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  1. #121
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    Here and Now for a few seconds but far and away for a few eons.
    A lot like a tardis.

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Now that you've lost interest, machine:run, explanation. I wrote a really long one. Way too complicated. Maybe I'll post that somewhere else.

    So basically, I'm not my body. I don't think I am, at least. I think I'm consciousness - part(s) of my brain. We're all attached though. Consciousness, brain, body; good friends.

    Anyway, there's things my body can do pretty well. Like keep blood pumping (brain stem). I can't do much to control that. I'm programmed to coordinate my hands with the eyes, too. I can control that. However, I there's a limitation to being conscious. If I focus on the wrong stuff, I screw up.

    So I want to catch a ball. If I focus on my desire to catch the ball, that won't help me catch the ball. Why? Because I'm consciousness. I can't catch balls - but my good friend the body can. So I pay attention to the body. This is a little unsettling because I'm putting my trust in something that isn't me. My body isn't me.(actually, no, it isn't that unsettling, but with a different example it might be).

    My body is good at catching balls though. Part learned, but natural. So I just let it. How? By focusing on the sensation without trying to make it do anything. That's good advice. Body = the machine = good at catching balls. Consciousness = I = never caught a ball.

    I don't know how MBTI fits into this, but maybe it does.

    I understand what you mean about your consciousness and your body being separate. The more time you spend focusing on your body's physical movement, the more you become aware that "you" are controlling this machine. And the fact that "you" can make it do some incredible things.

    It's the same as a driver and a car being separate. Some people are better drivers than others.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Don't you know, combine them.
    I've found swimming to be particularly enjoyable while under the influence. It's like I can feel the drag of the water through my skin much more intensely. It seems like I can achieve perfect balance easier and I move through the water more efficiently.

    It's not performance-enhancing like that though. Overall, I think the effects mostly come from being more relaxed and a heightened sensory perception.

  4. #124
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    An excellent summary song for how I feel 99.9% of the time -

    Real Cool World - David Bowie

    Cartoony, otherworldly, strange and stuck in a plotline that reads like a circus.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    Luckily I recorded this conversation so that we can re-enact it in the here and now:
    ROFL!!! Jeff, you fool!! *smacks your arm* hahahahaha!!! Like, OMGoshthatwashilariousone11!!11one!1... That convo was so awesomesauce that cattle gave birth 50 miles away!!

    Everyone *knows* that lemonade splashes can bring people back from death.

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    You Ns are bizarre.
    Youbetcha.

    But I never feel as alive as I do when my heart is beating 180 bpm, every muscle in my body is on fire, my lungs are searing, and I feel like I'm going to puke. Hooray for physical sensation bringing me back to reality.
    See?? This is what I'm talking about. HOW... HOW can a person be so present and marinating in the moment?! That's not fair!

    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post

    Anytime you mention something to me, I take a spoonful of stuff from the blender. There'll be some stuff about here and now, some more stuff about the past, but the greater bit comes from the future. I can't see just the present here and now without seeing other stuff as well. So "this is the greatest here and now" doesn't exists for me. Being able to get forgot about the other junk might be nice... wish I could try it out for a day or something.
    Seconded.

    Hey... wouldn't it be great if people can switch bodies for a day? Or make that a week because you'll be all confused with just a day... need time to adjust. Be another temperament for a week... they should so make that work.
    No STP better let me swap bodies. I'll run away with it (and seeing as they'd be stuck with MY body, they'd never catch me. Hooray!) or I'd return it with no tread, a burnt clutch and a smoking engine... possibly a few bullet holes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Now that you've lost interest, machine:run, explanation. I wrote a really long one. Way too complicated. Maybe I'll post that somewhere else.

    So basically, I'm not my body. I don't think I am, at least. I think I'm consciousness - part(s) of my brain. We're all attached though. Consciousness, brain, body; good friends.

    Anyway, there's things my body can do pretty well. Like keep blood pumping (brain stem). I can't do much to control that. I'm programmed to coordinate my hands with the eyes, too. I can control that. However, I there's a limitation to being conscious. If I focus on the wrong stuff, I screw up.

    So I want to catch a ball. If I focus on my desire to catch the ball, that won't help me catch the ball. Why? Because I'm consciousness. I can't catch balls - but my good friend the body can. So I pay attention to the body. This is a little unsettling because I'm putting my trust in something that isn't me. My body isn't me.(actually, no, it isn't that unsettling, but with a different example it might be).

    My body is good at catching balls though. Part learned, but natural. So I just let it. How? By focusing on the sensation without trying to make it do anything. That's good advice. Body = the machine = good at catching balls. Consciousness = I = never caught a ball.

    I don't know how MBTI fits into this, but maybe it does.
    VERY interesting...

  5. #125
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    I understand what you mean about your consciousness and your body being separate. The more time you spend focusing on your body's physical movement, the more you become aware that "you" are controlling this machine. And the fact that "you" can make it do some incredible things.
    Something tells me this is an ISTP thing. Probably an IS-P thing.

    It's the same as a driver and a car being separate. Some people are better drivers than others.
    Ain't that the truth. Also, this quote reminded me of 'Being John Malcovich.' Like puppeteers.

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenity View Post
    It's not performance-enhancing like that though. Overall, I think the effects mostly come from being more relaxed and a heightened sensory perception.
    True. I attempted to objectively test this by timing my way through a section of singletrack on my MTB. No considerable difference in time either way.

    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPiranha View Post
    VERY interesting...
    Basically, I'm saying that some things really are just physical operations with the body. There is a difference between feeling something and saying "that means X" and actually just feeling it. To perform a task, I let myself know what I want to do, and then switch to just feeling the sensations. When I just focus on sensation, I perform at my best.
    It takes a certain amount of trust in yourself (or in your body, or ego, or whatever you want to call it) to do this, because you might do it wrong, and that might be embarrassing in some circumstances, and flat out dangerous in others. Everyone feels this - stuff you've done many times before you feel comfortable doing.
    Also, just in case I wasn't clear, I don't actually think of my body as a friend.
    Also, the above generally isn't running through my mind when I'm doing various activities - I'm just doing it. It's just how I'd describe it.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  6. #126
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    Basically, I'm saying that some things really are just physical operations with the body. There is a difference between feeling something and saying "that means X" and actually just feeling it.
    That's an impossibility for me. My brain automatically kicks over and attaches little tags to every action or experience. To take it at face value, I have to override the processing which typically goes on without my notice or permission.

    For instance, when I was being jabbed with about 60 needles yesterday, I thought about this conversation and told myself to pay attention to the physical sensations even though they were unpleasant. I tried to be present. It sort of worked, but I still had to look away while being stuck. I wound up talking to my father instead (or should I say, he talked to me so I wouldn't think about what was happening to me). I don't know how SPs can physically suffer without going mad.


    To perform a task, I let myself know what I want to do, and then switch to just feeling the sensations. When I just focus on sensation, I perform at my best.
    So this switch is consciously executed? Meaning you have control over it?



    Also, just in case I wasn't clear, I don't actually think of my body as a friend.
    Also, the above generally isn't running through my mind when I'm doing various activities - I'm just doing it. It's just how I'd describe it.

    *sigh* Your body was so excited that you were taking it for ice cream today but now I guess it'll have to go cry in its room now that you've denied his friendship. How rude!

  7. #127
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPiranha View Post
    That's an impossibility for me. My brain automatically kicks over and attaches little tags to every action or experience. To take it at face value, I have to override the processing which typically goes on without my notice or permission.
    I think everyone operates like this to some extent. It will happen without your involvement. Your brain will process it and spit out. You can turn this off to some extent.

    For instance, when I was being jabbed with about 60 needles yesterday . . . I tried to be present. It sort of worked, but I still had to look away while being stuck. . . I don't know how SPs can physically suffer without going mad.
    Also, not to give the idea I'm in some constant now mode. If I were being jabbed with 60 needles, I'd stop paying attention and think about something else after needle 5 or so. Allergy test?

    I always look when they stick me. I think that's cool.

    I think of pain as a signal from your body to "pay special attention to __". Once I get the message, I can assess whether or not there's anything productive I can do about it. Also, when you focus on what pain actually feels like, it's usually just heat or pressure. No biggie if it's not permanent.

