User Tag List

First 6789 Last

Results 71 to 80 of 86

  1. #71
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7,917

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    Like I said, every religious discussion is about fundamentalism with you. :rolli:
    It's the only part I have an issue with. And extremes are always more interesting, who wants to talk about moderates? eww

  2. #72
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7,917

    Default

    Alright I feel like I have to be positive now.

    Episcopalians rule!!!

  3. #73
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    It's the only part I have an issue with.
    Uh huh sure.

  4. #74
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    Isn't the ajblaise party in another thread?

    (p.s. I think him saying Catholics are ok was his way of saying he is scared of you Peguy, wtg!)

  5. #75
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    Much of the right side of the church relies too much on tradition for the sake of tradition and not tradition based upon the bible. I have no problems with tradition in and of itself. I think traditions can be very stabilizing, but they are not on par with with scripture.

    I think many in the center want to avoid controversy and be broadly appealing. In their attempt to do so they break down the gospel to the most simplistic grounds and never develop an understanding of how the bible speaks to all aspects of life.

    I think much of the left have the same concern as the center and desire to be relevant to society. My fear is that much of the left has abandoned the gospel altogether and ignores what scripture plainly teaches. The left want to be compassionate, but they surrender the truth.
    I think this sums up my initial intuition as to why a TypologyCentral "church service" is never going to work.

    There is a reason we have various denoms/parachurch orgs, and it's because in matters of scriptural interpretation and worship, people disagree strongly sometimes... and in terms of practice, people can't suck things up in a way that violates their religious conscience.

    So perhaps religious interpretation/discussion threads can occur, but not a real "church service" per se; the act of filtering out the specifics of various beliefs will result in a general hodgepodge of religious thought and practice that still only appeal to one segment of the group.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChildoftheProphets View Post
    Maybe we'll actually find a way to improve the Body of Christ somehow! (All in good faith of course.)
    People have been trying to improve the Body of Christ for centuries.
    ...But we can't even agree on practical application of the word "love"
    (especially in regards to behavior that one Christian might consider immoral and another does not.)

    I think each generation needs to have fighters, who catalyze discussion and change, but you'd be better prepared to go the long haul and feel fulfilled in a role where you are a "voice calling from the wilderness." (And I'm not even trying to be pessimistic, just realistically this is what catalyzing voices have to deal with regardless of whether they are left or right of middle.)

    1. The most disheartening thing about Christianity today is how artificially big, dysfunctional, and unloving it has become. Denominationalism has created dogmatism, clerical abuse of power, and inter-Christian conflict that distracts believers from helping our communities while simultaneously making us the laughing stock of the secular world. Compared to the intimate house churches of the first-century Christians, the outward structure of our modern faith is unrecognizable.
    I think focusing on the personal intimate relationships would be far more productive than trying to inflict changes on a large public scale through the political arena, but there is a difference in methodology there that has to be overcome. Conservatism is used to being the "standard" in American culture and politics maybe up to the 1950's or so, and then things started to shift; conservatism by nature wants to maintain things as they are. A new conservatism won't be reflecting a multicultural society for years to come, maybe by the time Gen Y comes into true political/cultural power. (Right now we're still in the declining years of the Boomer phase, and Gen X is really starting to grab the reins.)

    2. Society is always changing, and at least in America, it has seemed particularly malleable since 9/11. If this openness to change is just as true for groups within a society as it is for the society itself, now may very well be the time to finish what Martin Luther started: a return to faith based not in buildings or titles, but in relationships and love.
    It's something to work for, but I'm more amazed at how 9/11 only really created a pendulum swing back in the other direction so quickly. The more change that occurs, the more resistance that will be raised.

    Luther had his own issues (including self-flagellation), even if theologically his ideas were more sound. Even when we participate in transcendent ideas, we have trouble incorporating them in realistic ways into our own personal lives.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    Yes Christ came to fulfill the Old Convenant, and upon his sacrifice it was fufilled and then on the new covenant took effect, as he himself stated:

    And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you."
    Luke 22:19-20
    Pretty much, I'm not sure why there is an argument on this point. And then aside from Jesus' comments, we get books like Hebrews talking about Jesus being the heir of Melchizadek, the legendary Jewish high priest, and thus drawing Old and New Covenant together as one.

    I also remember his desperate attempt to prove that the Rapture is a major element of Christian thinking, despite the fact I pointed out that only Dispensationalists believe in it and is not found in any other Christian sect, and that before the 19th century no theologian ever talked of such a thing.
    Ironic -- I just looked up Dispensationalism last week in a discussion with someone else, and I agree with you. I happened to be raised in groups that were Dispensationalist or on the fringes of the heated Rapture debates (although at the time I just thought they were representative of all Christians), so it's sort of refreshing when I had realized there were portions of the Church that just really didn't get hung up on it.

