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Thread: MBTI criticism?

  1. #11
    lurking.... Wyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alcea rosea View Post
    Lately I have started to wonder if MBTI is taken too seriously by people (including me too). I mean, the theory is not even proven to be valid or reliable according to some criticism. So, people are defining themselves according to the theory, judging other people according to it and putting people to boxes. Before I saw no danger in the whole thing. I said to myself that I use the MBTI tool only to understand people but lately I have started to see some dangers related to the whole thing.

    Is there even anything behind in the traits, the functions and in the personality types? Is it any different that astrology?

    My answer to all of this: I don't know. That is why I'm asking.

    Your thoughts on the subject?
    When it comes to relationships, I think that it shouldn't matter what type people are. Whether or not you're compatible/incompatible according to MBTI didn't matter 4,000 years ago.

    Relationships take hard, hard work and require a high level of commitment. If both people are willing to work at it, I don't see why some of the worst-suited types should think twice about starting something.

    BUT, MBTI certainly has its commonsense applications. An INFJ, like me, for example, can use it to help them find/narrow down what kind of job they'd be suited for as opposed to jumping into some horribly suited job, like accounting.

    I'm still uber-new to MBTI but it seems like if someone spent a good amount of time observing themselves, how they act around others in different situations, likes and dislikes, that they'd be able to come up with a rough (and I mean ROUGH) understanding of how their personality works.

    The nice thing about MBTI is that someone's already gone through the trouble of all the head-work. We get to take the test, and go 'Oh! I'm a ____.'

    How seriously should MBTI be taken? Well, someone could conceivably, if they already haven't, come up with a similar test that tells you what political party you're in. But if I took such a test I would certainly take it with a grain of salt and make my own decisions given the situation at hand.
    Similarly, I think MBTI should not be given a status of infallibility, but should be used as a self-discovery/learning tool that can be deviated from at any time.

    No matter how you look at it, though, it's thought provoking and addictive as all get out.

  2. #12
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyst View Post
    When it comes to relationships, I think that it shouldn't matter what type people are. Whether or not you're compatible/incompatible according to MBTI didn't matter 4,000 years ago.

    Relationships take hard, hard work and require a high level of commitment. If both people are willing to work at it, I don't see why some of the worst-suited types should think twice about starting something.

    BUT, MBTI certainly has its commonsense applications. An INFJ, like me, for example, can use it to help them find/narrow down what kind of job they'd be suited for as opposed to jumping into some horribly suited job, like accounting.

    I'm still uber-new to MBTI but it seems like if someone spent a good amount of time observing themselves, how they act around others in different situations, likes and dislikes, that they'd be able to come up with a rough (and I mean ROUGH) understanding of how their personality works.

    The nice thing about MBTI is that someone's already gone through the trouble of all the head-work. We get to take the test, and go 'Oh! I'm a ____.'

    How seriously should MBTI be taken? Well, someone could conceivably, if they already haven't, come up with a similar test that tells you what political party you're in. But if I took such a test I would certainly take it with a grain of salt and make my own decisions given the situation at hand.
    Similarly, I think MBTI should not be given a status of infallibility, but should be used as a self-discovery/learning tool that can be deviated from at any time.

    No matter how you look at it, though, it's thought provoking and addictive as all get out.
    EXACTLY!!!
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Ilah's Avatar
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    I probably haven't been studying this as long as most long-timers, but here is my initial impression.

    As a tool for self understanding, it is one of the best. This is compairing it with various psychology, pop psychology, New Age and self help books.

    It help reinforces the idea that different is not wrong or some mental problem or attitude problem.

    I don't think it explains the whole of me, but it does give me important pieces of the puzzle.

    As for helping explain why most people don't seem to understand me, it is a pretty useful tool. It certainly is better than previous alternatives: People can't understand what I say because they are stupid and clueless. There must be something wrong with me because I can't make people understand.

    It helps in providing a forum where I can talk about some of this self understanding, self improvement with people who can understand. I can also write about more unusual traits (associated with the rare types) and people won't look down on me for being different.

    As far as typing other people (significant other, family, friends, co-workers) that can run into problems. Type might be a the reason you don't get along, but there are lots of other possible reasons as well. To blame it all on type might hide the real issue.

    I think you run into problems as well when you judge potential friends or dates by their type. You could end a happy relationship/friendship before it starts because you have rejected a person based on type.

    As far as analyzing characters from movies and books, that is all just in fun. I find analyzing things fun and I am happy to find other people that do as well.

    Ilah

  4. #14
    lurking.... Wyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    EXACTLY!!!
    Weeeeeeeee!

  5. #15
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    1. People forget that MBTI is a classification system and think it makes predictions.
    2. People forget that MBTI is a crude classification system and think it represents the entire personality and don't engage other parts of the personality.
    3. People forget that MBTI is a crude classification system and think it represents the entire person.
    4. People box others or themselves into a type, thinking it is unchanging, and steer behavior and conversation to be consistent with that expectation.
    5. People forget that MBTI is a classification system and incorrectly believe that people are actually born with a certain configuration of 4 letters.
    6. People overestimate the consistency of a person's type, which is in flux.
    7. The theory is unfalsifiable and lends itself more to pseudoscience than to science.
    8. People overestimate its value as a classification system and use it to model problems, complexes, neuroses, and dynamics which extend beyond type classification.

  6. #16
    Senior Member alcea rosea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    1. People forget that MBTI is a classification system and think it makes predictions,
    2. People forget that MBTI is a crude classification system and think it represents the entire personality and don't engage other parts of the personality.
    3. People forget that MBTI is a crude classification system and think it represents the entire person.
    4. People box others or themselves into a type, thinking it is unchanging, and steer behavior and conversation to be consistent with that expectation.
    5. People forget that MBTI is a classification system and incorrectly believe that people are actually born with a certain configuration of 4 letters.
    6. People overestimate the consistency of a person's type, which is in flux.
    7. The theory is unfalsifiable and lends itself more to pseudoscience than to science.
    8. People overestimate its value as a classification system and use it to model problems, complexes, neuroses, and dynamics which extend beyond type classification.
    This was a really good post! Thanks!

  7. #17
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    I think that Socionics has the much more believable and broad model.
    I tend to prefer broad models too.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

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  8. #18
    Senior Member bluebell's Avatar
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    Depends how you use it. I'm somewhat clueless with people skills and I've found it helpful for giving me a broadbrush understanding of what makes other people tick. I had been unconciously assuming everyone else was like me and getting frustrated by the differences, especially at work and with some of my friends.

    I've found it most useful as using the different types as a very rough first draft for working out what people are like and how they think - then I fill in the details (ie other aspects of personality) later. I'm occasionally prone to biases but overall I'm glad I've learnt about it.
    ...so much smoke pouring out of each chromosome.

  9. #19
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Honestly I am beginning to wonder myself alcea. When I first discovered MBTI I embraced it because it all finally made sense to me why I was so different to everyone around me. Now apparently I am just like the majority of the population I live amongst. I have been stripped of my intuitive function from my online peers and now have to suffer like every other shithead who voted for bush. we are all doomed! DOOMED!
    Time is a delicate mistress.

  10. #20
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    MBTI was hoisted by Mrs Briggs and her daughter Mrs Meyers.

    It was hoisted from a book called, "Personality Types", by Carl Gustav Jung.

    And although Carl was quite safe in Switzerland, he volunteered to collaborate with the German National Socialist Workers' Party (the NAZI Party).

    The German National Socialist Workers' Party came very close to absolute evil in carrying out the Shoah.

    So it is no surprise to find that, "Personality Types", and MBTI are forms of reification.

    And it is no surprise to find MBTI appeals to those who have failed to individuate.

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