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  1. #1
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    Default To Become a God... eliminate desire

    Can anyone comment on the Buddhist concept of eliminating desires in order to achieve enlightenment? I believe they have an EXTREMELY valid point with that one. As far as I see it, desire is perhaps the root of all suffering. Feeling the lack of that which you desire is the suffering that we all own with such zealousness.

    Why does Buddhism teach the elimination of desire? - Yahoo! Answers

  2. #2
    rawr Costrin's Avatar
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    Hmm... interesting. I'll try it out.
    I think the first desire I'll get rid of is the desire to get rid of my desires.


    But yeah, I agree (with the eliminating suffering, becoming a god, no). Without desire, there would be no reason to be sad. Although it is likely impossible to completely rid oneself of desire, one could probably rid oneself of quite a bit.
    "All humour has a foundation of truth."
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  3. #3
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    It's a matter of accepting the reality of life rather than desiring things that are beyond you.

    It also ties into the concept of living in the now, rather than living either in the painful past or the unrealized future. When you live in the current moment and embrace the totality of it, you are able to experience life as it is unfolding around you -- letting go of the past moment and accepting the next moment as it comes into being.

    Much of what is pain to us is because we are either chasing things that do not yet exist or refusing to let go of things whose times are past. Time flows like a river and we flow within it, we are the water drop, we are the river, we are part of the movement rather than apart from it.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #4
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    It's a matter of accepting the reality of life rather than desiring things that are beyond you.

    It also ties into the concept of living in the now, rather than living either in the painful past or the unrealized future. When you live in the current moment and embrace the totality of it, you are able to experience life as it is unfolding around you -- letting go of the past moment and accepting the next moment as it comes into being.

    Much of what is pain to us is because we are either chasing things that do not yet exist or refusing to let go of things whose times are past. Time flows like a river and we flow within it, we are the water drop, we are the river, we are part of the movement rather than apart from it.
    Pretty nicely said.

    Costrin's right, though. If you're desiring to eliminate suffering (by eliminating desires), you're still desiring, and you're still trying. The Buddhist concept of desire isn't about desiring to eat lunch or poop in the toilet rather than in your pants. "Desire" is better translated as thirst. You're thirsting for something to be different about your situation.

    P.S. Buddha wasn't a God, just a teacher.

  5. #5
    Senior Member velocity's Avatar
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    all these religions are about the submission of the ego
    /next

  6. #6
    Senior Member professor goodstain's Avatar
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    When i was young someone once explained to me-"When one dies and goes to heaven they rest there adoring God forever. They are completely content. Which gives them the ability to rest in patients in their adoration. When the soul leaves the body it no longer has desire. It is content."
    everyone uses every function about evenly. take NE for example. if there are those who don't use it much, then why are there such massive amounts of people constantly flowing through Wallmart with 20 items or less?

  7. #7
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    Does not the elimination of all things unnecessary to your being exalt you above the mental state of most other people in your ability to to see the way past suffering, past the miserable existence the linen share of the species is a part of, and into another state of being altogether? Is the Buddhist who finds himself walking down the path not freed of the limitations of free will set by man's basic nature? We are all trapped in seeking something, things that matter not in the grand schema of of life, things that are only basic in fulfilling desires even the most primitive animals have. The desires that bring us to social interaction and macro level social orders are all driven by these base and instinctual desires. In other words, these desires serve no purpose, and are not constrained to any ultimate goal or order. These menial desires are the essence of chaos within the human psyche. To eliminate them and make all desires and wishes that remain subservient to one ultimate goal/desire in a grand consolidation is perhaps the greatest way to eliminate the chaos. Nothing should exist as a desire or an end within itself, but all shall be the means to a greater directive that binds the will into a pristine and singular focus. That one goal never dies, it never sleeps, and the hunger for it always exists. But rather, unlike the chaotic desires of the past, this never ceasing desire should be filled through the realization of all lower desires that comprise it, which were once disjointed from an ultimate purpose. To gain fulfillment in one is to move closer towards the ultimate. The ultimate may always be far off, but by riding upon the concerted drive of all lower desires, that ultimate goal should always be in a state of fulfillment.

    This greater goal must be vast enough to encompass all, and thus must either be above the plight of human beings (a heavenly/godly or lofty directive...) or an all pervading desire that can consolidate all others unto itself. I contend that love and power are such ultimate desires. This is why absolute power is said to corrupt absolutely. The thirst for power has no beginning and no end. It is the alpha and the omega. Every desire can be be made to work towards one core desire, the search for power. Every step towards fullfilling one's desires can become a step towards forward in an unceasing yearning for one single thing. Both the thirst and the pleasure become unending.

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    Costrin's right, though. If you're desiring to eliminate suffering (by eliminating desires), you're still desiring, and you're still trying.
    Heh, that is always the problem, isn't it?

    Trying not to try is still trying.
    Being is another matter entirely.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  9. #9
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    I change my mind. In assuming that all things can be made subservient to one desire, and thus suffering and chaos eliminated under its undivided rule, I am brought back to the order of Kabbalistic desires. After power is knowledge, and after knowledge is the spiritual desire which is entangled with "love", the purely altruistic desire (or desire for altruism as it were). In reexamining what i just stated, I am forced to remind myself that when people reach a certain plateau of power, they can no longer be fulfilled by the quest for power whether it be because they can seek no more power or because they simply tire of it. Thus power IS NOT an unending desire. Rather, it is the higher spiritual desires (and love) which can carry on into eternity or the full extent of the individual's existence.

  10. #10
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    I realize I wrote down these thoughts while on something like a high, but does anyone have any thoughts? Perhaps this link will explain the conclusions I came to in a way you might be able to understand. It is the Kabbalistic principle of filling desires, which I believe is more akin to the true meaning behind the Buddhist "elimination of desires", and the same process that I have ascertained from my own analysis of the motivations behind mankind.

    Kabbalah World Center - Science and Kabbalah - The Alternative of Our Life

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