    I think the popularization of the Left Behind series (by Dispensationalist Tim LaHaye -- ironically again, of "four temperament/humor" personality theory) made the Rapture seem far more pervasive in Christianity than it is actually treated. At the church I last went to, the clergy regularly avoided the topic (as not as pertinent to anything), but a preponderance of the members personally seemed absorbed in it.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #76
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer
    I think this sums up my initial intuition as to why a TypologyCentral "church service" is never going to work.
    What exactly is it in my post that you are pointing at?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer
    There is a reason we have various denoms/parachurch orgs, and it's because in matters of scriptural interpretation and worship, people disagree strongly sometimes... and in terms of practice, people can't suck things up in a way that violates their religious conscience.

    So perhaps religious interpretation/discussion threads can occur, but not a real "church service" per se; the act of filtering out the specifics of various beliefs will result in a general hodgepodge of religious thought and practice that still only appeal to one segment of the group.
    I'm in favor of denominationalism. For the same reasons. More importantly I don't think people should have to suck things up for the sake of community when it comes to critical issues like the sacraments. I mean you simply cannot have a local church where half the people believe that babies should be baptized and the others don't... let alone differences in the reason and purpose of baptism.

    I didn't realize this was supposed to be some sort of "online church." I don't think you can have such a thing, because you can't have church in the proper local sense without the administering of the sacraments.

    Nor did I think this was going to be anything on par with a church bible study/small group/cell group whatever you want to call it. Because typically in those situations there is someone designated with authority not just for organizational purposes, but for teaching purposes as well. Here everyone would be equal.

    All I thought this was going to be was a group of people who generally associate themselves with the christian faith meeting together online to discuss scripture and other christian writings on some sort of scheduled basis without the kind of trolling evident in this very thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer
    I think focusing on the personal intimate relationships would be far more productive than trying to inflict changes on a large public scale through the political arena,
    I think this a false choice between the two. What would be terribly effective is if we had both. Of course that means if we are going to build relationships while being politically involved we must practice meekness and try not to come off as ignorant blowhards. I have seen Christian individuals and political groups achieve this.

    RE: Rapture/Dispy stuff

    First of all I am a protestant evangelical and I think belief in the rapture is borderline laughable.

    I think there are far reaching effects of belief in dispy theology (see the conservative view of Israel and our political relations with them). The problem is that most protestant evangelicals, largely non-denoms, are dispensationalists without even knowing it. Which is really unfortunate and sad since dispensationalism is a hermeneutic view. Hermeneutics are kind of important since they are "the study of the study of the bible" or the lens through which you study and understand the Bible. So many people have a view of the bible without even knowing what that view is or the fact that, as Peguy pointed out, their view has only been around for 100 years.

    Even within my own presbyterian denomination I would not be surprised if say 10-15% of regular attendees believed in the rapture despite our denom's stated doctrinal position on the matter. Thanks Tim Lahaye.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  7. #77
    The elder Holmes Mycroft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sp
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    Peguy, considering the number of times the poverty of the philosophical underpinnings of your system of beliefs has been plainly demonstrated by SW (and others), you've what's referred to in common parlance as some nerve to cop that attitude with ajblaise.
    Dost thou love Life? Then do not squander Time; for that's the Stuff Life is made of.

    -- Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, June 1746 --

  8. #78
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,526

    Default

    It seems appropriate to have a Bible Study Group, just is it is appropriate to have a Madrassa to study jihad and martyrdom, just as it is appropriate, as we have, an MBTI Study Group.

    For there is no more evidence for Zeus, Poseidon, the Trinity or Allah than there is for MBTI.

  9. #79
    Senior Member TopherRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    2w3 so/sx
    Posts
    1,273

    Default

    Wow. Hey, I have an idea...let's just try it and see what happens. Sure, chaos is likely, but not definite. Who cares whether it will work or won't, if the OP wants to try a service on TypeC, I say go for it. Maybe it'll give the Christians on here a place to stand and be counted, rather than being shunned or made fun of.
    Love is the point.

  10. #80
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,526

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzcrossed View Post
    Wow. Hey, I have an idea...let's just try it and see what happens. Sure, chaos is likely, but not definite. Who cares whether it will work or won't, if the OP wants to try a service on TypeC, I say go for it. Maybe it'll give the Christians on here a place to stand and be counted, rather than being shunned or made fun of.
    Yes, it would be nice to have Christians stand up and be counted. Just as it would be nice to have Catholics stand up and be counted. Just as it would be nice to have Orthodox stand up and be counted. Just as it would be nice to have Islamists stand up and be counted. And it would be nice to have Judaism, Jainism and Hinduism as well, not to mention Zen.

    But if we all stand up to be counted, there will be no one sitting down.

Similar Threads

  1. First impression of the poster above you.
    By Lady_X in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 4022
    Last Post: 12-08-2017, 02:33 PM
  2. Earth Hour 2010 on the 27th of March at 20.30 till 21.30
    By Amargith in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-21-2010, 10:08 AM
  3. Weekends of sloth
    By JustHer in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 11-10-2009, 11:38 AM
  4. Thoughts after my first year of college
    By sofmarhof in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-14-2009, 09:55 AM
  5. Validity of Drug-Induced Spiritual Experiences
    By Mole in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 04-07-2008, 05:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO