User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 27

  1. #11
    Senior Member reckful's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    567

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Researcher View Post
    I think you misinterpreted me. Let me clear the air.

    I did not say you cannot be in the middle of E/I as a general type. Of course you can be in the middle of Ne-Ti, or Si-Te or whatever first 2 functions of MBTI. The functions don't exist as machines, they are just pre-setup locations on the spectrum.

    the only thing you can't be in the middle of, is in the middle of opposites, unless you cancel them out. If you are in the middle of Te-Fi for example, then you void this dimension (implying you must be Ti or Fe, if you are not a dead stone).
    Jung's observation that more people are in the middle on E/I than are significantly extraverted or introverted can't be explained in terms of opposite-attitude dom and aux functions of equal strength. For one thing, Jung said the auxiliary function couldn't be as strong as the dominant. More importantly, and as discussed in this two-part post, Jung's function stack called for the auxiliary to have the same attitude as the dominant.

    And finally, as further discussed in this post, Jung attributed the ambiversion of the "middle group" to the fact that they were "less differentiated" than his types.

    Jung viewed extraversion/introversion as the most fundamental division underlying his types, and spent more of Psychological Types talking about the personality characteristics he thought extraverts tended to have in common and introverts tended to have in common than he spent talking about all eight of the functions put together. And Chapter X — the only part of Psychological Types where he gets into the functions in any detail — is organized accordingly. The first half of the chapter is devoted to "The Extraverted Type" and the second half to "The Introverted Type" — and the eight "function-types" consist of four varieties of the "extraverted type" and four varieties of the "introverted type."

    By contrast, the ambiverted "middle group" that Jung said was the most numerous of the three groups (and represented the "normal man") was made up of people who Jung said were neither extraverts nor introverts.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    INTP Ni
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Researcher View Post
    You are carrying around a few misconceptions:
    1) You think even development is possible and even ideal. But in typology even-development is impossible. Its a model based on opposites. To be able to have one function you have to block out its opposite by definition.
    2) You cannot develop other/extra functions as well, if you could, it would only be possible in exchange for sacrificing your previous function.
    3) The older you get, the EASIER it is to type you. Its hard to type babies since they don't carry a load of rationalities and you can't talk to them. The older you get the more your actions and way of talking will reveal your type, you will come more and more invested in your type. Even the wrinkles in your face, the way you have pulled your facial muscles all those years will reveal it. It might be hard to accept it. But you are not god, not all you want to be, you are not "the all", you are just one type out of "the all". It actually helps you attain success if you can understand it. It will help you focus on your strengths and find people around you (other types) who join your cause and cover your weaknesses

    So why do I type myself as ENTP in my teen/early 20s and come up as ENFP in my late 20s, and now have confliction between them? I started personal growth on ALL sides before I even knew any thing about MBTI/Jung.

    I'm suprised to hear this from an ENTP to be honest. Maybe it's because i'm a Left handed ENTP, so I have high creative ability/interests as well.

    So you're saying it's impossible to focus on one, develop it to a strength, then focus on the opposite, whilst NOT losing the strength of the other? Well you might lose some skills but the foundation and structural work will still be there. You'll just have more problems TESTING for it, because you won't know which to answer!

    You don't block the opposite at all, and if you do, it can be a temporary thing. All of my function bar 3 are 70%+, and i'm in my late 20s.
    I now realise ENTP, which Psychiatrist screwed me up, my T, allowing relationship with INFJ, F to develop in me in place of my weaken, damaged, violated T.

    Holland Code (RIASEC): IAE
    Ne (95%) Fi (85%) Ni /Fe (75%) Ti (70%) Si (55%) Se (50%)
    -------

  3. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7 sx
    Posts
    26

    Default

    I'd say it depends on a person. E.g. my parents - I still haven't managed to quite type my mum, because all her functions seem to be very well-developed. But you could probably tell my dad's ISTJ as soon as you met him. So I don't think it's the question of age, but rather how much effort you put into your development.

  4. #14
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,810

    Default

    123.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.
    Likes thepink-cloakedninja liked this post

  5. #15
    Junior Member summerdaze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I can see this. Things like work or social environment, or even self-awareness and wanting to strengthen weak spots in your personality, would muddy early strengths/preferences.

    I'd even argue: how much extra value is there really in knowing your "native" type? Besides just satisfying curiosity. Is it just as useful to know what type you tend to Now and even what type you might aspire to be? If your cognitive functions shift in strength and maybe priority of use.

    We could even look at cog functions as tools, the more tools you have skill using, the better off you are. You might start out being better at using some but that's no reason to limit yourself to those.
    I had a really good thought about this 5 seconds ago but Ne

  6. #16
    Senior Member wolfnara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    649 sp/so
    Socionics
    EII Fi
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Functions don't ever become fully developed. I imagine its easier to type someone at a younger age, about 15-30.
    "Those who do not move, do not notice their chains"
    -Rosa Luxemburg

  7. #17
    noʎ ɟo ǝʇnɔ ʍoH Mademoiselle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    MBTI
    -NTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    928

    Default

    Again, it's not based on age, but maturity.
    When a person realises they don't have to unnecessarily express themselves, thus typing them would be hard.
    But once again when a person reaches that state, he'd be wise enough to know about him/herself.
    Sometimes tyoilogy tests become inaccurate, because a person is effected by what he'd learnt from the others, and it's called improvement


    In my earlier posts I had pointed out that the 'perfect' type is one with balanced cognetive functions as there's no domination in the pairs, both work effectivly ..

    I'm personally very close frim balancing my FeelingXThinking functions as people start suggesting me I'm a feeler, I'm not though, the point is they're even convinced that I'm one.

    So as a person matures the dominationg effect lightnes and the person starts to consider many things he never cared thought or cared for before, humans learn to thibk in new ways and learn new things, which makes their actions less efected by their personalities and rather to do what's right and choose what's right.

    But of course they remain the same personality (their brains operate the same way, they act in a better way)

    One important point is that the enviroment makes it easier for certai. Types to improve and get mature faster before other types, that's why I was surprised to meet an impressively mature INFP at collage, it's something you wont see everyday.
    Generally sensors can grow up easier as they just watch and learn while intutives are confused at the ridiculous part of life.
    Oh and poor INTJs are never to be understood.
    Imagine this is the best thing you've ever read.
    Likes RobinSkye liked this post

  8. #18
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    It goes farther than maturity.

    It depends on so many factors.

    Egocentrism vs sociocentrism
    Adaptability
    Personal drives
    Individual convictions and subjective values thereof
    Flexibility


    In short, how well can you integrate the extremes of your personality into your daily life. If not at all, you'll probably end up an untypable bore by the end of your life.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf
    Likes windoverlake liked this post

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Regardless of age I've never met anyone who did not fall into a Temperament type (NF, NT, SJ, SP). But yes, the older someone is the longer it takes to suss out all four letters. But I think it is a natural thing to become a little trickier to type at first sight the older someone is; ideally, we smooth out and 'become less' of one type as we 'become more' adaptable and abiding.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PerfectlyConfused View Post
    So why do I type myself as ENTP in my teen/early 20s and come up as ENFP in my late 20s, and now have confliction between them? I started personal growth on ALL sides before I even knew any thing about MBTI/Jung.

    I'm suprised to hear this from an ENTP to be honest. Maybe it's because i'm a Left handed ENTP, so I have high creative ability/interests as well.

    So you're saying it's impossible to focus on one, develop it to a strength, then focus on the opposite, whilst NOT losing the strength of the other? Well you might lose some skills but the foundation and structural work will still be there. You'll just have more problems TESTING for it, because you won't know which to answer!

    You don't block the opposite at all, and if you do, it can be a temporary thing. All of my function bar 3 are 70%+, and i'm in my late 20s.
    I think there are a lot of reasons why your assessment of your type may change, starting with the fact that most personality tests are really, really bad. Modern Western education has a bias toward the thinking function and if you are an intelligent, sensitive and aware person, you may tend to suppress or dislike the feeling function in favor of the thinking one -- plus some test questions are along the lines of "Are you tenderhearted or tough-minded?" -- "tenderhearted" I think nowadays has a rather negative connotation, like you have posters of kittens on your walls. As you get older you may become more sure of yourself, or you may take a better personality test, or you may read more thoroughly and better understand what the feeling function actually represents.Note that I wrote at the start that your assessment changes -- I think type is pretty well established by the late teens. But I also think that as you get into middle age your personality may change to the extent that your auxiliary, third and fourth functions develop -- at least for some people. Your type won't change, but functions other than your dominant one can become stronger -- so an ENTP may develop his introverted thinking and extroverted feeling and actually manage to remember to send his mom flowers on Mother's Day -- this won't turn him into an ISTJ, just a more mature ENTP typologically speaking. He will never notice if his mom gets a new hairstyle because extroverted sensing is so far down the list of his functions that it probably never will develop -- so no, you probably can't choose an arbitrary function to strengthen, that would just lead to frustration or making a fool of yourself.

Similar Threads

  1. At what point do you stop trying to grow and just accept your type?
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-29-2011, 12:28 AM
  2. What is your dominant Jungian cognitive function?
    By highlander in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 03-17-2011, 02:06 AM
  3. At what age did you learn how to play chess ?
    By Virtual ghost in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-11-2009, 01:46 PM
  4. [MBTItm] At what age you developed your current MBTI personaility
    By yenom in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: 06-17-2009, 09:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO