User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 27

  1. #1
    literally your mother PocketFullOf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    MBTI
    NeTi
    Enneagram
    pot
    Posts
    494

    Default At what age do one's cognitive functions become too developed to be typed?

    Or rather, what is the age range where one can be accurately typed generally speaking?

    Additionally, are some types more inclined to have more equally developed functions earlier on or in general that would make it more difficult to type them?

    What could contribute to someone being developed with regard to cognitive functions at a young age? I suspect this might not alway be a positive thing btw.


    **note** I know I am new and I am asking a lot of questions. I'm sorry if I am annoying you all, but I am rather curious about this stuff, so the good news is it will likely stick in my brain and I likely won't have to ask again.


    Taking a concept to it's logical end is rarely logical or relevant to the subject at hand.
    Johari Nohari
    7w6-3w2-1w9 / sCUA|I| / SER SEI
    Neutral Good
    bagfullofclocks | type me if you can


  2. #2
    I could do things Hard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 sp/so
    Socionics
    EIE Fe
    Posts
    7,988

    Default

    Mid 20's. The age when a persons brain more or less finishes development.
    MBTI: ExxJ tetramer
    Functions: Fe > Te > Ni > Se > Si > Ti > Fi > Ne
    Enneagram: 1w2 - 3w4 - 6w5 (The Taskmaster) | sp/so
    Socionics: β-E dimer | -
    Big 5: slOaI
    Temperament: Choleric/Melancholic
    Alignment: Lawful Neutral
    External Perception: Nohari and Johari

    Likes PocketFullOf liked this post

  3. #3
    Member unsomething's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    2w3
    Posts
    50

    Default

    I'm confused what made you think there is an age when people can no longer be typed. People can always be typed because they will always have an order of preference and comfort with the different functions...

    I hope I'm misunderstanding and you meant at what age are someone's functions developed enough to be accurately typed. In that case I agree with Hard for a universal cutoff but in reality mid teens would probably be fine.
    Likes PocketFullOf liked this post

  4. #4
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    729 sx/sp
    Socionics
    IEE Ne
    Posts
    5,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PocketFullOf View Post
    **note** I know I am new and I am asking a lot of questions. I'm sorry if I am annoying you all, but I am rather curious about this stuff, so the good news is it will likely stick in my brain and I likely won't have to ask again.
    i love the curiosity! it stimulates discussion among people who may have lost that spark a little. don't apologize for it!
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  5. #5
    literally your mother PocketFullOf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    MBTI
    NeTi
    Enneagram
    pot
    Posts
    494

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by unsomething View Post
    I'm confused what made you think there is an age when people can no longer be typed. People can always be typed because they will always have an order of preference and comfort with the different functions...

    I hope I'm misunderstanding and you meant at what age are someone's functions developed enough to be accurately typed. In that case I agree with Hard for a universal cutoff but in reality mid teens would probably be fine.
    I meant both. I know someone can always be typed but at a certain point through life experience most people develop their other functions that they don't use as well, this sometimes makes it harder to pinpoint their true type. Also I really think there are some people that use more functions more completely naturally, or at least come off as they do...and I don't think it's type related, but I do think some types are harder to recognize than others. I've heard before that ENFP is one of the types that is hardest to recognize for example. I think I agree with Jungian theory but I also think its just a theory rather than a strict rule that fits every person perfectly.


    Taking a concept to it's logical end is rarely logical or relevant to the subject at hand.
    Johari Nohari
    7w6-3w2-1w9 / sCUA|I| / SER SEI
    Neutral Good
    bagfullofclocks | type me if you can


  6. #6
    Member unsomething's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    2w3
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PocketFullOf View Post
    I meant both. I know someone can always be typed but at a certain point through life experience most people develop their other functions that they don't use as well, this sometimes makes it harder to pinpoint their true type. Also I really think there are some people that use more functions more completely naturally, or at least come off as they do...and I don't think it's type related, but I do think some types are harder to recognize than others. I've heard before that ENFP is one of the types that is hardest to recognize for example. I think I agree with Jungian theory but I also think its just a theory rather than a strict rule that fits every person perfectly.
    Well, as a rule, N-doms are mask wearers and game players. If you have a good working concept of everything you can seem like anything. That doesn't make them hard to type though, unless you only see them under one set of circumstances. They are hard to type only when they control the information they give. Not with reliable access to how they actually process information.

    The thing, at least with MBTI, is that the structure and preference of functions seems arbitrary if you don't understand how they are supposed to be working together. Functions are not 8 isolated chunks of brain mass that shrink and grow independently.

    For example, Ni collects information through Se. Fi collects information through Te. I actually imagine that these relationships are physical variations, meaning N/S and T/F respectively are probably cut from the same cloths. All parts of someone's personality need an external and internal component for them to function as a human being. Ni does not collect information through Si, for example, because you can't create information about the world from some isolated process that doesn't interact with it.

    So the illusion of the isolated cognitive functions is a misunderstanding.

    Yes, there's flexibility here... You could use a lot of Ni and very little Se, for example, or they could be more balanced. But the theory holds that you develop one function first, which essentially means that its counterpart will remain comparatively underdeveloped. That pattern seems true to the reality.

    There's actually very little going on here. If Ni/Se is a thing, and Fi/Te, Ti/Fe and Si/Ne, then there are really only four building blocks to one's type, they just come in different ratios from person to person.

    To simplify almost too far, if N/S and T/F are kindred, probably all MBTI is actually explaining is the proportion and localization of white vs grey matter.

    And think about it, what would be the point of having equal function preference? People have limited brain matter, it doesn't vary THAT much. If you divide a person's specialty up four ways, you're creating four disjointed retardations. You have to specialize to be excellent, if we consider average human capability as excellent, and it is. So you get one dominant function with an underdeveloped counterpart, to get you in the door and functioning, and later you get a, I don't know, "backup dominant" or auxiliary function with its own counterpart to round out your personality so you can function as an adult who needs to at least get by in things they are not specialized to do.

    That's my perspective, hope it's bot too vague and helps a little. Anyone should feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about any of this. It's just what I've strung together.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFp Ni
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Well, I know my grandfather is an ISTJ, BUT I relate to him a ton. He's quite old, and wrote some books.

    He's extremely successful financially. I don't know exacts, but he sounded like the stereotypical definition of Scrooge coming from my mother. Now he isn't. My ISTJ brother thinks of him as god. I think it is funny.

    This is my empirical data that this does happen. At what age? Well, I don't know. :P

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    bad
    Socionics
    ENTp
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PocketFullOf View Post
    Or rather, what is the age range where one can be accurately typed generally speaking?

    Additionally, are some types more inclined to have more equally developed functions earlier on or in general that would make it more difficult to type them?

    What could contribute to someone being developed with regard to cognitive functions at a young age? I suspect this might not alway be a positive thing btw.


    **note** I know I am new and I am asking a lot of questions. I'm sorry if I am annoying you all, but I am rather curious about this stuff, so the good news is it will likely stick in my brain and I likely won't have to ask again.
    You are carrying around a few misconceptions:
    1) You think even development is possible and even ideal. But in typology even-development is impossible. Its a model based on opposites. To be able to have one function you have to block out its opposite by definition.
    2) You cannot develop other/extra functions as well, if you could, it would only be possible in exchange for sacrificing your previous function.
    3) The older you get, the EASIER it is to type you. Its hard to type babies since they don't carry a load of rationalities and you can't talk to them. The older you get the more your actions and way of talking will reveal your type, you will come more and more invested in your type. Even the wrinkles in your face, the way you have pulled your facial muscles all those years will reveal it. It might be hard to accept it. But you are not god, not all you want to be, you are not "the all", you are just one type out of "the all". It actually helps you attain success if you can understand it. It will help you focus on your strengths and find people around you (other types) who join your cause and cover your weaknesses

  9. #9
    Senior Member reckful's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    567

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Researcher View Post
    You are carrying around a few misconceptions:
    1) You think even development is possible and even ideal. But in typology even-development is impossible. Its a model based on opposites. To be able to have one function you have to block out its opposite by definition.
    Jung said he thought more people were essentially in the middle on E/I than were significantly extraverted or introverted. What's your authority for the idea that it would be "impossible" for someone to be essentially in the middle on any of the Jungian/MBTI dimensions?

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    bad
    Socionics
    ENTp
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reckful View Post
    Jung said he thought more people were essentially in the middle on E/I than were significantly extraverted or introverted. What's your authority for the idea that it would be "impossible" for someone to be essentially in the middle on any of the Jungian/MBTI dimensions?
    I think you misinterpreted me. Let me clear the air.

    I did not say you cannot be in the middle of E/I as a general type. Of course you can be in the middle of Ne-Ti, or Si-Te or whatever first 2 functions of MBTI. The functions don't exist as machines, they are just pre-setup locations on the spectrum.

    the only thing you can't be in the middle of, is in the middle of opposites, unless you cancel them out. If you are in the middle of Te-Fi for example, then you void this dimension (implying you must be Ti or Fe, if you are not a dead stone).

Similar Threads

  1. At what point do you stop trying to grow and just accept your type?
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-29-2011, 12:28 AM
  2. What is your dominant Jungian cognitive function?
    By highlander in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 03-17-2011, 02:06 AM
  3. At what age did you learn how to play chess ?
    By Virtual ghost in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-11-2009, 01:46 PM
  4. [MBTItm] At what age you developed your current MBTI personaility
    By yenom in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: 06-17-2009, 09:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO