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  1. #11
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    Thirdly, I kind of agree with your point about meeting needs (What's the point in changing a method of doing things when both the current method AND the potential method are flawed?), but I always thought of it as a kind of security blanket, or a fear of new things. I think SJs are really cautious people, and their fear of change has something to do with that instinct.
    Part of my practice is coaching teachers and I can get the SJs to change if i meet their needs (actually this is true for any of the types). Part of the problem is that ENs love to try anything new and are really vocal about it, which makes anyone who is hesitant, even if for very good reasons, look afraid...

    The STJs often look to me for exactly what I would do to make the change. The SFJs want me there while they try it. The STPs want me to hand over something that'll work tomorrow. If it works, they're fastest on board. The SFPs want to coteach with me for more than one try if i have time...
    edcoaching

  2. #12
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    Actually what students need to learn math varies phenomenally by the quadrants of the type table (IS, IN, ES, EN) with a kicker thrown in for the T-F dichotomy that without the proper environment, F's will more likely develop math anxiety. We're doing a double-blind research study right now filming students doing math tasks and the differences are striking enough to even get math teachers to change their practices
    This probably depends somewhat on what material is being taught. I used to (re)teach college students algebra I & II, and I was surprised how many did not know their multiplication tables. As a result the kids had no idea if their answers looked reasonable. I think this is my biggest pet peeve with elementary math education. Kids would have a much easier time in later math classes if they all had their addition, multiplication, etc... tables memorized.
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
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  3. #13
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    This probably depends somewhat on what material is being taught. I used to (re)teach college students algebra I & II, and I was surprised how many did not know their multiplication tables. As a result the kids had no idea if their answers looked reasonable. I think this is my biggest pet peeve with elementary math education. Kids would have a much easier time in later math classes if they all had their addition, multiplication, etc... tables memorized.
    The tasks we're filming are rich tasks designed to reveal student thinking and which can be done in multiple ways. Think about this: not one Sensing student has tried using numbers/equations to solve the tasks. Almost all the Intuitives did. They all had approximately the same standardized test scores and instruction...

    And elementary math...remember the majority of the teachers are Sensing and Feeling, most likely to have math anxiety although many love math. When the math-anxious teachers work with teh constructivist curricula, they are nervous because, well, the students are so unpredictable. The skill drill is embedded in the games and extra activities and a lot of this is skipped because they want to be through with math. So it's there in every curriculum. The problem is teacher training, to which the US for the most part devotes neither time nor money. Those who teach elementary math in China, for example, get 3 hours a day to prep, review student work, and confer with colleagues if a student isn't understanding. IN the US teachers have an hour at most to contact parents, correct papers, plan lessons, etc...
    edcoaching

  4. #14
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    I am excellent at arithmetic, but I have a problem with more abstract mathematics. Also, I get frustrated when I see too many numbers and letters smooshed together on a page. I found myself having to re-read things all the time in my Calculus and Statistics classes in college.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    Also, I get frustrated when I see too many numbers and letters smooshed together on a page. I found myself having to re-read things all the time in my Calculus and Statistics classes in college.
    Couldn't have said it better myself. I do abstract, but I hate looking at equations, man, hate it. My mind is perfectly suited to geometry, not algebra.

  6. #16
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    I am excellent at arithmetic, but I have a problem with more abstract mathematics. Also, I get frustrated when I see too many numbers and letters smooshed together on a page. I found myself having to re-read things all the time in my Calculus and Statistics classes in college.
    ...I'm filming 6th graders who are 1-2 years behind in math.

    If there's too many #s on a page then more Sensing is required. I loved it all through calculus, then I knew I'd never use the stuff and opted for more literature classes
    edcoaching

  7. #17
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcoaching View Post
    The tasks we're filming are rich tasks designed to reveal student thinking and which can be done in multiple ways. Think about this: not one Sensing student has tried using numbers/equations to solve the tasks. Almost all the Intuitives did. They all had approximately the same standardized test scores and instruction...
    I could see type mattering a lot more once you get to algebra. It could also stand to be overhauled more than arithmetic IMO. The way algebra is designed is basically to be a bridge into higher level math courses. Ironically most students who take algebra will probably never get beyond algebra II. If they take college algebra when they get to college it's basically more of the same. The only reason I could give for teaching it, is that it prepares people for statistics. (But you really don't need algebra II to prepare for stats.)
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
    http://www.revoltingvegetables.com

  8. #18
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    I could see type mattering a lot more once you get to algebra. It could also stand to be overhauled more than arithmetic IMO. The way algebra is designed is basically to be a bridge into higher level math courses. Ironically most students who take algebra will probably never get beyond algebra II. If they take college algebra when they get to college it's basically more of the same. The only reason I could give for teaching it, is that it prepares people for statistics. (But you really don't need algebra II to prepare for stats.)
    It actually matters phenomenally in arithmetic. The films get teachers/professors/curriculum coordinators to fall off their chairs as they see the very different ways the students make sense of the problems. And we've seen how students respond when tutored using the methods that appeal to their natural preferences. The light in their eyes as they finally have hope that they can learn is unbelievable. When you're three years behind in math and only 11 years old, finally grasping a concept after years of feeling stupid is pretty powerful.
    edcoaching

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