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Thread: INTJ seems more literal than ISTJ?

  1. #1
    Permabanned Array
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    May 2007
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    Default INTJ seems more literal than ISTJ?

    Before I start, I would just like to say that I know I could've posted this in the Asperger/Autism forum. But I wanted to start fresh, because this is something I wanted to communicate and have a new, thoughtful discussion about.

    * * * * * *

    Lately, I have been working on a correlation between Asperger Syndrome and the INTJ type. Many sources acknowledge this correlation, but I'm going to attempt to bring some light into it.

    I think that an INTJ is more likely to appear literal in his/her thinking to the observer. This is often a symptom of autistic disorders, but symptoms are based on observations rather than an actual understanding of the patient's inner workings.

    But since Intuition is Introverted, the person is more likely to brood upon the meaning of things rather than understand it immediately. This could also be the source of daydreaming tendencies. Their inferior function is Extraverted Sensing, so they will probably collect the details in their environment and then store them for interpretation later via Ni, which will probably be done alone and likely unknown to others.

    An Extraverted Thinking function could be related to an autistic's tendency to line up their toys. I have experience with this, but I found that such repetitious behavior helps me zone out into my Ni.

    On the other hand, an ISTJ has an easier access to Extraverted Intuition (the INTJ doesn't reach Ne until the shadow functions), which interprets meanings in the here-and-now. And since it's inferior, it will take a common sense approach, making the ISTJ more adept at social conversation.

    The xSTJ type is said to be more socially acceptable (especially in males), which means that they should be adept at understanding social cues -- the meaning of someone's words. And they can in a level that is basic and quick.

    The reason I write this is because I notice a lot of sites that claim autistics are believed to lack imagination and introspection, but at the same time, it is bewildering that a lot of brilliant artists and scientists are now believed to have autistic-like disorders -- many of whom are considered to be of the NT temperament.

    I think the labeling of social disabilities is simply labeling of a personality difference. The SJ type is considered to be the "most normal," and the SJ types are probably the ones more likely to jump to conclusions (via their weaker Extraverted Intuition) and say that their children "has a problem." Children who are diagnosed with ADHD are becoming more common, and it is becoming clear that this is simply related to the entire SP temperament.

    Also, ADD (without Hyperactivity), I think, could in fact be related to Extraverted Intuition in the same way I think AS and HFA (high-functioning autism) is related to Introverted Intuition. The difference is that Extraverted Intuition is more scattered and finds it more difficult to focus on one topic, while Introverted Intuition tends to obsess about matters.

  2. #2
    shoshaku jushaku Array rivercrow's Avatar
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    Apr 2007


    You might want to read the Volume 66, Issue 12 (Dec 2006) of the JPT (Journal of Psychological Type). It deals directly with Type and Autism/Asperger's.

    Here's the abstract. Check with your local university for a copy, or contact CAPT for a reprint (should be under $10).

    Asperger's Syndrome (AS) is a form of autism, which, in many cases, seems indistinguishable from certain of the Jungian/Myers-Briggs personality types. This article explores the relationship between AS and psychological type. Anecdotes on both sides of the question illuminate a review of the literature on AS and type. Direct and often conflicting quotations clarify and contrast these differing views of personality. There are three main findings: First, faulty diagnostic criteria for AS in combination with the pathological bias of contemporary psychology result in the mis diagnosis of the disorder in otherwise normal types. Next, where the diagnosis seems appropriate, poor type development is indicated. Finally, analysis suggests that individuals diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome have type preferences of I_TP, whereas mothers of children with the disorder prefer E_FJ.
    Who rises in the morning, looks in the mirror and says, "I think I will do something stupid today?" -- James Hollis
    If people never did silly things nothing intelligent would ever get done. -- Ludwig Wittgenstein
    Whaling is illegal in Oklahoma.

  3. #3
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    Default Personality type and the autism spectrum

    I have spent a lot of time thinking about and researching the idea of personality/psychological type and the autism spectrum. My research, using Simon Baron-Cohen's Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) questionnaire with 101 'neurotypical' adults showed that Introversion and Thinking were significantly related to total score on the AQ. When I looked at each of the 5 subscales, more trends emerged. The preference for Introversion was significantly related to Social Skills, Attention Switching and Communication skills. Sensing was significantly related to the Imagination subscale. Thinking preferences were significantly related to scores on the Social Skills subscale and Imagination. There were no significant relationships between Judging/Perceiving preferences and any of the subscales.
    These results tend to support the discussion on this blog.
    I am particularly enthusiastic about using personality/psychological type when discussing the autism spectrum because it does not focus on 'pathology'. I emphasize type as learning preferences and how the person prefers to learn. Note the emphasis on learning: I am tired of people focusing on the deficits and not viewing each person as a learner who wants to cope and learn in everyday life. I find that the type/MBTI model is a productive way to look at each individual, to plan appropriate learning environments, to make daily life a lot more understandable and comfortable and to deal productively with stressors.
    Interestingly, in my group of 101 'neurotypical' adults, 2.6 per cent (the exact same per cent found by Baron-Cohen) scored above the cut-off score. That meant that 2.6 per cent of the people exhibited the major characteristics of the autism spectrum but were functioning without any distress or particular concerns.
    What are your thoughts?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Array NewEra's Avatar
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    Dec 2008


    Based on what I know/have read about Asperger's and Autism, I would say it's strongly linked to the IxTJ personality. Although of course no type is directly correlated to Aspie's, but this seems to be the most common personality type that it relates to, based on symptoms, characteristics, etc. Aspie patients are very literal and pay a lot of attention to detail, which stresses the Sensing characteristic, so that seems to lean toward ISTJ. They can also remember facts and dates with great precision. I'm not 100% sure though about the direct correlation.

  5. #5
    Aspie Idealist Array TaylorS's Avatar
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    Aug 2007
    972 so/sp
    EII Ni


    I'm an Aspie and I'm an INFJ.
    Autistic INFP

  6. #6
    my user title is too shor Array polikujm's Avatar
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    Oct 2008


    I always heard it was INTPish, but I can see how it gives off J behaviors.

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