Aquinas

  4. #54
    Ginkgo
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    I was reading the results and it seemed like Aquinas was a consistently agreed with philosopher. Then I read your article-

    But the point is, none of the modern philosophies make any sense to the man on the street. Surprisingly, the philosophy that is closest to the mind of the man on the street is the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Firmly rooted in reality, fully respectful of human dignity, and, in every sense of the word, reasonable.
    I must agree.

  5. #55
    Senior Member lucibelle's Avatar
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    Ethics is the area of philosophy that I really don't give a damn about
    Decided to do this anyway.

    Email Your Results (See link below this list)
    1. Nietzsche (100%)
    2. Thomas Hobbes (98%)
    3. Cynics (97%)
    4. David Hume (95%)
    5. Stoics (83%)
    6. Jean-Paul Sartre (81%)
    7. Ayn Rand (78%)
    8. Epicureans (56%)
    9. Kant (52%)
    10. Nel Noddings (48%)
    11. Spinoza (42%)
    12. John Stuart Mill (39%)
    13. Jeremy Bentham (36%)
    14. Aristotle (35%)
    15. Aquinas (30%)
    16. Plato (29%)
    17. Ockham (26%)
    18. St. Augustine (25%)
    19. Prescriptivism (24%)
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Teh annoying/boring.

  6. #56
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucibelle View Post
    Ethics is the area of philosophy that I really don't give a damn about
    I see this by your results!
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  7. #57
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    Default I WIN

    1. St. Augustine (100%)
    2. Spinoza (96%)
    3. Stoics (89%)
    4. Aquinas (89%)
    5. Jean-Paul Sartre (79%)
    6. Nietzsche (75%)
    7. David Hume (68%)
    8. Cynics (62%)
    9. Ayn Rand (60%)
    10. Kant (58%)
    11. Aristotle (53%)
    12. Ockham (49%)
    13. John Stuart Mill (46%)
    14. Jeremy Bentham (45%)
    15. Nel Noddings (42%)
    16. Thomas Hobbes (42%)
    17. Epicureans (37%)
    18. Plato (31%)
    19. Prescriptivism (7%)

  8. #58
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    One thing I notice from looking back through the thread: NO-one likes Prescriptivism...
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  9. #59
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Because Hare was a fool.

  10. #60
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragashree View Post
    One thing I notice from looking back through the thread: NO-one likes Prescriptivism...
    Wiki says:

    Universal prescriptivism (often simply called prescriptivism) is the meta-ethical view which claims that:
    Ethical sentences do not express propositions.
    Instead, ethical sentences function similarly to imperatives which are universalizable — whoever makes a moral judgment is committed to the same judgment in any situation where the same relevant facts obtain.

    This makes prescriptivism a universalist form of non-cognitivism or expressivism. Prescriptivism stands in opposition to other forms of non-cognitivism (such as emotivism and quasi-realism), as well as to all forms of cognitivism (including both moral realism and ethical subjectivism).
    Since the concept was introduced by philosopher R. M. Hare in his 1952 book The Language of Morals, it has been compared to emotivism and to the categorical imperative of Immanuel Kant.[1][2]
    For an illustrative example of the prescriptivist stance, consider the moral sentence "Murder is wrong". According to moral realism, such a sentence claims there to be some objective property of 'wrongness' associated with the act of murder. According to moral relativism, such a sentence simply claims that murder is disapproved of by society. According to emotivism, such a sentence merely expresses an attitude of the speaker; it only means something like "Boo on murder!" But according to prescriptivism, the statement "Murder is wrong" means something more like "Do not murder" — what it expresses is not primarily a description or an emotion, it is an imperative. A value-judgment might also have descriptive and emotive meanings, but these are not its primary meaning on a prescriptivist account.
    Hare would allow utilitarian considerations to enter into such a formulation, but he would not base the formula or his ethical theory solely on a principle of utility. Hare believed that all of our ethical propositions ought to conform with logic.
    Peter Singer has expressed sympathy with Hare's position,[3] though he is more strictly representative of the preference utilitarian school.
    I don't understand. This is nitpicking. If an action is wrong, we should not do it. However, there is a greater context in most moral decisions. Different cultures make different value judgments on things, hence the fact that we have different laws and stoof. So if it's criminal to, for instance, smoke marijuana is one state, it might not be in another. It's not something that can be applied across the board because the board is varied.

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