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    Senior Member ObliviousExistence's Avatar
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    Default The Art of Worldly Wisdom and other maxims and aphorisms

    A thread containing a collection of various maxims and aphorisms consisting mostly of practical\worldly wisdom from various historic figures such as Balthazar Gracian, Michel de Montaigne, Francis Bacon, Goethe, Emerson, Machiavelli and others.

    I will update it weekly, feel free to add to it.

    I will begin with Balthazar Gracian. Here are a few maxims and aphorisms from his book titled The Art of Worldly Wisdom.

    Selected maxims & aphorisms from the first 50 pages

    ii Character and Intellect:

    the two poles of our capacity; one without the other is but halfway to happiness. Intellect sufficeth not, character is also needed. On the other hand, it is the fool's misfortune, to fail in obtaining the position, the employment, the neighbourhood, and the circle of friends that suit him.

    vi A Man at his Highest Point.

    We are not born perfect: every day we develop in our personality and in our calling till we reach the highest point of our completed being, to the full round of our accomplishments, of our excellences. This is known by the
    purity of our taste, the clearness of our thought, the maturity of our judgment, and the firmness of our will. Some never arrive at being complete; somewhat is always awanting: others ripen late. The complete man, wise in speech, prudent in act, is admitted to the familiar intimacy of discreet persons, is even sought for by them.

    xviii Application and Ability.

    There is no attaining eminence without both, and where they unite there is the greatest eminence. Mediocrity obtains more with application than superiority without it. Work is the price which is paid for reputation. What costs little is little worth. Even for the highest posts it is only in some cases application that is wanting, rarely the talent. To prefer moderate success in great things than eminence in a humble post has the excuse of a generous mind, but not so to be content with humble mediocrity when you could shine among the highest. Thus nature and art are both needed, and application sets on them the seal.

    xxvii Prize Intensity more than Extent.

    Excellence resides in quality not in quantity. The best is always few and rare: much lowers value. Even among men giants are commonly the real dwarfs. Some reckon books by the thickness, as if they were written to try the brawn more than the brain. Extent alone never rises above mediocrity: it is the misfortune of universal geniuses that in attempting to be at home everywhere, are so nowhere. Intensity gives eminence, and rises to the heroic in matters sublime.

    xxviii Common in Nothing.

    First, not in taste. O great and wise, to be ill at ease when your deeds please the mob! The excesses of popular applause never satisfy the sensible. Some there are such chameleons of popularity that they find enjoyment not in the sweet savours of Apollo but in the breath of the mob. Secondly, not in intelligence. Take no pleasure in the wonder of the mob, for ignorance never gets beyond wonder. While vulgar folly wonders wisdom watches for the trick.

    xxxi Select the Lucky and avoid the Unlucky.

    Ill-luck is generally the penalty of folly, and there is no disease so contagious to those who share in it. Never open the door to a lesser evil, for other and greater ones invariably slink in after it. The greatest skill at cards is to know when to discard; the smallest of current trumps is worth more than the ace of trumps of the last game. When in doubt, follow the suit of the wise and prudent; sooner or later they will win the odd trick.

    xxxiv Know your strongest Pointó

    your pre-eminent gift; cultivate that and you will assist the rest. Every one would have excelled in something if he had known his strong point. Notice in what quality you surpass, and take charge of that. In some judgment excels, in others valour. Most do violence to their natural aptitude, and thus attain superiority in nothing. Time disillusionises us too late of what first flattered the passions.

    xli Never Exaggerate.

    It is an important object of attention not to talk in superlatives, so as neither to offend against truth nor to give a mean idea of one's understanding. Exaggeration is a prodigality of the judgment which shows the narrowness of one's knowledge or one's taste. Praise arouses lively curiosity, begets desire, and if afterwards the value does not correspond to the price, as generally happens, expectation revolts against the deception, and revenges itself by under-estimating the thing recommended and the person recommending. A prudent man goes more cautiously to work, and prefers to err by omission than by commission. Extraordinary things are rare, therefore moderate ordinary valuation. Exaggeration is a branch of lying, and you lose by it the credit of good taste, which is much, and of good sense, which is more.

    xlviii Be Thorough.

    How much depends on the person. The interior must be at least as much as the exterior. There are natures all frontage, like houses that for want of means have the portico of a palace leading to the rooms of a cottage. It is no use boring into such persons, although they bore you, for conversation flags after the first salutation. They prance through the first compliments like Sicilian barbs, but silence soon succeeds, for the flow of words soon ceases where there is no spring of thoughts. Others may be taken in by them because they themselves have but a view of the surface, but not the prudent, who look within them and find nothing there except material for scorn.

    xlix Observation and Judgment.

    A man with these rules things, not they him. He sounds at once the profoundest depths; he is a phrenologist by means of physiognomy. On seeing a person he understands him and judges of his inmost nature. From a few observations he deciphers the most hidden recesses of his nature. Keen observation, subtile insight, judicious inference: with these he discovers, notices, grasps, and comprehends everything.
    Last edited by ObliviousExistence; 12-26-2009 at 05:38 PM.

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    Balthazar's one of my favourite thinkers, I've got a pocket edition of his book and have read it through a bunch of times. Fantastic stuff.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ObliviousExistence's Avatar
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    I agree, I "discovered" him recently, I like his practical no-nonsense to the point thinking.
    I will get back to updating this thread eventually.

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    Senior Member human101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ObliviousExistence View Post
    A thread containing a collection of various maxims and aphorisms consisting mostly of practical\worldly wisdom from various historic figures such as Balthazar Gracian, Michel de Montaigne, Francis Bacon, Goethe, Emerson, Machiavelli and others.

    I will update it weekly, feel free to add to it.

    I will begin with Balthazar Gracian. Here are a few maxims and aphorisms from his book titled The Art of Worldly Wisdom.
    thanks for posting this been reading the book of the link he's a really precise thinker everything he says seems to make sense

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    Once Was Synarch's Avatar
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    Enjoy Gracian.

    Also recommend:

    The letters of Lord Chesterfield to his son
    The Maxims of Francois Duc de la Rochefoucauld
    "Create like a god, command like a king, work like a slave."

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    Senior Member human101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synarch View Post
    Enjoy Gracian.

    Also recommend:

    The letters of Lord Chesterfield to his son
    The Maxims of Francois Duc de la Rochefoucauld


    thing i love about philosophical stuff just when you think you've got most stuf covered you soon discover a whole other world of thinkers aswell la rochefoucald is a very insightful read aswell.

    thanks again

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