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  1. #11
    Ghost Monkey Soul Vizconde's Avatar
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    Im a dude but:

    Your result for The Six Wives of Henry VIII Test ...

    Katharine of Aragon
    Dutiful, Loyal, Loving, Dignified, Devout, Headstrong.
    I redact everything I have written or will write on this forum prior to, subsequent with and or after the fact of its writing. For entertainment purposes only and not to be taken seriously nor literally.

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    Spamtar - a strange combination of boorish drunkeness and erudite discussions, or what I call "an Irish academic"

  2. #12
    Member inebriato's Avatar
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    Anne Boleyn

    Witty, Sophisticated, Passionate, Emotional, Stylish, Intelligent, Outspoken.
    6w7.

  3. #13
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    I am Anne Boleyn, soon to be a spectre roaming hampton court palace with my head in the crook of my arms.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  4. #14
    The Duchess of Oddity Queen Kat's Avatar
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    Katharine of Aragon
    Dutiful, Loyal, Loving, Dignified, Devout, Headstrong.

    e

    "Humble and Loyal"



    Katharine the Queen was the first of Henry's wives, and one of the most beloved monarchs. A devout Catholic, Katherine was solemn, dignified, loyal, and stubborn, until the day she died. Previously married at 16 to Prince Arthur, Henry VIII's brother, Katharine steadfastly maintained her virginal status was true upon her marriage to Henry after Arthur's death. As Arthur was ill at the time he married Katharine, he likely was unable to consumate the union; Katharine well could have been a virgin on marrying Henry. Katharine was 23; Henry, 18.

    Although it is quite probable that Henry did love Katharine when they were married, the betrothal would come to a tragic end. The bible states that a man who takes his brothers wife will never bear children, and the union would be unclean- and although Henry maintained this to be his reason for wanting to be free of her (and Henry may well have believed his own rhetoric- he was trained to enter church service, not to be king), the more likely reason was his infatuation with Anne Boleyn.
    Katharine suffered many miscarriages, never giving him a son, only Princess Mary (who would grow to become Bloody Mary); Anne Boleyn promised him a son upon marriage. This cemented Henry VIII's resolve, and in 1533, he divorced Katherine, after a seven year battle with the Roman Catholic Church, leading to his excommunication and the Reformation.

    Katharine fought Henry tooth and nail, maintaining her virtue was intact when she wed Henry, despite his assertion that she had had relations with Prince Arthur and was therefore unable to have been elligible for marriage. She refused to conceed, no matter what reason Henry appealed to. Even as Henry sent Princess Mary away, ostensibly to be educated as a princess, but really as a form of punishment for Katharine, she would not relent. Henry forbade Katharine contact with their daughter, and in his zeal to be rid of Katharine, inadvertently abandoned Mary.

    In a last ditch attempt to be rid of her and free to marry Anne Boleyn, Henry demanded Katherine resign her throne and enter a nunnery. Katherine refused- she was the rightful queen and would not abdicate her crown.

    Frustrated, Henry banished Katharine from the castle, sending her to live in isolation, with one lady in waiting and a meager stipend. Sent to a castle so shabby that it leaked water and was crusted in mold, Katherine lived just three years more. She had not seen her daughter Mary in more than five years, and was reputed to have had her daughters name on her lips when she finally died of heartache, stress, and the shabby conditions to which she was exiled.
    She wrote a dying letter to Henry professing her love for him had not been changed, and forgiving him for his actions against her. It is unknown if Henry read the letter- he had been rejecting Katharine's mail for years- but her death had a profound effect, and was one of several events that marked the beginning of the end for his marriage to Anne Boleyn.
    I was sitting outside the classroom waiting to go in, and I saw an airplane hit the tower. The TV was obviously on. I used to fly myself and I said, "There's one terrible pilot."
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    SCUAI - 7w8 sx/sp - Chaotic Evil - Fucking Cute - ALIVE

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  5. #15
    Senior Member syndatha's Avatar
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    Catharine Howard

    "No other will but his"



    Catharine Howard was young, vivacious, flirty, and the third (or fourth) Boleyn woman to cross Henry. Her aunt, Elizabeth, was rumored to have slept with young King Henry. Elizabeth's daughters, Mary and Anne Boleyn, both had affairs with the king. Mary's ended in disgrace with a sad marriage and an illegitimate son, and Anne's ended in tragedy, after a controversial romance and marriage that produced the child who would become Elizabeth I, and culminated with her beheading.

