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  1. #1
    Member avaxtskyr's Avatar
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    Default Are blind people more likely to be Sensors?

    Question in the title.
    Thoughts?

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    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    Probably not. I would think that one of their greatest senses being taken away would cause them to rely on intuition more if anything. They have to connect the puzzle pieces that everyone else takes for granted and reshape them to fit into a picture that is unlike how the majority of others 'see' things.

    Aside: I knew a girl who was blind and she was very interested in obscure things. I didnt know her well enough to attempt to type her, but I suppose if I had to go out on a limb I would say INFP.

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    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    I can't imagine that there would be any correlation. Blind people still use senses. They just use different senses. Blind people's brains often reconfigure themselves so that they can "see" by touch. That is, the part of the cortex responsible for visuospatial information gets associated with the sense of touch instead of the sense of vision. There is some truth to the trope that the remaining senses of blind people are heightened.

    I met a blind person once that could tell instantly what note I had played on a piano, and repeat it, just by hearing it. That was amazing to me.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


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    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msg_v2 View Post
    I can't imagine that there would be any correlation. Blind people still use senses. They just use different senses. Blind people's brains often reconfigure themselves so that they can "see" by touch. That is, the part of the cortex responsible for visuospatial information gets associated with the sense of touch instead of the sense of vision. There is some truth to the trope that the remaining senses of blind people are heightened.

    I met a blind person once that could tell instantly what note I had played on a piano, and repeat it, just by hearing it. That was amazing to me.
    I thought of that too, but I do think that they would actually be a tiny bit more likely to be intuitives. Not that intuition equals social isolation or anything, but I would think that being blind would sort of cut down on people who feel comfortable enough to befriend you. That might lead to more solitary creative pursuits, more inside of a persons head. I suppose piano could be included in that, but piano players can be very intuitive. Not saying blindness equates to being an intuitive or a sensor, and definately blind people have to probably rely on sense of touch and sound more, but like how a sighted individual doesn't always focus totally on their eyes, a blind person might not rely primarily on their senses.

    Related to what I said earlier, would there be a difference between the number of blind sensors/intuitives who were born blind vs those who acquired it later in life?

    I suppose that goes back to whether personality is inborn or influenced by enviroment/ life events.

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avaxtskyr View Post
    Question in the title.
    Thoughts?
    Sure, how'd you come up with question? Do you think there's a viable reason (or even a documented one) why blind people might be more likely to be sensors, in your opinion?
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

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    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty6226 View Post
    I thought of that too, but I do think that they would actually be a tiny bit more likely to be intuitives. Not that intuition equals social isolation or anything, but I would think that being blind would sort of cut down on people who feel comfortable enough to befriend you. That might lead to more solitary creative pursuits, more inside of a persons head. I suppose piano could be included in that, but piano players can be very intuitive. Not saying blindness equates to being an intuitive or a sensor, and definately blind people have to probably rely on sense of touch and sound more, but like how a sighted individual doesn't always focus totally on their eyes, a blind person might not rely primarily on their senses.

    Related to what I said earlier, would there be a difference between the number of blind sensors/intuitives who were born blind vs those who acquired it later in life?

    I suppose that goes back to whether personality is inborn or influenced by enviroment/ life events.
    I guess, as you said, we'd have to look at to what extent environment influences personality. Studies about Big 5 traits, which correlate to MBTI to some extent, might prove effective at demonstrating this. Some studies have shown that different regions of the U.S. have different personality traits, and this probably interacts with someone's internal disposition. For example, growing up in the Northeast has probably made me more "uninhibited" (or perhaps sloppy and abrasive, to other people's eyes) than someone living in other parts of the country. But, of course, I also got a job where I have to interact with people from other regions, so I have to tamp down on that if I want to stay employed.

    I also think it is not useful to use MBTI as an identity. That is, I don't think it's healthy to look down on other types, or assume that, say, someone you dislike is an ESFJ. INTPs can be extremely irritating, too, and ESFJs can be awesome.

    I think, if you want to learn more about how people function, you should gather some data, and then form a theory around that, rather than forming a theory around a theory as a kind of shortcut. I'm not sure if that's what you're doing, but that's something I've been guilty of, which is the only reason I bring it up.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


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  7. #7
    Suave y Fuerte BadOctopus's Avatar
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    I assume you're talking about people who are born blind, not people who lose their sight at some point in their lives.

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    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadOctopus View Post
    I assume you're talking about people who are born blind, not people who lose their sight at some point in their lives.
    Do you think that would cause a significant difference?

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    Suave y Fuerte BadOctopus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty6226 View Post
    Do you think that would cause a significant difference?
    Well, yeah. I mean, you can always develop your inferior traits, so a person who went blind might eventually get better at Sensing, but would he actually change his type? I doubt it.

  10. #10
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    The process of experiencing things through the senses (which all human beings do) is not the same as a definition for patterns in cognition.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.
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