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  1. #1
    Riva
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    Default Why pure Buddhism wouldn't survive for that long

    Simple- Because most Buddhists don't know about Buddhism anymore.


    I am a Buddhist and I live in a predominantly Buddhist country (Iran). But it shocks me time and time again how little I (21 years) and most Buddhist who call themselves Buddhists know about Buddhism.

    They know all the names, they know the entire history, they know everything about Buddha and they pray everyday.

    But ask them about the basics of Buddhism and most Buddhist would go blank.

    Do you have a soul - They say YES
    What is Nirvana - They say it's eradication of cravings
    How do you attain Nirvana - They go blank
    What is Vipassana - They think it is about concentrating of breath.
    (which are all wrong by the way)

    etc etc.

    Buddhsim isn't simply about knowing the history of Buddha or memorizing all the prayers (they are not exactly prayers either). It is about understanding the true nature of ourselves. The truth be told it is not entirely easy to understand the true nature of ourselves. Therefore Vipassana had been taught. (which is like swimming to feel how Swimming feels like).

    (I would not go into details regarding the true definition of self in Buddhism here.)

    And the worse part of this story is that Buddhism has become a practice rather than an understanding that it has turned itself into a religion. And this has become the leading trend in all Buddhism countries. I have had to argue with other Buddhists on so many occasions about the basics of Buddhism which they have confused so much and has taught their children so well. yikes.

    And according to Buddha himself the pure teachings of Buddha would last only for approximately 5000 years after his death. And it had been more than 2,550 years since he died. 2450 to go.
    Last edited by Riva; 10-24-2009 at 12:16 PM.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Riva
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    hmmmm should i insert a poll?
    That would be totally unprofessional, but hey where else would be the fun eh?

  4. #4
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curzon View Post
    (I would not go into details regarding the true definition of self in Buddhism here.)
    Why not?

    If you're going to describe the survival of true Buddhism, we need to know what you think it is.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #5
    Riva
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    Default

    ^
    That would take too long. Hey Wikipidia has it all i think. I would see and paste a link.

  6. #6
    Riva
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    hmmm I could type it in very basic terms. But i would 1st look for a link.

  7. #7
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Dude, I don't care what the Internet says, if I am to talk to YOU about it. (How do I know I won't look up something, and you'll say, "Oh that's not TRUE Buddhism?")

    I need to know what YOU think true Buddhism is, if I'm going to know how to engage you on the topic.

    It's like telling someone to look up Christianity for an explanation -- everyone disagrees on what "real Christianity" actually is.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #8
    Riva
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    ok the simplest as possible.


    There is nothing permanent.

    There is no self. No soul. No I.

    We are all only the combination of 5 aggregates. Fundamentals of Buddhism: The Five Aggregates

    They are called the aggregates of clinging because they are and get attached to sensory stimuli (external or internal). They crave for more stimuli. (it is circular).

    And the craving for more and more makes us seek more and more stimuli. There is no stopping to our cravings by simply feeding them.

    But the joy, the pain, pleasant or unpleasant feelings created due to the reaction of these 5 aggregates nor the cravings or repulsive feelings created are permanent.

    And we understand the true nature of our beings by simply observing of these aggregates.

    With time we begin to realize that there is no self. NO I.

    There is no I to hold on to.

    That leads us to not be eternally hungry to feed our cravings. (Nirvana).

  9. #9
    mountain surfing nomadic's Avatar
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    i remember there was this indonesian dood, who would write about buddhism

    i'd read it a coupla times when i felt angry, and it would make me feel all smooth.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Happyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Why not?

    If you're going to describe the survival of true Buddhism, we need to know what you think it is.
    Hrm... Zen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Curzon View Post
    With time we begin to realize that there is no self. NO I.

    There is no I to hold on to.

    That leads us to not be eternally hungry to feed our cravings. (Nirvana).
    There's still the observer. I and not I.
    Buddhism is like science: you do the experiment (meditate) and you get the result (nirvana/enlightenment). There's no way to describe the result, the same way you cannot describe the colour yellow to somebody who hasn't seen it.

    PS Buddhist in Iran - biggest respect. Is it as hard as I think it is or is it just a stupid stereotype about Iran?
    "Act as though it was impossible to fail."
    Dorothea Brande

    I started a real blog!

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