    Catharine was from noble blood, but neglected early on. She lived with a grandmother that was far too permisive, and combined with her natural free spiritedness and her feelings of abandonment, Catharine was unable to control her desires, no matter what they cost her. She was immaure and unable to understand.

    Henry was thirty odd years her senior, overweight, and in failing health. He probably longed for the legendary days of his youth, and was in something of a midlife crisis when he married Catharine. She was uneducated- Catharine Howard could barely read or write- unsophisticated, and ill-suited for sovereignity. But she was attractive, charming, flirtatious, graceful, a young woman who could give him the second male heir he sought. Henry called her his "rose without thorns". He became smitten with her while still married to Anne of Cleves, a naive, sexually inexperienced woman with whom Henry had been unable to consumate.

    Catharine didn't love him, but she was fond of the gifts he showered her with, and enjoyed his attentions. Henry was as in lust with her as he had been with her cousin Anne Boleyn, if not more so, and her family, hungry for the kings graces and fearful of his wrath, were too afraid to point out her shortcomings. Henry married Catharine in 1540. She was not crowned, and the war with France had made a coronation ceremony too expensive, but she was declared queen all the same.

    The union lasted 17 months.

    Catharine was simply immature, undisciplined, and silly. She had no experience with the court, unlike Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour, who were courtiers, and therefore had no idea what was expected of her, or how very dangerous the position of queen was.

    Anne Boleyn's adultery was the product of Katharine of Aragon's faithful, and the abrupt ending of a tempestuous affair; Catharine Howard's adultery was very real- she continued her affairs throughout marriage. She thought, as long as she and Henry were both happy, then everything was fine. And Henry was happy as long as he didn't know, so as long as no one told him, the marriage would go well.

    She did treat Henry well, was affectionate, loving, and did her best to ease him as he was ill; but her true love was a young man named Culpepper, a courtier, who had charmed her before her marriage to Henry. Culpepper used Catharine for his own ambitions- she may have influenced the king to excuse him on charges of a very public rape and murder. Culpepper raped the wife of a peasant and ordered other courtiers to hold her down while he did so. He then murdered a passerby who tried to stop the attack.

    Once the secret was out, Henry could no longer turn a blind eye. Catharine was arrested and questioned. So silly and naive she was, that she confessed freely to all her affairs! And the more Henry investigated, the more he found.

    Henry was devastated, and offered to spare her life by sending her to a nunnery. But Catharine may not even have been aware of this option, or understood what it meant- once again her lack of intelligence doomed her. In light of her confession, her refusal to accept the offer left Henry no choice but to behead her- a queen's adultery was, by law, high treason. It is possible that Henry withdrew the offer before she could take it after learning how much he had been fooled. Certainly he was so enraged that every member of her family was locked in the tower, except for her uncle, who was let free under banishment.

    Catharine was executed on the tower green February 13, 1542. She was 19 years old.

    After her beheading, a law was passed, that not only should any one who had knowledge of suspect virginity of a future or seated queen be required to report anything they knew, but to not do so was a capital offense. In other words, if you thought a queen was impure, you had better speak up either prior to or after the wedding, before the king found out, or you would be beheaded along side her.

    Henry had finally tired of marrying for lust.
    I guess it wasn't a good idea to be honest in those days
    I would have accepted the nunnery, though

  6. #16
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    Anne Boleyn

    Anne Boleyn was executed May 19, 1536

  7. #17
    Senior Member tastes_like_purple's Avatar
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    Anne Boleyn
    Witty, Sophisticated, Passionate, Emotional, Stylish, Intelligent, Outspoken.

    "The Most Happy"

    A falling star fell from your heart and landed in my eyes,
    I screamed aloud, as it tore through them,
    and now it's left me blind...

  8. #18
    libtard SJW chickpea's Avatar
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    Catharine Howard

    Kind, flirtatious, impetuous, promiscuous and foolish

    "No other will but his"



    Catharine Howard was young, vivacious, flirty, and the third (or fourth) Boleyn woman to cross Henry. Her aunt, Elizabeth, was rumored to have slept with young King Henry. Elizabeth's daughters, Mary and Anne Boleyn, both had affairs with the king. Mary's ended in disgrace with a sad marriage and an illegitimate son, and Anne's ended in tragedy, after a controversial romance and marriage that produced the child who would become Elizabeth I, and culminated with her beheading.

    Catharine was from noble blood, but neglected early on. She lived with a grandmother that was far too permisive, and combined with her natural free spiritedness and her feelings of abandonment, Catharine was unable to control her desires, no matter what they cost her. She was immaure and unable to understand.

    Henry was thirty odd years her senior, overweight, and in failing health. He probably longed for the legendary days of his youth, and was in something of a midlife crisis when he married Catharine. She was uneducated- Catharine Howard could barely read or write- unsophisticated, and ill-suited for sovereignity. But she was attractive, charming, flirtatious, graceful, a young woman who could give him the second male heir he sought. Henry called her his "rose without thorns". He became smitten with her while still married to Anne of Cleves, a naive, sexually inexperienced woman with whom Henry had been unable to consumate.

    Catharine didn't love him, but she was fond of the gifts he showered her with, and enjoyed his attentions. Henry was as in lust with her as he had been with her cousin Anne Boleyn, if not more so, and her family, hungry for the kings graces and fearful of his wrath, were too afraid to point out her shortcomings. Henry married Catharine in 1540. She was not crowned, and the war with France had made a coronation ceremony too expensive, but she was declared queen all the same.

    The union lasted 17 months.

    Catharine was simply immature, undisciplined, and silly. She had no experience with the court, unlike Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour, who were courtiers, and therefore had no idea what was expected of her, or how very dangerous the position of queen was.

    Anne Boleyn's adultery was the product of Katharine of Aragon's faithful, and the abrupt ending of a tempestuous affair; Catharine Howard's adultery was very real- she continued her affairs throughout marriage. She thought, as long as she and Henry were both happy, then everything was fine. And Henry was happy as long as he didn't know, so as long as no one told him, the marriage would go well.

    She did treat Henry well, was affectionate, loving, and did her best to ease him as he was ill; but her true love was a young man named Culpepper, a courtier, who had charmed her before her marriage to Henry. Culpepper used Catharine for his own ambitions- she may have influenced the king to excuse him on charges of a very public rape and murder. Culpepper raped the wife of a peasant and ordered other courtiers to hold her down while he did so. He then murdered a passerby who tried to stop the attack.

    Once the secret was out, Henry could no longer turn a blind eye. Catharine was arrested and questioned. So silly and naive she was, that she confessed freely to all her affairs! And the more Henry investigated, the more he found.

    Henry was devastated, and offered to spare her life by sending her to a nunnery. But Catharine may not even have been aware of this option, or understood what it meant- once again her lack of intelligence doomed her. In light of her confession, her refusal to accept the offer left Henry no choice but to behead her- a queen's adultery was, by law, high treason. It is possible that Henry withdrew the offer before she could take it after learning how much he had been fooled. Certainly he was so enraged that every member of her family was locked in the tower, except for her uncle, who was let free under banishment.

    Catharine was executed on the tower green February 13, 1542. She was 19 years old.

    After her beheading, a law was passed, that not only should any one who had knowledge of suspect virginity of a future or seated queen be required to report anything they knew, but to not do so was a capital offense. In other words, if you thought a queen was impure, you had better speak up either prior to or after the wedding, before the king found out, or you would be beheaded along side her.

    Henry had finally tired of marrying for lust.

  9. #19
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Katharine Parr
    Intelligent, Kind, Headstrong, Outspoken, Nurturing

    "To Be Useful In All That I Do"

    Katharine Parr was Henry's sixth, final, and surviving wife. She was highly intelligent, somewhat educated, stylish on a scale that exceeded any of Henry's previous wives, devout, and kind. She believed in the Reformation, making many enemies in the kings court- many of whom were still conservative catholics. It should be noted that although Henry broke with the Catholic church in order to wed Anne Boleyn, and brought the Reformation to England, Henry remained a devout Catholic throughout his life. The religion that he created, he actually wanted no part of, and was just as likely to kill a Protestant for the crime of heresy as he would a Catholic. Katharine was a devout Protestant on the verge of evangelical, a flaw that Henry indulged when he was feeling well, but that infuriated him when he was not.

    So outspoken was Katharine Parr that her conservative opponents hatched a plan to have her arrested- but the person to serve the warrant dropped it in sight of one of Katharine's loyal courtiers. They raced ahead to warn her, and Katharine avoided arrest by feigning illness. During one of Katharine's lectures, Henry was ill, and infuriated, and it is quite likely that it was Henry himself who ordered a false arrest warrant in order to frighten Katharine into minding her opinions, or quite possibly very much intended to have her arrested.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  10. #20
    Member PeaceAndMusic's Avatar
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    Jane Seymour
    Shy, Timid, Pure, Chaste, Familial, Warm, Obedient.
    "Bound to Obey and Serve"

    Jane Seymour was born into a noble line, and served Katharine of Aragon as well as Anne Boleyn. Henry likely chose Jane because she was Anne's polar opposite- chaste, timid, submissive, shy. Jane was also manipulated into marrying the king by her ambitious father and brothers, but unlike Thomas Boleyn, John Seymour was not seeking to destroy anyone in the kings court (the Boleyns were angling to be rid of Cardinal Wolsey), they wanted only to advance in it. Using a daughter to get into a king's graces was fair play in the 1500s, and Jane was no exception.
    Henry was still smarting over the controversy surrounding his very public romancing of Anne Boleyn, and courted Jane in a much different way. This was just as well- Jane was a quiet woman who did not want the attention, a pious girl who would not even dine alone with the king. He romanced her much as he did Anne, with poems, letters, and expensive jewels- she kept the letters, but returned every present he sent her. Jane was unassuming, guileless, and by all accounts, kind-hearted and good. When asked by Henry what she would most want to do as queen, Jane responded that she wanted to reconcile Henry with Katharine's daughter, the princess Mary.
    As Anne was imprisoned, Henry and Jane planned a wedding. To Henry, this was essential to do quickly- Anne was never really accepted as queen by anyone outside of England, and was not even recognized until after Katharine of Aragon's tragic death. Even then, she was still considered to be no more than the king's concubine, the royal whore, and their daughter was an undesired betrothal. His relationship with his and Katharine's daughter Mary had been irreparably damaged by his isolation and deposing of Mary after the birth of Anne's daughter, Elizabeth, and Henry had not restored her as sovereign heir, despite his bastardization of Elizabeth. Effectively, Henry VIII had no heir to his throne, and no legitimate wife. By ridding himself of Anne and taking Jane Seymore as quickly as possible, he could produce a legitimate heir that could not be questioned.
    The day after Anne Boleyn's beheading, Henry announced his betrothal to Jane. Ten days after, they were married. Jane did not have the lush coronation ceremony that Anne Boleyn had- in fact, Jane was never even crowned. Henry may have wanted to be sure she could give him an heir before he crowned her. In 1537, Jane did give him the heir he so desired- a healthy boy named Edward. True to her word, she had Mary stand godmother to the boy, and Elizabeth was present at his christening. Her son would overtake either of the girls' claim to the throne, but Jane was more interested in the welfare of the entire Tudor family than with succession to the throne.
    Unfortunately, childbirth was a dangerous affair, and twelve days later, Jane Seymour died of complications.
    She was one of Henry's most beloved, and he wore black until the end of 1538, in mourning. He would not marry again for two years- the longest time Henry VIII went without a wife. Her honorable position as mother of the male heir was never forgotten, and she was painted with Henry in pictures throughout the castle long after her death.

    Your Analysis (Vertical line = Average)

    You scored 41% on KatharineOfAragon, higher than 35% of your peers.

    You scored 33% on AnneBoleyn, higher than 5% of your peers.

    You scored 64% on JaneSeymour, higher than 98% of your peers.

    You scored 42% on AnneOfCleves, higher than 77% of your peers.

    You scored 37% on CatharineHoward, higher than 62% of your peers.

    You scored 57% on KatharineParr, higher than 83% of your peers.

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