    So this switch is consciously executed? Meaning you have control over it?
    Yes. It's a developed skill. Like all skills, it takes practice. For example, I found I got a lot better at just focusing on sensation through biking. A thing to understand - bikes have an amazing tendency to follow your eyes. When on a narrow trail, if you fixate on the trees by the side, you'll have an annoying tendency to hit them, but if you just keep your eyes scanning the trail, your body will follow.

    I wanted to practice this skill (plus my balance) so I set up an obstacle course for myself. Basically, just some boards (4 to 8 inches wide) laid across cinderblocks/stacked tires lengthwise. I laid the boards so there were steep inclines/declines /\/\ and some funny angles involved.

    If you attempt this with your mind wandering around, you're not going to do well and you'll fall off the side. If you fixate on the fall on the side, that's where you'll go. If you fixate on the gaps between boards, you'll go off at funny angles and probably fall. This activity FORCES you to pay attention to the feel of your feet on the peddles, visual input, arm position, all while focusing on the board you're riding. Every time I rolled up to the first board, I'd be sure to hit that "off switch."

    After a solid week or so I was able to cross on all 4 inch boards, with rapid /\/\, at a moderate slow pace (harder to balance). It was also cemented into my mind: keep your eyes scanning over the trail you want to cross.

    I don't have my MTB anymore .

    That same attention developed from that activity helped me in other areas having nothing to do with biking. Anything requiring focus on sensation.

    If you don't want to get hurt there are plenty of options of less dangerous activities that cultivate awareness of body/now, but the basic idea is the same: keep your mind on the trail.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  8. #128
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPiranha View Post
    I don't know how SPs can physically suffer without going mad.
    I don't either, that's why I just went ahead and went mad.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  9. #129
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    I think everyone operates like this to some extent. It will happen without your involvement. Your brain will process it and spit out. You can turn this off to some extent.
    The button broke off. It was made in Taiwan.


    Also, not to give the idea I'm in some constant now mode. If I were being jabbed with 60 needles, I'd stop paying attention and think about something else after needle 5 or so. Allergy test?
    Yes. Apparently I'm allergic to tree pollen, dust mites, and mold. Also, Richard Marx's big 80s hair and pantsless troll dolls.

    I always look when they stick me. I think that's cool.
    EW!

    I've never liked it, but recently after being stuck with so many needles and watching my own blood being carried away by the gallon, I couldn't stand to look anymore. Plus, there's something about needles puncturing my skin that I find psychically violating. I can't put my finger on exactly why, but I actually feel, on a very deep level, this sort of resentment, like that needle has no right to invade me. I know - weird.

    Yes. It's a developed skill. Like all skills, it takes practice. For example, I found I got a lot better at just focusing on sensation through biking. A thing to understand - bikes have an amazing tendency to follow your eyes. When on a narrow trail, if you fixate on the trees by the side, you'll have an annoying tendency to hit them, but if you just keep your eyes scanning the trail, your body will follow.

    I wanted to practice this skill (plus my balance) so I set up an obstacle course for myself. Basically, just some boards (4 to 8 inches wide) laid across cinderblocks/stacked tires lengthwise. I laid the boards so there were steep inclines/declines /\/\ and some funny angles involved.

    If you attempt this with your mind wandering around, you're not going to do well and you'll fall off the side. If you fixate on the fall on the side, that's where you'll go. If you fixate on the gaps between boards, you'll go off at funny angles and probably fall. This activity FORCES you to pay attention to the feel of your feet on the peddles, visual input, arm position, all while focusing on the board you're riding. Every time I rolled up to the first board, I'd be sure to hit that "off switch."

    After a solid week or so I was able to cross on all 4 inch boards, with rapid /\/\, at a moderate slow pace (harder to balance). It was also cemented into my mind: keep your eyes scanning over the trail you want to cross.

    I don't have my MTB anymore .
    Interesting! So why don't you have it anymore? Sounds like you enjoyed it terribly.

    I used to feel very engaged when I was out on my horse, even then though I was telling him stories or we were galloping flat out across fields. I'd just drop the reins and turn him loose. It's hard to sync up with the horse unless you're paying attention, esp at "warp" speeds. He could really move.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffster View Post
    I don't either, that's why I just went ahead and went mad.
    Excellent plan. And very energy efficient.

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