User Tag List

View Poll Results: Is it ever justified to smack somebody?

Voters
47. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    37 78.72%
  • No

    10 21.28%
First 7891011 Last

Results 81 to 90 of 101

  1. #81
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    Hmmmm....in an ideal world, reasoning and communication would be the best answer, but this isn't an ideal world. For some, a smack down is the only way to reinforce the lesson of unacceptable behaviour and it's consequences. Violence is the only communication some people know.
    A prime example of this is a man making unwanted psyichal sexual advances on a woman i.e. grabbing her breasts, touching her buttocks etc. If the women has made it quite clear verbally she isn't interested, and her friends have made it quite clear verbally also (a warning per se). If the man continues in this unacceptable behaviour, whilst not ideal, it is quite accetable socially at least for a male friend of said women (or the woman herself, if she is able) to "Punish" said man psyichally. I'd dare say he deserved it, but ideal, no.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #82
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    STP
    Posts
    10,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    Hmmmm....in an ideal world, reasoning and communication would be the best answer, but this isn't an ideal world. For some, a smack down is the only way to reinforce the lesson of unacceptable behaviour and it's consequences. Violence is the only communication some people know.
    A prime example of this is a man making unwanted psyichal sexual advances on a woman i.e. grabbing her breasts, touching her buttocks etc. If the women has made it quite clear verbally she isn't interested, and her friends have made it quite clear verbally also (a warning per se). If the man continues in this unacceptable behaviour, whilst not ideal, it is quite accetable socially at least for a male friend of said women (or the woman herself, if she is able) to "Punish" said man psyichally. I'd dare say he deserved it, but ideal, no.
    It would be hilarious for a male to start groping the other man publicly to show the other man what it is like:yim_rolling_on_the_ Of course it would take an extremely secure man to do this in public.

    An eye for an eye and I am talking about uncomfortableness as if you do it back thats what he wants.
    Im out, its been fun

  3. #83
    Phantonym
    Guest

    Default

    My 2 cents.

    Deserve? Sure, everybody deserves some kick in the ass from time to time. Theoretically. Do they deserve to be really hit? No, that's not going to solve anything. If anything, it will only make things worse.

    Is it ever justified to smack somebody?

    Theoretically yes. But, again, it's not justified when it's carried into action. It's their problem if they can't control themselves and it's your problem if you can't control yourself. It's all about choices and how you choose to communicate.



    Whatever, as usual. I really love these threads. I can sit comfortably with my computer and hypothesize and act all high and mighty when in reality...who knows what I'd do, I'd probably beat people to pulp when the situation demands it, I'd lose control and act impulsively, regardless of how moral, merciful or whatever I think I am.

  4. #84
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sky is BLUE! View Post
    No, that's not going to solve anything. If anything, it will only make things worse.

    Is it ever justified to smack somebody?

    t's not justified when it's carried into action. It's their problem if they can't control themselves and it's your problem if you can't control yourself. It's all about choices and how you choose to communicate.
    Can't compute. How is it not justified when it's carried into action? Smacking somebody is a not necessarily out of no control.

  5. #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    STP
    Posts
    10,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    Can't compute. How is it not justified when it's carried into action? Smacking somebody is a not necessarily out of no control.
    I personally wont change my justification anytime physical violence is involved because I dont want to justify violence. I dont want it to become a justified response, I want the action to stay tied to that single situation and the next time a similiar situation comes up I dont want to feel justified that violence is the best solution. Would cause me to stop looking for a better solution.
    Im out, its been fun

  6. #86
    Phantonym
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    Can't compute. How is it not justified when it's carried into action? Smacking somebody is a not necessarily out of no control.
    Um. Because I said so? It made sense in my mind at the time I posted it, I swear. Anyway, me no speak English, don't really feel like getting into a pointless argument so, sorry for leaving you guessing. I am so out of here.

  7. #87
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poki View Post
    I personally wont change my justification anytime physical violence is involved because I dont want to justify violence. I dont want it to become a justified response, I want the action to stay tied to that single situation and the next time a similiar situation comes up I dont want to feel justified that violence is the best solution. Would cause me to stop looking for a better solution.
    I see...
    Quote Originally Posted by Sky is BLUE! View Post
    Um. Because I said so? It made sense in my mind at the time I posted it, I swear. Anyway, me no speak English, don't really feel like getting into a pointless argument so, sorry for leaving you guessing. I am so out of here.
    Forgive me, I'm not trying to argue. My brain is just too slow.

  8. #88
    Phantonym
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    Forgive me, I'm not trying to argue. My brain is just too slow.
    No worries, mine's slower today. I think it deserves a hit...or at least a facepalm.

  9. #89
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    STP
    Posts
    10,501

    Default

    One of the more enduring ideas in psychology, dating back to the time of William James a little more than a century ago, is the notion that human behavior is not the product of a single process, but rather reflects the interaction of different specialized subsystems. These systems, the idea goes, usually interact seamlessly to determine behavior, but at times they may compete. The end result is that the brain sometimes argues with itself, as these distinct systems come to different conclusions about what we should do.

    The major distinction responsible for these internal disagreements is the one between automatic and controlled processes. System 1 is generally automatic, affective and heuristic-based, which means that it relies on mental “shortcuts.” It quickly proposes intuitive answers to problems as they arise. System 2, which corresponds closely with controlled processes, is slow, effortful, conscious, rule-based and also can be employed to monitor the quality of the answer provided by System 1. If it’s convinced that our intuition is wrong, then it’s capable of correcting or overriding the automatic judgments.
    I am working to find another article I came across yesterday that used sensors to monitor activity and shows 2 seperate decision making parts. One which seems controlled and the other reactive.

    I dont believe intuition in this article refers to N. Possibly a combination of external perception combined with internal perception that bypasses a judgement or understanding function. A mental shortcut in a similiar fashion we have physical shortcuts like how a doctor can hit your knee and make your leg jump.
    Im out, its been fun

  10. #90
    Black Magic Buzzard Kra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    912

    Default

    This thread makes me think of the martial art Aikido. Wherein the principle is to neutralize the aggressor, while causing as little (or no) lasting damage to them as possible.

    An interesting principle that can be surprisingly effective in the hands of a practitioner. However, of the resources I've read, awareness is the most trained conflict resolution skill they use. And I do believe that good awareness is pivotal for preemptive conflict resolution. Though it may not always keep you out of trouble, it will drastically reduce your odds of it.

    As I said earlier self-defense is always justified in my mind. The trick is to make it appropriate to the threat, which isn't always easy.
    Function Activity:
    Ni > Te > Ti = Fi > Ne > Si = Fe > Se

Similar Threads

  1. Does the South actually want to be a part of the United States?
    By gromit in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 07-15-2015, 02:41 PM
  2. Quotes to Motivate You to *Get To Work*
    By Usehername in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 09-21-2014, 12:36 PM
  3. Does this sound too good to be true?
    By Savage Idealist in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-02-2011, 05:30 PM
  4. Replies: 44
    Last Post: 10-30-2010, 12:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO