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  1. #21
    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
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    Late to this thread..

    Haven't read any posts, merely skimmed through some.

    I am half Ashkenazi Jew, and half Korean, fwiw, and went to Jewish elementary school for seven years and took Japanese for four, in high school.

    If we are talking genetics here, I would definitely posit that the Askenazi Jews and the Japanese are distinctly separate ethnicities.

    As for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean races, I would theorize that Japan and Korea acted as founder populations of what was originally a Chinese-originated race. Though now, each race is distinctly different.

    I may be wrong, but I do believe that kanji, one of the three forms of Japanese script is exactly the same or similar to Chinese kanji, this sharing of the same ideogramatic language might be indicative of a closer genetic correlation.

    What is lol-worthy, is that someone could easily research this on the internet, right now, but I feel lazy, so I am not gonna do it. :P

    I actually own a book called The Jews and the Japanese, but due to a lack of bookshelf space it got relegated to a box of books in my garage.

    Once again, I did not yet look at the articles, or read the posts, but I would say there are certain cultural aspects that both races share.

    But due to the politically correct environment we live in, I would be fearful to comment on these similarities I have observed.

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  2. #22
    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
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    Ashkenazi Jews - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In an ethnic sense, an Ashkenazi Jew is one whose ancestry can be traced to the Jews of Central and Eastern Europe. For roughly a thousand years, the Ashkenazim were a reproductively isolated population in Europe, despite living in many countries, with little inflow or outflow from migration, conversion, or intermarriage with other groups, including other Jews. Human geneticists have identified genetic variations that have high frequencies among Ashkenazi Jews, but not in the general European population. This is true for patrilineal markers (Y-chromosome haplotypes) as well as for matrilineal markers (mitochondrial haplotypes).[10]

    Since the middle of the 20th century, many Ashkenazi Jews have intermarried, both with members of other Jewish communities and with people of other nations and faiths, while some Jews have also adopted children from other ethnic groups or parts of the world and raised them as Jews. Conversion to Judaism, rare for nearly 2,000 years, has become more common. Jewish women and families who choose artificial insemination often choose a biological father who is not Jewish, to avoid common autosomal recessive genetic diseases. Orthodox religious authorities actually encourage this, because of the danger that a Jewish donor could be a mamzer. Thus, the concept of Ashkenazi Jews as a distinct ethnic people, especially in ways that can be defined ancestrally and therefore traced genetically, has also blurred considerably.

    A study by Michael Seldin, a geneticist at the University of California Davis School of Medicine, found Ashkenazi Jews to be a clear, relatively homogenous genetic subgroup. Strikingly, regardless of the place of origin, Ashkenazi Jews can be grouped in the same genetic cohort that is, regardless of whether an Ashkenazi Jew's ancestors came from Poland, Russia, Hungary, Lithuania, or any other place with a historical Jewish population, they belong to the same ethnic group. The research demonstrates the endogamy of the Jewish population in Europe and lends further credence to the idea of Ashkenazi Jews as an ethnic group. Moreover, though intermarriage among Jews of Ashkenazi descent has become increasingly more common, many Ultra-Orthodox Jews, particularly members Hasidic or Hareidi sects, continue to marry exclusively fellow Ashkenazi Jews. This trend keeps Ashkenazi genes prevalent and will also help researchers further study the genes of Ashkenazi Jews with relative ease. It is also noteworthy that these Ultra-Orthodox Jews often have extremely large families too
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    "A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it." - David Stevens

    "That that is, is. That that is not, is not. Is that it? It is."

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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    Either way, there were Chinese Jews.

    And, I still believe this too.

    Chinese Jews immigrating are the most likely explanation for why there seemed to be wide spread Jewish-like practices in almost every part of ancient Japanese life.

    If you actually take the time to comb through the three long pages of evidence, you will see the pervasive presence on almost every single level. And that warrants it interesting enough to wonder how it came about.
    I read many parts of it, it seems very interesting, but I cannot trust these sources. I have no knowledge f the Japanese rituals and mythology; these links could feed me anything.

    They also do not provide us with the dates of these Jewish and Japanese traditions to see if the association is possible.

    This needs a devil's advocate.

  4. #24
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    Y-Chromosome

    Origin of YAP+ lineages of the human Y-chromosome

    Am J Phys Anthropol. 2000 Jun;112(2):149-58. Related Articles, Links Click here to read Origin of YAP+ lineages of the human Y-chromosome. Bravi CM, Bailliet G, Martinez-Marignac VL, Bianchi NO. Multidisciplinary Institute of Cell Biology (IMBICE), 1900 La Plata, Argentina.

    We screened a total of 841 Y-chromosomes representing 36 human populations of wide geographical distribution for the presence of a Y-specific Alu insert (YAP+ chromosomes). The Alu element was found in 77 cases. We tested 5 biallelic and 8 polyallelic markers in 70 out of the 77 YAP+ chromosomes. We could identify the existence of a hierarchical and chronological structuring of ancestral and derived YAP+ lineages, giving rise to 4 haplogroups, 14 subhaplogroups and 60 haplotypes. Moreover, we propose a monophyletic origin for each one of the YAP+ lineages. Out-of-Africa and out-of-Asia models have been suggested to explain the origin
    -------------------------------

    In this article, only three asian groups (Japanese, Tibetan, Jew), african, and a few European have a genetic marker YAP+ on the non-recombining portion of Y-chromosomes.

    Tibetan (Central Asian): 1 out of 1 sample
    Japanese: 4 out of 13 samples
    Chinese: 0 out of 23 samples
    Laotian: 0 of 7 samples
    Cambodian: 0 out of 3 samples
    South East Asians: 0 out of 16 samples
    South Asians: 0 out of 152 samples
    Jews: 4 out of 18 samples
    Lebanese: 0 out of 2 samples
    Syrian: 0 out of 6 samples
    Melanesian: 0 out of 2 samples
    African: 37 out of 72 samples
    European: 3 out of 68 samples


    Multiple origins of Tibetan Y chromosomes.Qian Y, Qian B, Su B, Yu J, Ke Y, Chu Z, Shi L, Lu D, Chu J, Jin L. Institute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

    The genetic origin of Tibetans was investigated using Y chromosome markers. A total of three populations were studied, two from central Tibet speaking central Tibetan and one from Yunnan speaking Kham. Two dominant paternal lineages (>80%) were identified in all three populations with one possibly from central Asia (YAP+) and the other from east Asia (M122C). We conclude that Tibetan Y chromosomes may have been derived from two different gene pools, given the virtual absence of M122C in central Asia and YAP+ in east Asia, with drift an unlikely mechanism accounting for these observations.

    PMID: 10830914 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  5. #25
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    Misc:

    Yes, there is a genetic and historical connection between a segment of both the Japanese and Jewish populations. The genetic relationship pre-dates the genesis of both cultures, and is a genetic footprint of the original Africans in all of us. What a funny surprise it was for me to learn that I as an American of Okinawan descent had the same y-chromosome variant, (beachcomber yap+), as my American of Polish Jewish descent, (Cohen gene yap-), brother-in-law.
    Also:






    Fig. 2 Maximum-parsimonytree of 44 Y chromosome haplogroups together with their frequencies in Japan and five Asian regions. Samples sizes for each region: Japan 259; northeast Asia (NEA) 441; Southeast Asia (SEA) 683; central Asia (CAS) 419; south Asia (SAS) 496; Oceania (OCE) 209. Major clades (i.e., C??) are labeled with upper case letters to the left of each clade. Mutation names are given along the branches. The length of each branch is not proportional to the number of mutations or the age of the mutation. Dotted lines indicate internal nodes not defined by downstream markers (i.e., paragroups). The names of the 41 haplogroups observed in the present study are shown to the right of the branches. Haplogroup frequencies are shown on the far right, and frequencies of selected Japanese clades are shown within black boxes.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by runvardh View Post
    The Japanese part of my family is heavily Ainu...
    Does your family still follow traditional Ainu customs? I found out that I had some Ainu blood. I am fascinated with the culture. I always thought they were closely related to the Native Americans.
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  7. #27
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    Ainu are a Caucasian people I believe, which in standard everyday terms means they're more related to Whites.

    That was one ideological justification for the Axis alliance between Germany and Japan; claiming the Japanese were long distant "Aryan" cousins. Hitler himself remarked favorably about the Japanese Samurai ethos, claiming it was in full line with Nordic heroism(think Vikings).

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post

    That was one ideological justification for the Axis alliance between Germany and Japan; claiming the Japanese were long distant "Aryan" cousins..
    Ironically the thread is about them being related to Jews.

  9. #29
    にゃん runvardh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by soleil View Post
    Does your family still follow traditional Ainu customs? I found out that I had some Ainu blood. I am fascinated with the culture. I always thought they were closely related to the Native Americans.
    Not really, just a few family recipies. This stuff for me is going to take some time to research.
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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nihilen View Post
    Ironically the thread is about them being related to Jews.
    Oh there's an even more irony on top of that!

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