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  1. #51
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    The suspense is over! Class is back in session!!

    Techniques

    Here's today's musical background:

    Yeah, huh? Or this one. You know, whatever.

    "Artisans don't spend much time worrying about morality or morale, and they have only a passing interest in devising technology (the concerns, respectively, of the Guardians, Idealists, and Rationals.) But they are always interested, even preoccupied, with the acquisition of technique. In regard to this distinction between SP technique and NT technology, it is necessary to understand that, although the two resemble each other in a superficial manner, they are fundamentally different. Both are derived from the root "tech" which means they have to do with effective building, but they are entirely different ways of building. Technology is the theoretical study of method, technique the empirical perfecting of method. And this is where the Artisans shine. No matter what the cost in time, energy, hardship, peril, or expense, they must perfect their repertoire of techniques."


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    Hey, if you're not cheating, you're not trying. And it's only cheating if you get caught.
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    Begin taking applications for "Jeffster of Love" reality show.
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    See, I hear people say that all the time, and I completely disagree. Movies are good for that exact reason. You don't have any pressure of trying to make awkward conversation. You spend time with someone and get a feel for their reactions to things. Make it a comedy, though. Too heavy stuff and you walk out all dazed. You can always go somewhere to talk after the movie. If it was good, you have something to start off talking about. If it sucked, you can talk about how terrible it is. You can compare to other movies you've seen, and the characters to people you each know in real life, and go from there. I have done this several times and it almost always went well. Bada bing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    I always say if there's a way to injure myself, I'll find it!
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    Yeah, it's much better to talk about our preferred weapons or the proper way to go about a riot at a basketball arena.
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    Yeah, I mean you could start counting from the moment I "accidentally" drop a coin in her cleavage when walking by, and say "Oh! I'm so sorry, lemme get that for you!"
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    I WON MY FREE TICKETS FROM THE RADIO STATION!!

    and it wasn't even by being a random caller like usual, I actually had to earn it by texting who is the Big 12 coach of the year and why in one sentence.

    My winning entry:

    "Mike Leach - because a crazy band of pirates from Lubbock is in contention for a national championship!"

    I've actually spent quite a bit of time worrying about morality, but then it seems ISFPs are more prone to that then the other Artisans. When it comes to techniques, though, reading this stuff was an eye-opener to me, just in the sense that I never really thought much about it before. Developing techniques in life has been something that just sort of happened from experience, not something I consciously focused on trying to do usually. Actually, it was the times that I DID focus on trying to do that when I usually failed miserably.

    Acting, voice skills, writing, athletics, improvising in all areas, adapting and reacting to situations - a lot of the stuff we've already talked about before - these are the areas where I have learned and perfected techniques, almost always through trial and error.

    One basic thing that comes to mind that I have improved on is my techniques with people on the phone at my office. I have been in the office since May 2005, and during that first year, I got caught by a scam that cost us money on toner for our copier/fax. What they would do is have one person call and say they were calling from "the copier company" and needed to check the model type on the copier. And also asked who was the one who ordered the printing supplies. Well, the first time it was somebody else who answered the phone and gave them that information, so when they called back, they asked for me. The story they gave was "the price of toner for your Toshiba 3200 (or whatever it was) is going up, but I can send you one more shipment at the old price." Not being aware of the fact that all of our toner is included in the monthly service contract that we have, I went ahead and agreed to the order of toner.

    At that time our company president was still paying the bills herself, and when that invoice came across her desk, she paid it, so of course this "data systems" company realized they had a fish hooked so they were going to try it again. Armed with my new knowledge the next time, I would not fall for it, though. Now when someone calls and asks for the copier information, I ask them "what company are you with?" Usually the response is "your copier company", so I say "what company is that?" At that point, they hang up because they know they are not getting the scam over on me. Obviously, operations like that stay in business because there are a lot of companies where they talk to some receptionist that is clueless about how the supplies are paid for (as I was the first time) so they can easily convince someone who doesn't ask them enough questions.

    I have saved myself a lot of time at work by learning better questions to ask telemarketers and other folks to quickly determine if the call is legitimate or not, and not have to go through a long time-wasting process before I can let it go. So the office phone area is one place I can see a real improvement in my technique.

    When it comes to the stuff like drama, radio, internet role-playing, sports, all that stuff I talked about in the arts section, so much of it is timing. Learning to respond quickly to what is presented in the given situation is a trial-and-error process where you have to have some sort of response or tactic first even it's a lousy one, and you figure out what does and what doesn't work, and do your best to repeat the stuff that does. Learning from each little missed opportunity, where you let the soccer ball get past you into the goal because you misread the movements of the striker, where next time you will see it just a little bit sooner, judge correctly and get a hand on the ball to knock it away before they can score. Where last time a joke fell flat because you ordered the words a little wrong or your timing was a bit too late, or you didn't have the right facial expression or vocal inflection, but you keep trying it and then you get it where you nail it every time. Heck, driving in traffic, where you keep missing your exit because you can't get over into the lane fast enough, maneuvering through the cars from left to right, but you learn the patterns and to read the cues to see the openings and then hell yeah not only did you make it there, you were smooth doing it too, so eat my dust!

    Parenting is of course another area where techniques is a huge part of it. My son can be the annoying scam artist or the soccer striker, or the bad traffic, or the tough audience, and every day and every encounter and situation is an opportunity to learn which buttons to push, which rewards and punishments and responses yield the best response, and which are best not to try again. I had to learn there are times when the most effective reprimand is silence, and times when the point needs to be made vocally and sometimes loudly. It's like a sports coach who has to know when to get in his player's faces to motivate, and when to back off a bit and let them find their own motivations based on their own desires for success. My son is a very intelligent 9-year-old, and most likely another Artisan, and I know full well from my own experience, that too much in-your-face and he is simply going to tune it out or be more determined to act to get a negative reaction. I have to be able to let him see the consequences of his own actions sometimes, and let him be the one that takes the proactive position to make a situation change by altering his tactic.

    Next up, we'll talk about the tools of the trade, i.e. equipment.
    Last edited by Jeffster; 03-23-2009 at 01:57 AM.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  2. #52
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Equipment

    Here's some music to listen to


    "Artisans are happiest when working with any and all sorts of equipment. Apparatus, implements, machines, and instruments captivate them; they are things to be used -- employed, deployed -- and the SPs cannot not operate them. They must drive the bulldozer, pilot the plane, steer the boat, fire the gun, toot the horn, wield the scalpel, brush or chisel. Something about equipment strikes a chord in the character of the SPs, extending the reach, augmenting, amplifying, and sharpening the effects of many of the techniques they increasingly acquire and perfect."


    When I was a little kid, one of my first cherished toys was a little rubber Fisher Price dump truck, mostly yellow with blue wheels and an orange bed that I would load up with whatever other little toys and materials that would fit inside, drive the truck to some other destination in my room and dump the contents out. It could keep me occupied for quite awhile, collecting various things to load and dump all around the room, it was probably the first time I got a taste of power or control, really having the ability to make something happen of my own design.



    No, that's not what it looked like, but I'm not going to look through more than 12 pages of google images to find something closer.

    I remember I also loved clocks. I had a fascination with the different kinds of clocks, and I had a plastic toy owl clock that I loved to play with, moving the numbers and hands around. I also had one of those calendars where it's cardboard with numbers and special holiday squares that you stuck in the spots to make the months. I would put those in and take them out, over and over for long periods of time, experimenting with all the different ways the calendar could be set up.

    As I got older I moved on to record players, tape decks and the first of my real lifelong loves, the radio. As much as I've always loved music, the radio and the tape players and record players weren't just sources of music to me, they were equipment to test and manipulate and tinker with and utilize in my own way, with my own methods, with whatever creative stamp I could put on them and amuse and entertain myself or others with. Of course, when I got a clock radio for Christmas one year, that was the greatest invention ever, as it combined two of my childhood loves into one awesomely adaptable and usable piece of fascinating equipment.



    I also played all kinds of sports as a kid, which of course brings its own slew of equipment, from bats to balls to gloves to sticks, racquets and hoops, and I got creative in this department too. Although I played team sports with other kids - soccer for 10 years, little league baseball, basketball, floor hockey, and a little flag football, I didn't limit myself to only playing in scheduled games with others, as my hunger for athletic action wouldn't always wait for sanctioned arenas and even the limits of my own observable ability. At home, both inside and outside, I played and created, with whatever equipment and whatever methods were at my disposal. Football season would be split between playing outside with an actual football in my yard, using two sets of two pine trees as my opposing goal posts when fieldgoals and extra points were tried, and inside where I sometimes used soft foam footballs but also would use a plastic orange halloween pumpkin with a hole in it meant for party favors, that served as pretty much whatever ball I needed in whatever sport I was playing.

    Most sports were pretty easy to play in my room by myself, as the pumpkin could be slapped back and forth between my spread out hands for tennis and pitched and hit (with me holding onto it) across my room for baseball, and passed across my room to myself in football (this one I tried when I could to save for when my dad wasn't home because he would get mad at me for continually hitting the floor whenever I tackled myself.) Basketball actually required a bit more homemade equipment, as I actually had to have a makeshift hoop, so I usually used a small trash can which I would line with soft enough stuff that it wouldn't make too loud a noise when it landed in the can on a long shot. Of course this was the game that was the hardest to control, as I could miss a lot and the hard plastic pumpkin could go flying, hitting various things around the room including, yes, windows. (I had the pumpkin taken away from me a few times but I always managed to get it back. )



    Legos and erector sets, toy weapons of all sorts, model rockets, bicycles, power tools for things like shaping a block of wood into a toy car, fishing rods, camping equipment, cooking equipment, all just more examples of the stuff I utilized growing up.

    Along with the radio and musical stuff, my other main lifelong love has been anything to do with cars, roads, and driving. Not the mechanical repair work stuff, but pretty much everything else having to do with them. The dump truck and baby-type cars gave way to Hot Wheels and Matchbox cars, and a rubber mat with roads and streets on it that I drove many a toy car through, imagining it as all sorts of different towns and counties and states. When we took real trips in the family car, I loved to trace our route on a map, and wonder about all the other roads that we didn't take, and where they went, and how I'd love to drive them. So when I finally got my own car, it was only so long before my desire to hit the open road and explore could no longer be contained. And my two greatest equipment-loves would come together as I could operate all the switches and levers and pedals and buttons to keep the car in motion, and I could also operate the radio and the tape deck to tune in the different radio stations or play the tunes to create the soundtrack of my travels.

    All through childhood, we had computers and various video game systems in the home too, and as an adult when I got my own home computer, and especially when I got internet access, that equipment carried with it all sorts of new avenues for amusement and creativity, but that's another story....
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  3. #53
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    While this is all entertaining its very SFP not STP and we're still SPs don't you forget :P

  4. #54
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukepd View Post
    While this is all entertaining its very SFP not STP and we're still SPs don't you forget :P
    Muhaaa! LukePD strikes again! LOL!

  5. #55
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukepd View Post
    While this is all entertaining its very SFP not STP and we're still SPs don't you forget :P
    Feel free to chime in with your STPness any time you want, dude.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  6. #56
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Jeffster, your view into the SFP world is actually quite entertaining to ESTP me.

    I am "F" retarded, I swear.

  7. #57
    Perfect Gentleman! =D d@v3's Avatar
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    Wow, Jeff, this is interesting to read.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    Feel free to chime in with your STPness any time you want, dude.
    I guess my point is you were trying to explain SPs as a whole

    Edit: Oh and can't be assed lol

  9. #59
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukepd View Post
    I guess my point is you were trying to explain SPs as a whole
    I wouldn't dream of it!

    I'm simply providing examples from my life of the different personality traits of SPs given in the book. I never claimed the examples would be all-encompassing. I can only write about what I know. That's why any other SP who wants to chime in with relevant stories to each topic is welcome to do so. If I tried to come up with every possible way each trait could be displayed, I'd take like 50 years to do it, and you and I both know I'd get tired of it long before then.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    I wouldn't dream of it!

    I'm simply providing examples from my life of the different personality traits of SPs given in the book. I never claimed the examples would be all-encompassing. I can only write about what I know. That's why any other SP who wants to chime in with relevant stories to each topic is welcome to do so. If I tried to come up with every possible way each trait could be displayed, I'd take like 50 years to do it, and you and I both know I'd get tired of it long before then.
    Just what I got from the title of the thread... I take things very literally.

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