User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 22

  1. #1
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default the Journey into Thinking

    As a kid I was pretty emotional, but as I progressed from 14 onward, I seemed to get flatter and flatter emotionally until I ended up as my usually cold, unfeeling extremely T type self.

    Has anyone else ever reflected on this and wondered what it might be like to be an emotional F ball where you don't have to make the descent (or ascent if you prefer) into T land after childhood. I guess that is assuming all T types take this journey.

  2. #2
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    It sounds interesting.

    I don't ever remember making a descent/ascent into T-Land, though. I was always there to start with, in terms of what I allowed people to see of my inner workings.

    There was a point where I actively chose to stop crying. But otherwise? Always internalized.

    My INTP son was doing this when he was three: He'd start to smile at something, then you could literally watch him shove it back down to present a flat neutral face to the world. It was hilarious (and a little sad).
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #3
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    It sounds interesting.

    I don't ever remember making a descent/ascent into T-Land, though. I was always there to start with, in terms of what I allowed people to see of my inner workings.

    There was a point where I actively chose to stop crying. But otherwise? Always internalized.

    My INTP son was doing this when he was three: He'd start to smile at something, then you could literally watch him shove it back down to present a flat neutral face to the world. It was hilarious (and a little sad).
    I wonder if I'm an INFP forced into emotional flatness. Then I wonder if that explains all INTP type nines. I'm the youngest child, and at home I was surrounded by 3 NT guys and never had a good relationship with my ESFJ mom.

  4. #4
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ImNotTooPopular View Post
    I wonder if I'm an INFP forced into emotional flatness. Then I wonder if that explains all INTP type nines. I'm the youngest child, and at home I was surrounded by 3 NT guys and never had a good relationship with my ESFJ mom.
    It is worth exploring.

    Did you feel ashamed for expressing your feelings, commonly, when you were growing up?

    How did your brothers view your mother? (Respect her? Dislike her? Make fun of her behind her back?)

    Did you spend lots of time with your brothers, and did they have negative reactions to your feeling expressions?

    (Those are a few questions to start things off with something like this...)
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #5
    shoshaku jushaku rivercrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    I often describe myself as "having had the F beaten out of me" as a kid.

    Mom tells me I was always very logical as a kid. I think this is one of the reasons why dad and I get along.
    Who rises in the morning, looks in the mirror and says, "I think I will do something stupid today?" -- James Hollis
    If people never did silly things nothing intelligent would ever get done. -- Ludwig Wittgenstein
    Whaling is illegal in Oklahoma.

  6. #6
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    It is worth exploring.

    Did you feel ashamed for expressing your feelings, commonly, when you were growing up?

    How did your brothers view your mother? (Respect her? Dislike her? Make fun of her behind her back?)

    Did you spend lots of time with your brothers, and did they have negative reactions to your feeling expressions?

    (Those are a few questions to start things off with something like this...)

    Actually, I didn't express feelings because I felt it wasn't safe to do so.

    Mom was viewed as someone who could become crazy and irrational at any moment.

    I spent a lot of time with one of my brothers, mostly just playing video games and stuff like that. This same brother was often very critical and arrogant, though.

    These days, the INTP profiles fit me very well, but I don't think they would've applied until I was about 15 or 16.

  7. #7
    Junior Member Jezebel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    intj
    Posts
    27

    Default

    I was a very T child. I remember feeling humiliated if I showed emotion, often even if it was positive. I lived alone with my father between the ages of 3 and 12. I don't know if that had anything to do with it though as he is actually very F. He often gave me a hard time about being cold and unloving, and I viewed him as too moody and inconsistent. We had lots of fights with me questioning his reasoning and him not giving me satisfactory answers. We were often flustered with each other.

    I'm more comfortable with my feeling side now than I was when I was younger. It's been a conscious effort though, and hormones have probably affected me too.
    Last edited by Jezebel; 06-18-2007 at 03:09 PM. Reason: missing word

  8. #8
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jezebel View Post
    I was a very T child. I remember feeling humiliated if I showed emotion, often even if it was positive. I lived alone with my father between the ages of 3 and 12. I don't know if that had anything to do with it though as he is actually very F. He often gave me a time about being cold and unloving, and I viewed him as too moody and inconsistent. We had lots of fights with me questioning his reasoning and him not giving me satisfactory answers. We were often flustered with each other.

    I'm more comfortable with my feeling side now than I was when I was younger. It's been a conscious effort though, and hormones have probably affected me too.
    You just reminded me that I was uncomfortable with showing almost any emotion, even positive ones for fear of being criticized. I didn't really know that kids could be unemotoinal T types. I never really got to be around kids much any time in my life.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ImNotTooPopular View Post
    As a kid I was pretty emotional, but as I progressed from 14 onward, I seemed to get flatter and flatter emotionally until I ended up as my usually cold, unfeeling extremely T type self.
    You have probably heard this before or thought of it, but it seems to me that you were just emotional as a kid because all little kids are emotional. Try watching other kids' behavior, and I bet it will be more emotional than your's was.

  10. #10
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dufresne View Post
    You have probably heard this before or thought of it, but it seems to me that you were just emotional as a kid because all little kids are emotional. Try watching other kids' behavior, and I bet it will be more emotional than your's was.
    I do have this theory that all kids tend to spend most of their time acting like SFPs. Introversion and Extroversion seem to be very present during childhood, though. I don't really know that much about kids.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 41
    Last Post: 02-13-2014, 12:46 AM
  2. A Journey into the Mind of God
    By RaptorWizard in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-02-2013, 09:00 AM
  3. [SJ] Do you ever come into the guardhouse and think????
    By Saslou in forum The SJ Guardhouse (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ)
    Replies: 130
    Last Post: 05-23-2010, 07:30 AM
  4. Need Guidance for my Journey into the Land of Coffee
    By EJCC in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 05-12-2010, 03:15 PM
  5. Turning the workplace into an online rpg
    By Geoff in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-29-2007, 12:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO