User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 23

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    336

    Default Why is ideology like a prism?

    Why is ideology like a prism?

    Webster says a prism is “a medium that distorts, slants, or colors whatever is viewed through it”.

    It appears to me that Marx was the first great thinker to have coined the word “ideology”. Ideology is a distinctive form of reasoning about the individual and about the individual in society. Ideology is a systematically biased mode of thinking. Ideologies vary extensively in so far as the idioms used, the extent of bias, the degree of sophistication, the manner in which bias permeates various aspects of theory, and so on.

    While ideologies vary widely in certain aspects all ideologies share some common characteristics. An identifiable logical structure is shared by all. This structure includes: 1) a moral dimension, 2) it is biased toward a specific group and is biased against those out side this group, 3) an ideology cannot not directly defend it self because it rests on assumptions that have never been critically examined or even formulated, and 4) Marx believes these assumptions to be “nothing more than the intellectual ‘transcripts’ of the conditions of existence of the social group whose point of view it reflects”.

    Like viewing the world through a prism, the ideologue experiences the world in a distorted manner. “What a man does not transcend in reality, he cannot effectively transcend in thought either. The limits of his existence are the limits of his thoughts. His basic assumptions are therefore ultimately nothing but his conditions of existence ‘reproduced’ in thought.”

    Quotes from Marx’s Theory of Ideology Bhikhu Parekh

  2. #2
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    There is no outside of power.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  3. #3
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Well, it's like a prism because humankind hasn't been able to ascend to a level that is above idealogy. And most likely never will, but that's beside the point. :P

    What I believe is more important is asking yourself what has more impact on you. The prism with which you view the world, or the 6 billion other prisms with which the rest of the world sees through. You can strive a perfect idealogy, but if you want to co-exist, it's meaningless unless it fits the idealogies of the rest of the world.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Well, it's like a prism because humankind hasn't been able to ascend to a level that is above idealogy. And most likely never will, but that's beside the point. :P

    What I believe is more important is asking yourself what has more impact on you. The prism with which you view the world, or the 6 billion other prisms with which the rest of the world sees through. You can strive a perfect idealogy, but if you want to co-exist, it's meaningless unless it fits the idealogies of the rest of the world.

    Ideology is one of the world's greatest problems. It can only be diminished by a population that has learned Critical Thinking.

  5. #5
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    8,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coberst View Post
    Ideology is one of the world's greatest problems. It can only be diminished by a population that has learned Critical Thinking.
    Unless what we call Critical Thinking is itself an ideology based on the assumption that what our reason comes up with when following that process is the best way to proceed, and then we're back where we started.

    Don't you just love how the human mind is limited to relative kinds of awareness?

  6. #6
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coberst View Post
    It appears to me that Marx was the first great thinker to have coined the word “ideology”.
    Actually it was Destutt de Tracy who coined the term in 1801.

    I certainly agree that ideology is a major problem of the modern world.

  7. #7
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    Unless what we call Critical Thinking is itself an ideology based on the assumption that what our reason comes up with when following that process is the best way to proceed, and then we're back where we started.

    Don't you just love how the human mind is limited to relative kinds of awareness?

    Our relative kinds of awareness open the illusive door to the universe for us, but at the same time, it buries us beneath it.

    Pandora's box. :>

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    Unless what we call Critical Thinking is itself an ideology based on the assumption that what our reason comes up with when following that process is the best way to proceed, and then we're back where we started.

    Don't you just love how the human mind is limited to relative kinds of awareness?
    CT is an acronym for Critical Thinking. Everybody considers themselves to be a critical thinker. That is why we need to differentiate among different levels of critical thinking.

    Most people fall in the category that I call Reagan thinkers—trust but verify. Then there are those who have taken the basic college course taught by the philosophy dept that I call Logic 101. This is a credit course that teaches the basic principles of reasoning. Of course, a person need not take the college course and can learn the matter on their own effort, but I suspect few do that.

    The third level I call CT (Critical Thinking). CT includes the knowledge of Logic 101 and also the knowledge that focuses upon the intellectual character and attitude of critical thinking. It includes knowledge regarding the ego and social centric forces that impede rational thinking.

    Most decisions we have to make are judgment calls. A judgment call is made when we must make a decision when there is no “true” or “false” answers. When we make a judgment call our decision is bad, good, or better.

    Many factors are involved: there are the available facts, assumptions, skills, knowledge, and especially personal experience and attitude. I think that the two most important elements in the mix are personal experience and attitude.

    When we study math we learn how to use various algorithms to facilitate our skill in dealing with quantities. If we never studied math we could deal with quantity on a primary level but our quantifying ability would be minimal. Likewise with making judgments; if we study the art and science of good judgment we can make better decisions and if we never study the art and science of judgment our decision ability will remain minimal.

    I am convinced that a fundamental problem we have in this country (USA) is that our citizens have never learned the art and science of good judgment. Before the recent introduction of CT into our schools and colleges our young people have been taught primarily what to think and not how to think. All of us graduated with insufficient comprehension of the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary for the formulation of good judgment. The result of this inability to make good judgment is evident and is dangerous.

    I am primarily interested in the judgment that adults exercise in regard to public issues. Of course, any improvement in judgment generally will affect both personal and community matters.

    To put the matter into a nut shell:
    1. Normal men and women can significantly improve their ability to make judgments.
    2. CT is the domain of knowledge that delineates the knowledge, skills, and intellectual character demanded for good judgment.
    3. CT has been introduced into our schools and colleges slowly in the last two or three decades.
    4. Few of today’s adults were ever taught CT.
    5. I suspect that at least another two generations will pass before our society reaps significant rewards resulting from teaching CT to our children.
    6. Can our democracy survive that long?
    7. I think that every effort must be made to convince today’s adults that they need to study and learn CT on their own. I am not suggesting that adults find a teacher but I am suggesting that adults become self-actualizing learners.
    8. I am convinced that learning the art and science of Critical Thinking is an important step toward becoming a better citizen in today’s democratic society.

  9. #9
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coberst View Post
    CT is an acronym for Critical Thinking. Everybody considers themselves to be a critical thinker. That is why we need to differentiate among different levels of critical thinking.

    Most people fall in the category that I call Reagan thinkers—trust but verify. Then there are those who have taken the basic college course taught by the philosophy dept that I call Logic 101. This is a credit course that teaches the basic principles of reasoning. Of course, a person need not take the college course and can learn the matter on their own effort, but I suspect few do that.

    The third level I call CT (Critical Thinking). CT includes the knowledge of Logic 101 and also the knowledge that focuses upon the intellectual character and attitude of critical thinking. It includes knowledge regarding the ego and social centric forces that impede rational thinking.

    Most decisions we have to make are judgment calls. A judgment call is made when we must make a decision when there is no “true” or “false” answers. When we make a judgment call our decision is bad, good, or better.

    Many factors are involved: there are the available facts, assumptions, skills, knowledge, and especially personal experience and attitude. I think that the two most important elements in the mix are personal experience and attitude.

    When we study math we learn how to use various algorithms to facilitate our skill in dealing with quantities. If we never studied math we could deal with quantity on a primary level but our quantifying ability would be minimal. Likewise with making judgments; if we study the art and science of good judgment we can make better decisions and if we never study the art and science of judgment our decision ability will remain minimal.

    I am convinced that a fundamental problem we have in this country (USA) is that our citizens have never learned the art and science of good judgment. Before the recent introduction of CT into our schools and colleges our young people have been taught primarily what to think and not how to think. All of us graduated with insufficient comprehension of the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary for the formulation of good judgment. The result of this inability to make good judgment is evident and is dangerous.

    I am primarily interested in the judgment that adults exercise in regard to public issues. Of course, any improvement in judgment generally will affect both personal and community matters.

    To put the matter into a nut shell:
    1. Normal men and women can significantly improve their ability to make judgments.
    2. CT is the domain of knowledge that delineates the knowledge, skills, and intellectual character demanded for good judgment.
    3. CT has been introduced into our schools and colleges slowly in the last two or three decades.
    4. Few of today’s adults were ever taught CT.
    5. I suspect that at least another two generations will pass before our society reaps significant rewards resulting from teaching CT to our children.
    6. Can our democracy survive that long?
    7. I think that every effort must be made to convince today’s adults that they need to study and learn CT on their own. I am not suggesting that adults find a teacher but I am suggesting that adults become self-actualizing learners.
    8. I am convinced that learning the art and science of Critical Thinking is an important step toward becoming a better citizen in today’s democratic society.
    Hmmm...I think formulating CT into "judgment making" is an interesting idea. Sounds like the rhetorical education program of Isocrates (he thought, like Aristotle, that by habituating students to making judgments in contingent circumstances, they would gain practical wisdom and become more virtuous citizens)! I'm not sure, though, that this would necessarily help one get outside of ideology or dismantle power. It would rather help one to be more active in shaping the system in which one finds his/her self.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  10. #10
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    You also cannot forget the importance of geniune human relationships within society. Ideologies tend to thrive in mass atomized societies.

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] Why is ISTP like NT?
    By RaptorWizard in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 11:55 AM
  2. Why is ‘abstract idea’ like Wikipedia?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-11-2009, 12:44 PM
  3. Why is Philosophy like General Motors?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-28-2009, 11:00 AM
  4. INTP...Now I know why I really like Cold Play
    By Tekhed in forum Welcomes and Introductions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-18-2008, 08:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO