User Tag List

First 123

Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Meditation

  1. #21
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    2,726

    Default

    I have tried to meditate before but I can't do it, I can't blank out my mind. It's always racing and thinking, so many different ideas running through my head that even falling asleep is a toughy.

    I have even tried to drug my way to successful meditation but even in that state my mind is still racing.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  2. #22
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    I've been meditating for the past six months very regularly. It's something I regularly have to force myself to do, because to be honest, it's hard work. The point of meditation isn't to COMPLETELY empty your mind. That's impossible, because if your mind was completely empty, you wouldn't exist. (I'm currently studying in Buddhist traditions, particularly Zen, though I read a lot of books on Vipassana/Insight Meditation ala Jack Kornfield and Ajahn Chah.) But it would be correct to say that the point of meditation is to calm your mind down and reduce the mental chatter. That's accomplished through building your concentration and building an internal atmosphere that is gentle and forgiving rather than punitive.

    In Zen as in most meditation traditions, you try to focus your mind on a single object. That object could be a mantra (anything works, but in my school they use "clear mind" and "don't know" on the in-breath and out-breath) or the breath, or both. If you use a mantra, you can divide your attention by keeping 90% on your breath -- the sensations you feel as it goes in and out -- and 10% on your mantra, which will become softer as your practice.

    The biggest obstacle you will encounter is distraction. The best thing to do for a beginner is to notice it, name it very softly (planning, worrying, doubting myself, pain, restlessness, thinking, analysis, anger, whatever's going on) and gently and smoothly move your attention back to your breath/mantra without making a big deal about it, i.e., without getting down on yourself. This process of naming is really an artform that takes practice. At first it's kind of clumsy. This book outlines the process in greater detail and you should read it.

    There are some other fundamentals, too. Posture is important. You want to find a posture that supports you for 20-30 minutes with minimal pain, but also maximum attention. You can sit on a chair, or a low cushion, legs folded across or under you. The specifics don't matter. The goal is more important. Also, you want to either close your eyes or keep them focused on the floor with the kind of gaze you would have if you were looking at someone you were really fond of.

    The payoff...I can tell you from my personal experience that meditation is helping me choose when I react and when I don't. In situations where I would be prone to attack or defend, I'm now more likely to wait and assess the situation. Right after meditation, I can be very calm for hours. It's important, however, very important, that you don't sit with any lofty expectations. One lesson I've started to learn is that I'm okay where I am with my progress. My breath may not be very clear, and my attention still wanders like a motherfucker, but it's okay, and I can still focus on my breath and do my best. This goes back to what I was saying about not penalizing yourself for your lack of progress or skill. As soon as you do that, you'll notice some interesting changes that I'll leave up to you to figure out.

    The greater benefits, which I have yet to experience, is an understanding of what you are, what exactly is the "I" or "me" that we refer to in casual speech, how to best help other people, and freedom from suffering (which is not the same as "pain").

  3. #23
    mrs disregard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    7,855

    Default

    ^ This is such, such, great advice.

    Things that I was going to say in a post in this thread, but Edahn covered:

    -point is not to have a blank mind
    -point is to focus on an object (I like to sit before the mirror and focus on my eyes, so that after a while, everything begins to blur and it looks cool)
    -point is to calm the mind down

    But I will add my own:
    -The point of meditation is to let the heart and the mind speak. During the day, you are trying to get tasks done, you are trying to make affirmations, you are trying to change things. When you meditate... (try to make it a nice and softly-lit place.. like a dimly-lit room) let your heart and mind work together rather than fighting to create these false changes. Come to the truth with this opportunity of assembly.

  4. #24
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,524

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Journey View Post
    One last reply. I know whereof I speak. I was doing Transendental Meditation most probably before you were born, Victor. It is not something to be fooled around with (or you are a fool).
    It's true, sometime I am a fool.

    But not so much a fool that I believed Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of Transcendental Meditation, when he told us he could literally fly.

    But literal interpretations of metaphor are simply mistaken - whether they are literal interpretations of TM or the Bible.

    Literal interpretations are naturally made by children - and when I was a child, I spoke as a child - and as a man [or woman], I speak as a man [or woman].

    Literal interpretations of metaphor lead you into absurdity.

  5. #25
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,524

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BerberElla View Post
    I have tried to meditate before but I can't do it, I can't blank out my mind. It's always racing and thinking, so many different ideas running through my head that even falling asleep is a toughy.

    I have even tried to drug my way to successful meditation but even in that state my mind is still racing.
    The thoughts are part of meditation.

    You move between your thoughts.

    At first you move between fast thoughts then slow thoughts and back again.

    Then you move between slow thoughts and your imagination - this is more enjoyable.

    And so your imagination rolls on and on quite naturally because it is so enjoyable.

    And then there comes a surprising moment when your imagination stops. And there you are with no thoughts and no self talk.

    Everything remains exactly the same - but no thoughts.

    And then you start moving between no thoughts and your imagination; and then between your imagination and your self talk.

    But the important point is the movement.

    It is not your thoughts fast or slow, or your imagination, or no thought, but the movement between them.

    You even move between your thoughts - so you are already meditating - your mind is moving.

    And as your mind moves, so do you.

  6. #26
    Senior Member GinKuusouka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    2w3 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INFp
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Allow the thoughts to be there. Acknowledge when something enters your mind and then just allow it to go of its own accord. Don't do anything with it. And perhaps you would like something rhythmic or repetitive nearby while you meditate. Sometimes it helps ease the mind into the state. Soft music, chanting. Mine is running water. Just remember that it's different for everybody and that we each have our way of doing this. Find what works best for you.
    I have no idea who I am. All I can say is let's rock hard.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6?
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Journey View Post
    I would caution you to beware of any system of meditation that requires you to completely empty your mind. Meditation by definition is pondering. It is actively using your mind to focus on a subject. It doesn't require that you ever empty your mind.
    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Christians have been meditating for two thousand years. And I would be very surprised if they defined meditation as pondering.

    My guess is that Journey is prejudiced against meditation because she pushes a very narrow interpretation of Christianity.
    There's a Christian practice called "centering prayer" which is basically meditation. In this practice, instead of forcing "emptiness," the meditator relaxes and sits in quietness. He chooses a sacred word or phrase which he comes back to when he becomes aware of thoughts/distractions/etc. It's less about emptying and more about accepting and dismissing thoughts as they come as you focus on god/the universe/quiet/whatever.

    I believe that meditation would probably improve my quality of life, but I have trouble imagining when I would "fit it in."
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  8. #28
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Journey View Post
    One last reply. I know whereof I speak. I was doing Transendental Meditation most probably before you were born, Victor. It is not something to be fooled around with (or you are a fool).
    what are these supposed "risks"?
    Risks to taking a moment to quiet your mind and "let go" to where ever the subconscious wishes to go? (im not attempting to match some perfect definition)

    Its as if you speak of these places like they were "real". As if the boogeyman realm might actually *GASP* be able to climb inside your dualistic mind and occupy your head long with your separate mind!

Similar Threads

  1. [ENTP] ENTP and meditation
    By professor goodstain in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 05-25-2009, 06:04 AM
  2. Meditative Dance
    By Mole in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-20-2009, 07:58 PM
  3. Meditation
    By Snow Turtle in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-01-2009, 02:36 AM
  4. Meditation
    By SuperServal in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-12-2009, 01:20 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO