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  1. #21
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    Typology served the purpose of helping me assert the fact that, just because my family said otherwise, I'm still a normal human being.

    Experience in life is what brought about self awareness.

  2. #22
    Unapologetic being Evolving Transparency's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tem View Post
    I understand myself by disagreeing with others -- it's through conflict and action that I start hearing my own voice
    I relate to this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keirouen View Post
    I've always known I'm not like most people. I stand out in both good and bad ways. I can blend into the crowd but as soon as we start talking it's pretty immediate.
    And I also relate to this.

    And this was one of the reasons why I've always been into typology. For the first time I felt like I wasn't alone. It was nice.

    ***

    As for the OP, my answer put simply is no. I would not know myself as much or as fast as I'd like to with some tools like typology. I know it's a never ending process though. I just think it's a good tool for me personally cause I am quick to judge the competence of others around me. I used to really just think that every though the same way. In this way typology is like a reminder for me to let go. Like I'll remind myself "People aren't stupid, they're just different."

    And I'd just like to add, that I think that the enneagram and instincts helped me grow the most. I never would have acknowledged things about myself at the rate that I have without it.
    "Once the game is over, the Pawn and the King go back into the same box"

    Freedom isn't free.
    "Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear." ~ Orwell
    I'm that person that embodies pretty much everything that you hate. Might as well get used to it.
    Unapologetically bonding in an uninhibited, propelled manner
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  3. #23
    Senior Member Ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caw the rooks View Post
    So: would you have a difficult time with understanding yourself without a typological framework in which you can categorize your traits? Is it necessary to have this framework to quantify how you function, or is it mere interest that brought you to them?
    I wouldn't say a framework is necessary. When the astrology threads were more active I realized it's not the system itself that draws me in, it's the way the system provides a possible insight into my inner workings that I can then analyze. Typology makes me think about things in a more thorough way and helps facilitate introspection. I considered myself introspective, but I realized there's usually an external source that I internalize and study. When I was younger, those external sources were stories and accounts of other people's experiences that made me think, "Would I do that?" or "How would I feel?" Typology gives me a framework to toy with and specific terms and concepts to use when exploring the mechanics of how I am.

    When I don't have something to chew on, it doesn't occur to me to question how I operate. It just is what it is. Typology points me toward possibilities and makes me aware of some biases. I don't think I'd understand myself as well without it. It's likely I'd have focused on another area for self-improvement and self-understanding.

  4. #24
    Member Tem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caw the rooks View Post
    So do you have a hard time identifying with or appreciating people because of themselves as a whole rather than their set of characteristics?
    No, not quite, I do see value in everyone. I just have to actively stop myself from automatically trying to categorize actions and behaviors into a system.

    I tend to take small bits of information and try to project a full-length image from it, so that's how I use these systems.

    I see you identify with INTJ; so this would be a manifestation of Te. I wonder if those that identify with Te > Ti will have an easier time working with these systems. It seems logical that these types would naturally be attuned to finding use and working within their paradigms.
    Well there are many schools of thought -- it can also logically appeal to Fe types as a way to make sense *Ti* of their observations of others' characters *Fe*.

    That's interesting... so it's almost like a source of control, and perhaps comfort, for you? You latch onto these external systems to keep you stable?
    Not stable but it is interesting to take a backseat approach sometimes.

  5. #25
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    I understand myself quite well without a categorizing system, sometimes the systems can just confuse the matter because I have the tendency to try to put everything into the system. (typical INTP issue ) A system no matter how well designed, can't explain every little quirk about someone. Systems are approximations and should be treated as such. You want to find a career you'll likely be satisfied with. A system can help to some extent. People of the same type tend to favor some types of careers and disfavor others but it's by no means failproof. That INTP in the corner just might make a great salesperson, but their approach to the job will probably be different than an ESFJ would take.
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  6. #26
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    I understand myself at a deep level with or without a typology system. I think that's how I recognized myself in the 4w5 description so readily, because I already knew I had those issues, traits and motivations. I actually wonder if people who take longer to type are just less self aware. Either that or less forthcoming about the negative side of their knowledge of self. Someone should do a study on that: which types accurately type quickest. I do have some theories there.
    Find my Enneagram writing here. Also, I'd love for you to take my six question Enneagram surveyEnneagram survey!✨

  7. #27
    Senior Member Sanjuro's Avatar
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    I actually knew myself better BEFORE I got into typology. The large numbers of things I read about what could "potentially" be true of me (being about 16 years old when I discovered the enneagram) just led me on a years-long wild goose chase. Doesn't help that there are many stereotypes floating around out there which, frankly, confuse those who haven't done hardcore reading and internalized the system in nuanced depth.

    Quote Originally Posted by small.wonder View Post
    I actually wonder if people who take longer to type are just less self aware. Either that or less forthcoming about the negative side of their knowledge of self.
    I have some experience with this topic, so I'll respond. I got told this a lot on other forums, actually, except minus the scientific curiosity and respectful wording you have exhibited. (I.e., they said things like "You just don't know yourself." "You just can't admit it" "You're in denial, you silly fool".) I can't speak for anyone else who has mistyped for years, but I am all too aware of the more negative aspects of myself, and most of those traits are typically assigned to types other than my own. My core type is not really what "my problem" is in life. (People I've discussed this with IRL actually don't believe me about my core so...it's not just my own idiocy here.)

    I do think Ne-doms are inclined to mistype, however--in my experience, it creates a personality that shows different sides of itself to different people; extraverts then tend to accept outward definitions of themselves. Worse, there is a marked tendency to float multiple possibilities and lose focus of the the "essence". I believe this was the other part of my mistype adventures.

  8. #28
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    there are different parts of ourselves.

    before typology, i knew myself fairly well. i recognized myself immediately in the ENFP description, and have consistently tested as that type, much like @small.wonder said.

    where typology has helped was in being able to talk about it and think about different aspects of my personality more specifically, like @sunyata said. it helps to give something a name.

    i wouldn't say i know myself better now that i've put a bunch of labels on myself. i would, though, say that i'm better at accepting and working with myself as i am, and have a better idea of where improvements or growth are needed, and what a more balanced, mature version of myself would look like.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  9. #29
    Junior Member PlayWithFire's Avatar
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    I was drawn to MBTI several years ago while working to find a deeper understanding of myself. I've always been introspective and found learning about myself (as well as others) interesting. Personally, I don't find that having a set framework, MBTI or otherwise, is necessary for me to be able to understand myself.. But I think that it has helped me by allowing me to recognize certain patterns, develop new questions, etc.

    I actually stepped away from MBTI for a long time because I found it too restrictive. I dislike how it can be used to pigeonhole everyone into some rigid little box. That said, I think it can be quite helpful - when used in a more general sense - to further knowledge of one's self.

  10. #30
    So she did. small.wonder's Avatar
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    One more thought: I think where Enneagram has helped my understanding, is with others. I used to be so confused by the actions of others and the conflicts I would find myself in, knowing where that person is coming from has made worlds of difference. That said, I can see how the system could be horribly abused-- I just make an intentional effort not to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjuro View Post
    I actually knew myself better BEFORE I got into typology. The large numbers of things I read about what could "potentially" be true of me (being about 16 years old when I discovered the enneagram) just led me on a years-long wild goose chase. Doesn't help that there are many stereotypes floating around out there which, frankly, confuse those who haven't done hardcore reading and internalized the system in nuanced depth.
    Yeah, I don't think that's unusual (and this is exactly why I keep typology away from the high school kids I volunteer with). If theory has it right, most people who do that fall somewhere on the 3, 6, 9 spectrum. I know a handful of individuals who qualify and have talked with them about it, but I (obviously) believe other types can and do mistype as well. Hardcore reading is crucile, one of the common threads running through the people I've talked to is shallow (or no) reading. Seriously? Over-reading can land you in the same undecided spot though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjuro View Post
    I have some experience with this topic, so I'll respond. I got told this a lot on other forums, actually, except minus the scientific curiosity and respectful wording you have exhibited. (I.e., they said things like "You just don't know yourself." "You just can't admit it" "You're in denial, you silly fool".) I can't speak for anyone else who has mistyped for years, but I am all too aware of the more negative aspects of myself, and most of those traits are typically assigned to types other than my own. My core type is not really what "my problem" is in life. (People I've discussed this with IRL actually don't believe me about my core so...it's not just my own idiocy here.)

    I do think Ne-doms are inclined to mistype, however--in my experience, it creates a personality that shows different sides of itself to different people; extraverts then tend to accept outward definitions of themselves. Worse, there is a marked tendency to float multiple possibilities and lose focus of the the "essence". I believe this was the other part of my mistype adventures.
    Right, and I hope you realize that's not what I intended or meant at all. I could never presume to know an individual better than they do themselves, but I have been shocked at the way people I know really well falsely see themselves. Example: My 2 Mom completely denied (at first) having pride issues or only doing things for others to get love back. After reading, she took it more seriously and agreed. I know others who are just really confused about who they are and what they feel. Most people tend to identify correctly if they are relatively emotionally healthy and after narrowing it down to a couple types, are given some time with the text (I've mostly used The Wisdom of The Enneagram). Most of the confused and or mistyped people I come across really have been 3, 6 or 9 though, which actually surprised me at first (I didn't really expect it to ring true). It does make sense in theory though.
    Find my Enneagram writing here. Also, I'd love for you to take my six question Enneagram surveyEnneagram survey!✨

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