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  1. #71
    Furry Critter with Claws Kiddo's Avatar
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    The fundamental difference I see between the Judeo-Christan ethic and the Buddhist ethic is in regards to self regulation of desire.

    The former thinks in terms of sin and temptation. They see a natural order ordained by God and it is human's duty to live in accordance with it by resisting any desire to sway from it. Therefore humans must fight, control, reject, and effectively remain ever vigilant in their crusade against sinful desire.

    Whereas the latter thinks in terms of outcomes. They see the attempt to reject or control desire as a desire in itself. And thus they focus on moderation and the acceptance of the futility of trying to conquer desire. Hence yielding, letting go, acceptance, and nonattachment are the tenets of Buddhist living,

    Jesus has some incredibly similar practices to the Buddhists. However, Paul and others interpreted much of what he did in terms of the Old Testament and I think a lot of that has been lost. All I know is the more I have learned about nature and how ignorant human's conception of the "natural order" has been over the centuries, the more I realize the latter method makes sense in light of what Jesus actually said himself.
    Quote Originally Posted by Silently Honest View Post
    OMNi: Wisdom at the cost of Sanity.

  2. #72
    Buddhist Misanthrope Samvega's Avatar
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    “Believe nothing merely because you have been told it. Do not believe what your teacher tells you merely out of respect for the teacher. But whatsoever, after due examination and analysis, you find to be kind, conducive to the good, the benefit, the welfare of all beings - that doctrine believe and cling to, and take it as your guide.”

    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense."

    — Buddha
    Millions of Africa Americans are Christians today because their ancestors were converted against their will to the religion of the slave-master.

    Hundred of thousands of American Indians are Christians today because the Christian missionaries converted their ancestors against their will.

    In Europe, it was the same thing. When Rome controlled most of the world, the Roman Emperor, Constantine, in 325 CE forced Christianity onto his subjects.

    The people of Lithuania did not become Christians because they read the Gospels and decided to accept their teachings. On the contrary, the people of Lithuania were forced into Christianity against their will, as a result of relentless military force.
    I don't deny that Jesus the Man and Buddha the man may have had many of the same values, ideas, beliefs and so on but what the men that followed them decided to do with those teachings is vastly different.

    I personally believe Jesus would be INCREDIBLY disappointed with what has been done with and to his teachings where as Siddhartha Gautama by contrast would be very proud to see them being followed and practiced much the way they were some 2,600 years ago.

  3. #73
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Watch the movie "The man from earth". It covers this in a very interesting way.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    Like Babylon Candle tried to explain, Buddhism and Christianism are NOT AT ALL the same religion, with the same teachings and ideologies.

    Usually, the Western world understands nothing about the concept of "nothingness" that is prevalent in Buddhism. They would even find it terrifying, believe me, since the aim is to feel nothing. No hate, no love, nothing... so that "we" could disappear forever and for good.
    So far Blackmail! is the one who has given the best description of Buddhism coming from a non Buddhist in this whole forum.

    Nothingness!!!!

    Perfect description..

    ----

    Off topic.

    Professors/ Lecturers are such slackers, nothing more to do than lecture for 2 hours and read their eyes off when in the mood. Cool job description these lecturers have.

  5. #75
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    hmm... Nothingness? I perceive it a little differently.

    The middle pathway, of the warrior...being ruled by neither thought nor emotion. An opportunity for self-mastery...a chance to experience life by riding the wave.

    vs. being drowned by digging one's feet into an unrealistic sand.

    I'm not a Buddhist per se...but I do listen to some of the instructors on audio. Among other things I find, that I can self-identify with vs. accepting as dogma.

  6. #76
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curzon View Post
    So far Blackmail! is the one who has given the best description of Buddhism coming from a non Buddhist in this whole forum.

    Nothingness!!!!

    Perfect description..

    ----

    Off topic.

    Professors/ Lecturers are such slackers, nothing more to do than lecture for 2 hours and read their eyes off when in the mood. Cool job description these lecturers have.
    shunyata is often or usually translated as "emptiness", or "suchness", or sometimes as "nothingness" which is an alternate word for nothingness

  7. #77
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    hmm... Nothingness? I perceive it a little differently.

    The middle pathway, of the warrior...being ruled by neither thought nor emotion. An opportunity for self-mastery...a chance to experience life by riding the wave.

    vs. being drowned by digging one's feet into an unrealistic sand.

    I'm not a Buddhist per se...but I do listen to some of the instructors on audio. Among other things I find, that I can self-identify with vs. accepting as dogma.
    The Buddha, and others, looked into the fundamental nature of reality and, in the language of Buddhism, basically discovered that there isn't one.

    All things lack fundamental or intrinsic essence. All phenomena are compounds of other phenomena. "All conditioned forms are temporary, strive on with diligence" is the supposed last words of the buddha on his deathbed. Nothing is intrinsic or fundamental.

    "It is just this, just this." would be a very typical zen expression of this

  8. #78
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    Somehow I sense that "nothingness" is similar to a recent encounter with "hopelessness."

    Hopelessness in the english language doesn't carry the same nuiance of the experience. Which I found hopelessly liberating.

    bodhichitta!

  9. #79
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    Somehow I sense that "nothingness" is similar to a recent encounter with "hopelessness."

    Hopelessness in the english language doesn't carry the same nuiance of the experience. Which I found hopelessly liberating.

    bodhichitta!
    I don't understand what you are trying to say, nor do I know anything about this "recent encounter with hopelessness." But, for what it is worth, in my 15 years of practicing buddhism I have never encountered the word "hopelessness", either by itself nor as a translation for some other sanskrit or pali word. I have, however, read books of american teachers pointing out that things like "hopelessness" "despair" etc are western misunderstandings of buddhism. "People suffer because they want things to be different than they are. Reality is the way it is, the wise person would do well to understand how it is, and to act in accordance with that" is how I would expect a teacher of buddhism to talk.

    Pema Chodron is a very popular author. Personally I really like Traleg Kyabgon's stuff. There are plenty of others out there as well.

  10. #80
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post

    bodhichitta!
    this word I have heard VERY often however

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