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  1. #61
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    1. Neo-Pagan (100&#37 ---> Uuuugh, I hate pagans... I mean I love everyone.
    2. Unitarian Universalism (96%) ---> This is because I am a homo with a secular non-fundamentalist Christian background
    3. Secular Humanism (90%) ---> Is this another way of saying agnostic intellectual who likes making long winded observations on the 'human condition?
    Because, yes.
    4. Liberal Quakers (85%) --> I love Quakers! I posted elsewhere that if I believed in organized religion, I would be a Quaker. Actually if I were a PACIFIST I wold be a Quaker or Unitarian Universalist or Bahai.



    5. New Age (84%) ------------> I am NOT a hippie
    6. Mahayana Buddhism (77%) ---------------> I fit best with the beliefs of SGA Buddhism and would practice Won Buddhism
    7. Taoism (76%) ----------------> Ah, for the laissez-faire bum in me
    8. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (71%) ---------------> This is true
    9. Sikhism (68%) -----------> Thumbs up but too culturally specific for me to get into
    10. Jainism (67%) ---------------> See above But I do like the idea of being a swirling dervish...and yes I know Jainism isn't the same as Sufism
    11. Theravada Buddhism (66%) ---------------> Is this 'pure land' buddhism? because no.
    12. Reform Judaism (64%) -----------------> Well if I ever marry a Jewish person, this is good to know
    13. Bahai Faith (63%) ------------------> You people are lovely but way too pacifist
    14. Nontheist (62%) ---------------> You and your big words
    15. Scientology (60%) ---------------> Fuck that. I can do crazy on my own.
    16. Hinduism (59%) ---------------> I can't keep track of all the deities
    17. New Thought (55%) ---------------> Don't even know what this is
    18. Orthodox Quaker (55%) -----------------> The word 'orthodox' gives me pause
    19. Orthodox Judaism (50%) ----------------> See above
    20. Seventh Day Adventist (38%) ----------------> Hahahaha, NO.
    21. Eastern Orthodox (37%) ----------------> No thanks
    22. Islam (37%) --------------> See above
    23. Roman Catholic (37%) ---------------> See above
    24. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (36%) ---------------> ???
    25. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (34%) --> And be doomed to purgatory? No thanks.
    26. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (32%) --> And go to hell? No thanks.
    27. Jehovah's Witness (17%) --> ...

  2. #62
    The Unwieldy Clawed One Falcarius's Avatar
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    1. Jainism (100&#37
    2. Theravada Buddhism (99%)
    3. Mahayana Buddhism (96%)
    4. Hinduism (84%)
    5. Liberal Quakers (77%)
    6. Orthodox Quaker (77%)
    7. Unitarian Universalism (77%)
    8. Bahá'í Faith (68%)
    9. Orthodox Judaism (67%)
    10. Seventh Day Adventist (67%)
    11. Taoism (65%)
    12. Islam (62%)
    13. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (59%)
    14. Jehovah's Witness (58%)
    15. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (58%)
    16. New Age (56%)
    17. Neo-Pagan (56%)
    18. Secular Humanism (55%)
    19. Sikhism (51%)
    20. Nontheist (50%)
    21. New Thought (46%)
    22. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (46%)
    23. Scientology (44%)
    24. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (43%)
    25. Eastern Orthodox (43%)
    26. Roman Catholic (43%)
    27. Reform Judaism (38%)
    Quote Originally Posted by Thalassa View Post
    Oh our 3rd person reference to ourselves denotes nothing more than we realize we are epic characters on the forum.

    Narcissism, plain and simple.

  3. #63
    Senior Member pocket lint's Avatar
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    Interesting how irl, my beliefs started from the religions at bottom of this list and changed to fit more of the ones at the top, and in the exact order.

    1. Unitarian Universalism (100&#37
    2. Theravada Buddhism (99%)
    3. Liberal Quakers (89%)
    4. Secular Humanism (88%)
    5. Taoism (82%)
    6. Mahayana Buddhism (78%)
    7. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (66%)
    8. Neo-Pagan (64%)
    9. New Age (59%)
    10. Nontheist (55%)
    11. Jainism (51%)
    12. Hinduism (49%)
    13. Scientology (48%)
    14. Sikhism (48%)
    15. New Thought (47%)
    16. Orthodox Quaker (44%)
    17. Reform Judaism (44%)
    18. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (40%)
    19. Bahá'í Faith (33%)
    20. Seventh Day Adventist (15%)
    21. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (12%)
    22. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (7%)
    23. Jehovah's Witness (6%)
    24. Eastern Orthodox (1%)
    25. Islam (1%)
    26. Orthodox Judaism (1%)
    27. Roman Catholic (1%)

    I was raised Catholic. I was put in catechism for 6 years and forced to go to mass every week until I was 18. --> Had an obsession with the occult around ages 16-18. --> I took two anthropology classes in college... learning about evolution opened up my mind. I was interested in atheism. --> Then, beginning of last year up until April of this year (ages 18-20), I went back to read the bible for myself. I attended a Southern Baptist church for a year and studied the bible with a teacher regularly a couple times a week. I was pressured into being baptized. I never accepted Christianity as my religion, but I still think I was somehow programmed to think, feel, and act like the rest. I soon realized that I was living a double life. For a while, I deceived everyone (even myself) that accepted the Bible as my truth. I still had too many questions. --> A few months after I left the Baptist church, I went to more liberal/non-denominational churches... they seemed more confused that I was. [A bunch of detailed missing] I decided to leave Christianity behind. --> Hah... then, I attended a Unitarian Universalist church for six Sundays two months ago. I am pretty sure that most of the people I met there are intuitives (probably NF). I like it there because I am amongst knowledge/"truth" seekers who are open-minded, but like most congregations there is too much socializing for me to want to stick around. I asked myself why I needed to be there... the only reason I could think of is because I still wanted something to fill my new spiritual void. --> FINALLY, I have a mind of my own... at least I believe I do! I take responsibilities for my actions. What I observe and experience helps me understand that understanding for me is just living and accepting the present moment. The world looks new every day, there is much to explore out there! To me, the meaning of life is to give it meaning to carry on and find meanings along the way .

  4. #64
    Senior Member pocket lint's Avatar
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    While I was doing research on MBTI last year, I found this one Unitarian Universalist sermon that talked about MBTI types and spiritualities.

    1. The Journey of Unity


    This journey is for those who seek to have a set of great organizing principles to help them understand life. There is an ongoing search for clarity and truth and often a bent toward western scientific thinking. Their focus is on the global past and the future (not the present). There is a concern for justice in the world. About 12% of the population resonates readily with this path. (NT)The Hindu yoga of "knowledge" (Jnana yoga) is a fairly direct parallel to this path.

    For each journey Rev. Richardson pointed to two mentors, two guides for the journey. For the Journey of Unity the guides are the Buddha and Buckminster Fuller. You likely have some awareness of Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, so let me say a word or two about Buckminster Fuller. Fuller developed his own original philosophical system. He sought to think through reality and find a design which would help explain the universe and live more effectively in it. He called himself a "design scientist" and his work had implications for equitable welfare, a just distribution of resources and opportunities for all people.

    What spirituality would look like for those on this journey could be, in Joseph Campbell’s words, a "bliss station." - a place and/or time to be alone to think and reflect. The Greek temple and the New England meeting house - with the emphasis on rational symmetry and balance well reflect this Journey of Unity. In some Eastern temples or gardens it is difficult to know where nature ends and human work begins.

    Key words are, clarity, systems, principles. These are the philosophers and professors who design the temple.
    2. The Journey of Devotion


    This is the most readily tangible and specific journey, involving direct experiences or highly prescribed behavior. Those on this journey were probably gentle and co-operative as children and turn into sensitive and helpful adults. They have a focus on the immediate present, seeing that each detail is properly cared for. Those on this journey will see the importance of pilgrimage - of visiting special places, such as Mecca or Lourdes. They appreciate heroes and those who have undergone rigorous quests, relishing in those stories. They appreciate simple things and the direct approach, with all things done in good order and taste. Their service will likely be direct and personal. The practice of Bhakti yoga (the yoga of love or devotion) most closely parallels this journey. What is important is relationship. (This is SF) Often there is a strong oral component to education.

    The mentors for this journey are Mohammed and St. Francis.

    Mohammed spoke of a practical, down-to-earth, highly structured spirituality. The word "Islam" means "peace and submission," or "peace through submission." There is comforting and unambiguous tradition. All of life is enclosed within guidelines - bankers are not to charge interest, the needy are to be helped, there is to be no racism.

    St. Francis had a similar concern for directly helping people and is sometimes known as the "ecological saint" - seeing all of life as deriving from one Source, God as Creator

    Key concepts here are: service, stories, piety, charisma, experience, passionate . These are the priests who celebrate the temple.
    3. The Journey of Works


    Some children are always in motion, testing everything, asking, "why?" They grow up to be realists, always in touch with the facts, thinking in a straight, linear way, reasoning from premise to conclusion. Fairness is a trademark, a life-time of productive work is essential. Rather than doing direct service, these folks build institutions to help others. These folks enjoy working with their hands, learning on the job, relishing in technical tasks. After something is clear to them, their motto is, "get on with it" They appreciate major codes - such as that of Hammurabi. There is a focus on righteousness, responsibility, realism. Their hymn would be "Battle Hymn of the Republic." Karma Yoga parallels this journey - work dedicated to God is the equivalent of prayer. Remember Gandhi saying, "work is worship." At the same time there is "non-attachment" to one’s work, making Karma yoga the most difficult. All the while one is working responsibly, perhaps accumulating wealth, one isn’t to be tempted to put those in front of disinterested sacrifice. One works, but isn’t personally invested in seeing that one’s own perspective is adopted by all others. About 38% of people are of this style (ST)

    Mentors for this Journey are Moses and Confucius. Both were concerned with an orderly society, with proper administration, organized in great detail, with identity as a core consideration and proper boundaries as crucial. Right and wrong were clear, obvious, and had concrete practicality to them. It is more important to learn the appropriate behavior than to learn a different way of doing things. Confucius started with the most tangible tasks of ritual and music, moved on to elaborate an ethical system, then to consideration of harmony in society.

    Those on this journey are often the proprietors of the temple and caretakers of the institution. When they are in charge things are clear, well-defined, and in good repair! These folks give religion definition, parameters, plans, and rules.

    Key concepts are: responsibility, identity, laws & proverbs, dutiful. These are the proprietors who run the temple.
    4. The Journey of Harmony


    Of each of the four journeys this is the most adaptable. As children these folks had a wonder world, with creativity and mystery on every hand. As adults they are concerned for consensus building and are often effective communicators. About 12% of the population are on this path, about 44% of clergy. Here are the world’s idealists, combining a future orientation with a concern for the well-being of other people. Life is a self-creating process, with the emphasis on process more than becoming. There is such an emphasis on the future and new possibilities, dreaming of what could be, to the extent that, sometimes, there is a lack of follow-through in the present! Mysticism provides a way to approach the reality which underlies all existence. Complexities in life are balanced by expectations that all will eventually be well. Raja yoga, working primarily with the mind, seeing progress as a scientific experiment, parallels this journey. (NF)

    Mentors are Tagore and Jesus of Nazareth.

    Tagore was an Indian poet, resonating with the mystic harmony of the world, feeling that education must begin in the heart of the student, not in the curriculum of the administration. Jesus of Nazareth, homeless wanderer, itinerant teacher, combining healing, teaching, and eating, empowering those who would follow.

    Spiritual practices along this journey may include keeping a journal, practicing integral yoga, Tai Chi, Sufi dancing. Robert Frost’s poem entitled "The Road Less Traveled" well reflects this path.

    Some key phrases are: experiment, ideal, wonderful, community, search for meaning. These are the prophets who inspire the temple.
    Last edited by pocket lint; 11-14-2007 at 06:13 PM.

  5. #65
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    I do not remember the specific content enough, but this sounds a great deal like my Soultypes book I recommended to Usehername a week or two ago. What I like about these is that it refers to patterns in general spirituality, rather than talking in terms of one particular faith system.

    (If not that one, there is also a book I have called Four Spiritualities, that focus on the four archetypes and perhaps uses the journey motif... maybe these excerpts were taken from or inspired by it? I wish I could remember...)
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #66
    Senior Member aeon's Avatar
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    Thank you for that post, pocket lint. I very much enjoyed reading it and where it led my thoughts.


    cheers,
    Ian

  7. #67
    Senior Member pocket lint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I do not remember the specific content enough, but this sounds a great deal like my Soultypes book I recommended to Usehername a week or two ago. What I like about these is that it refers to patterns in general spirituality, rather than talking in terms of one particular faith system.

    (If not that one, there is also a book I have called Four Spiritualities, that focus on the four archetypes and perhaps uses the journey motif... maybe these excerpts were taken from or inspired by it? I wish I could remember...)
    You are correct. The excerpts were taken from the UU sermon that I linked, which was inspired by the book Four Spiritualities by Peter Tufts Richardson, who happens to be a UU minister.

    Quote Originally Posted by aeon View Post
    Thank you for that post, pocket lint. I very much enjoyed reading it and where it led my thoughts.


    cheers,
    Ian
    It is my pleasure!

  8. #68
    Junior Member Pangolin's Avatar
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    I generally regard myself as a pantheist, which you might think of as a naturalistic Taoist (Taoism being a classical as opposed to modern form of pantheism).


    1. Unitarian Universalism (100%)
    2. Liberal Quakers (90%)
    3. Neo-Pagan (89%)
    4. Taoism (85%)
    5. Secular Humanism (84%)
    6. Theravada Buddhism (81%)
    7. New Age (77%)
    8. Mahayana Buddhism (72%)
    9. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (69%)
    10. Nontheist (68%)
    11. Hinduism (58%)
    12. Scientology (54%)
    13. Jainism (51%)
    14. Orthodox Quaker (51%)
    15. New Thought (50%)
    16. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (45%)
    17. Sikhism (42%)
    18. Reform Judaism (38%)
    19. Seventh Day Adventist (32%)
    20. Bah�'� Faith (30%)
    21. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (20%)
    22. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (19%)
    23. Eastern Orthodox (10%)
    24. Islam (10%)
    25. Orthodox Judaism (10%)
    26. Roman Catholic (10%)
    27. Jehovah's Witness (6%)

  9. #69
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Interesting test, Jennifer!


    1. Orthodox Quaker (100&#37
    2. Liberal Quakers (86%)
    3. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (84%)
    4. Unitarian Universalism (79%)
    5. Reform Judaism (77%)
    6. Bahá'í Faith (74%)
    7. Islam (72%)
    8. Orthodox Judaism (72%)
    9. Seventh Day Adventist (71%)
    10. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (70%)
    11. Sikhism (70%)
    12. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (66%)
    13. Eastern Orthodox (64%)
    14. Roman Catholic (64%)
    15. Jainism (63%)
    16. Theravada Buddhism (62%)
    17. Mahayana Buddhism (60%)
    18. Neo-Pagan (58%)
    19. Hinduism (55%)
    20. New Age (54%)
    21. Secular Humanism (51%)
    22. Jehovah's Witness (50%)
    23. Taoism (46%)
    24. Scientology (44%)
    25. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (36%)
    26. Nontheist (34%)
    27. New Thought (34%)
    eNFJ 4w3 sx/so 468 tritype
    Neutral Good
    EII-Fi subtype, Ethical/Empath, Delta/Beta
    RLUEI, Choleric/Melancholic
    Inquistive/Limbic
    AIS Holland code
    Researcher: VDI-P
    Dramatic>Sensitive>Serious

  10. #70
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    In my complicated state, I consider myself to "fit" in these few categories, well aware that they are contradictory ones. I'm a practicing Episco-Catholic, but I'm also kind of an atheist and pluralist.

    1. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (100&#37
    2. Liberal Quakers (96%)
    3. Unitarian Universalism (92%)
    4. Orthodox Quaker (74%)
    5. New Age (67%)
    6. Neo-Pagan (62%)
    7. Reform Judaism (59%)
    8. Hinduism (58%)
    9. Seventh Day Adventist (53%)
    10. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (52%)
    11. Secular Humanism (51%)
    12. New Thought (50%)
    13. Mahayana Buddhism (50%)
    14. Sikhism (50%)
    15. Bahá'í Faith (47%)
    16. Taoism (45%)
    17. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (44%)
    18. Eastern Orthodox (44%)
    19. Roman Catholic (44%)
    20. Scientology (44%)
    21. Theravada Buddhism (36%)
    22. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (35%)
    23. Orthodox Judaism (33%)
    24. Nontheist (30%)
    25. Jainism (28%)
    26. Islam (27%)
    27. Jehovah's Witness (23%)
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

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