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  1. #1
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
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    Default Risk Tolerance and MBTI

    I recently found an interesting article about MBTI type and risk tolerance.

    Some things I expected to see were there, like ENTPs tend to take the most risks (ISTJs and ISFJs don't), but there was also some other stuff that surprised me.

    Here's where I got the article from: "Risk Aversion and Personality Type" Filbeck, Greg; Hatfield, Patricia; Horvath, Philip; Journal of Behavioral Finance; vol.6(4); 2005. pp.170-180

    "Consistent with our hypothesis, we find that individuals with a preference for thinking, T, tend to be more risk-tolerant than those with a preference for feeling (F), with regard to both skew and variance. Furthermore, individuals with a slight preference for thinking (T) are almost as risk averse as those with a very clear preference for feeling (F). Risk tolerance diminishes rapidly as the MBTI scores move from a very clear preference for thinking (T) to a slight preference for thinking (T), which reflects the non-linearity of the relationships.

    The judging (J)-perceiving (P) dimension of personality is significant and non-linear in explaining risk tolerance. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we find that individuals with a preference for judging (J) tended to be able to tolerate much more variance than those with a preference for perceiving (P). However, judging-perceiving differences in personality do not appear to make a difference in regard to skew preferences.

    Likewise, we find that individuals with a preference for sensing (S) are willing to tolerate more upside or downside potential than those with a preference for intuition (S). The sensing-intuition dimension did not indicate any differences with regard to risk tolerance as measured by variance. Finally, we find that preferences for introversion (I) or extraversion (E) did not have significant impact on individual risk tolerance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Nighthawk's Avatar
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    Would explain why I am pretty risk intolerant as an NP. Sucks.

  3. #3
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    So is it saying that Js are as tolerant of risk as Ps, if not more so, or am I misreading?
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  4. #4
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    So is it saying that Js are as tolerant of risk as Ps, if not more so, or am I misreading?
    That's what is sounds like. It doesn't reflect any of my past, that's for sure. Back when I was doing finance, I'm pretty sure I could say that at least as far as financial risk goes (variance), Ps were far more accepting. What I do know is that SJs would accept risk once presented, regardless of outcome, where NPs would get cold feet. Perhaps that is what they measured... interesting. I'll have to read the whole thing to see if I'm simply mistaken.

  5. #5
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Keirsey reports that ENTPs are the biggest risk takers.

    SPs should be too, but because they tend to be less far-sighted than the ENTPs, they run into problems when taking risks. So they can not do this consistently.

    Also, another way to think of this is that ENTPs frequently see a myriad of possibilities to happen in their lives and tend to be less afraid of making mistakes because they usually have plenty to fall back on in case something goes south on them.

    They tend to do this a lot in relationships especially, since they tend not to value the emotional connection as much as the ENFPs, and they are experiential learners, they take risks for the sake of learning. And usually have few regrets about that because, in the worst case scenario, they will lose a relationship (usually a casual friendship) that they could easily get replaced in the future.

    INTPs may be less willing to take risks simply because they can not afford to make as many mistakes because they have less opportunities in their lives.

    But again, the main reason why ENTPs would be the biggest risk takers is because Ne loves adventures (just like Se, and it can see more than the Se and the ENTPs carry their risks out a bit smoother because Ne often takes variables in consideration that escape the notice of Se) and is able to carry them out in a congenial fashion, as well as that ENTPs are less likely to be paralyzed by the fear of making a mistake because they could more easily compensate for their error, or in the worst case move on while incurring as least deleterious of injuries as possible.

    As for more on why the INTP could be averse to risk-taking--Introverted Thinking is an Introverted Judging function---it is profondly different from Extroverted Intuition--an Extroverted Perceiving function. If the latter is not involved in the diet of the INTP's thought, his behavior may appear very 'un-NPish'. This is why it is easy for IPs to get 'stuck in a rut'.

    As for saying that Sensors are more likely to take risks, they are probably referring to the 'SPish risks'--everyday kind of risks that we all can take. NPs would probably say they are not worthwhile because they see the big picture. Yet SPs just may take them on impulse.

    Though as far as taking necessary risks is concerned, ENTPs would be the most willing to do this, because they could do well to assess the potential outcomes that could ensue from this.

    INTJs may be able to do this better, but I doubt it, since their Ni vision is less in tune with reality than Ne, and their J makes the more cautious.

    As for Ts being more inclined to take risks--this could be explained in terms of them being more competent in the world of decision-making, as it is clear that in the Western society there will be more situations where you are more likely to be forced to make impersonal judgments than personal.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

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  6. #6
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Well, after skimming it, I'm not that impressed. It never helps when the first thing I see is the E:I divide at 75:25. I have a hard time trusting anyone when using these kinds of figures.

    But mostly it's the risk test at the bottom. It's not an objective measure of risk in real life situations, but rather a test of requirements - this could easily bias the answers towards SJs (who would "require" a certain level of wealth, and be willing to risk everything to get it) rather than the non-material NPs who don't require it.

    I don't mind the sample size of 68... but to control for 9 factors at the same time, while not impossible, makes me skeptical.

    But all that aside, I'm so strongly NP that I should be drastically risk averse, when I'm anything but.

    All that said, the findings, for what they are, seem solid.

    (They also disagree with FFM research: http://facultyresearch.london.edu/docs/risk.ps.pdf )

  7. #7
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    This is inconsistent with past research, such as the one that ptgatsby links to, so I would be inclined to be somewhat skeptical of the article before reading the methods section.

  8. #8
    Senior Member niffer's Avatar
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    (: I like adventures..
    sparkly sparkly rainbow excretions

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    holy shit am I a feeler?
    if you like my avatar, it's because i took it myself! : D

  9. #9
    Senior Member Shimpei's Avatar
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    Oh, damn, here's your SJ who tends to run away from taking any risks.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Hmm. I'm generally more comfortable with risk-taking and change than my INTP partner is.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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