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  1. #1
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    Default Music, music... music

    I am an ENTP and I love music. I don't know how to play an instrument or how to conduct or even how to sing properly, but I find music an intellectual stimuli. I usually mumble melodies from classical music and I sing many tunes when I am reading or when I am in the bathroom. I want to ask if it is mbti related (my bet is it's not) or if it's generic to all people.
    The best thing about human beings is that they stack so neatly.

  2. #2
    Senior Member AzulEyes's Avatar
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    I never thought of it as being MBTI related. I have always thought of it as genetic. Everyone in my family is musical in some way- plays an instrument or sings. I feel like everyone listens to music to some degree. Seems so entirely universal.

    As for playing an instrument- it's never too late. You should try it.

    I know for some NT types that I know- they use the lyrics of music to express feelings they hold inside that they have trouble expressing. For me as an NF, I like music at times where I have too much stimulation and need to change my mood- say to something more calm. I might also use it to do the opposite- to pump me up say - to exercise.

    Music is an escape. In a group setting- it is ambience. If I throw a party- music is key for the type of vibe I am trying to put off. I am always bewildered to walk into a party with NO music whatsoever. I think it's even more important than the food! Doesn't mean it has to be blasting loud- but it should be there.

    Okay- that was a long rant to your basic question.
    It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are. ~e.e. cummings

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzulEyes View Post
    I never thought of it as being MBTI related. I have always thought of it as genetic. Everyone in my family is musical in some way- plays an instrument or sings. I feel like everyone listens to music to some degree. Seems so entirely universal.

    As for playing an instrument- it's never too late. You should try it.

    I know for some NT types that I know- they use the lyrics of music to express feelings they hold inside that they have trouble expressing. For me as an NF, I like music at times where I have too much stimulation and need to change my mood- say to something more calm. I might also use it to do the opposite- to pump me up say - to exercise.

    Music is an escape. In a group setting- it is ambience. If I throw a party- music is key for the type of vibe I am trying to put off. I am always bewildered to walk into a party with NO music whatsoever. I think it's even more important than the food! Doesn't mean it has to be blasting loud- but it should be there.

    Okay- that was a long rant to your basic question.
    Well I won't expect a better answer to my question.
    The best thing about human beings is that they stack so neatly.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALL-HAIL-ME View Post
    I am an ENTP and I love music. I don't know how to play an instrument or how to conduct or even how to sing properly, but I find music an intellectual stimuli. I usually mumble melodies from classical music and I sing many tunes when I am reading or when I am in the bathroom. I want to ask if it is mbti related (my bet is it's not) or if it's generic to all people.
    What music do you like? What do you like about it?
    I think you have an auditory mind, one that is centered on sound. That's cool.

  5. #5
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    I think that melodies, as well as thought out lyrics provides a not so harsh way of truly connecting with the emotions one's self would not readily approve in another context.
    Hence some people have a predisposition of losing one self in the flow of notes, experiencing all these feelings in a way that is all so free of judgement and of prejudice all in relation to one's core persona, and collective experience of the world.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanton Moore View Post
    What music do you like? What do you like about it?
    I think you have an auditory mind, one that is centered on sound. That's cool.
    I like classical music (Beethoven, Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart), movie soundtracks, jazz, blues, musical theatre and opera (especially Verdi).
    I like classical music because it's like an entity that seduces and conquers your every molecule. It can be happy, sad, powerful, weak, etc. It also helps me concentrate and sharpen my mind.
    I like movie soundtracks because via their melodies, they transfer you to a certain moment. Usually I create my own fantasy scenarios while I'm listening to movie soundtracks. It's a creative stimuli.
    Jazz and blues are the types of music that I like mainly because of the existence of improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation and shuffle notes. It's a highly improvising music.
    Finally I like musical theatre and opera because they incorporate both the characteristics of classical music but also they have a story, a main plot. Whenever I listen to the lyrics I fantasize of the possibilities that the plot of the song offers.
    The best thing about human beings is that they stack so neatly.

  7. #7
    Senior Member reckful's Avatar
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    The statistics in the MBTI Manual show strong correlations between artistic/aesthetic interests and an N preference.

    It's widely accepted (and I agree) that the Big Five Openness to Experience factor is essentially tapping into the same underlying human temperament dimension as MBTI S/N, and being high on Openness (the Big Five equivalent of an N preference) is associated with aesthetic interests of all kinds — in both the verbal and non-verbal arts.

    The most well-established version of the Big Five is McCrae and Costa's NEO-PI-R, which breaks down each of the five factors into six "facets." One of the Openness to Experience facets is Aesthetics, and McCrae and Costa note that "high scorers on this scale have a deep appreciation for art and beauty. ... They need not have artistic talent. ... However, for many of them, interest in the arts will lead them to develop a wider knowledge and appreciation than the average individual."

    The Big Five Inventory is one of the more well-regarded (and academically sanctioned) Big Five tests, and its 44 items include the following three (all of which test for Openness to Experience):

    • Has few artistic interests [reverse-scored]
    • Values artistic, aesthetic experiences
    • Is sophisticated in art, music, or literature

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by reckful View Post
    The statistics in the MBTI Manual show strong correlations between artistic/aesthetic interests and an N preference.

    It's widely accepted (and I agree) that the Big Five Openness to Experience factor is essentially tapping into the same underlying human temperament dimension as MBTI S/N, and being high on Openness (the Big Five equivalent of an N preference) is associated with aesthetic interests of all kinds — in both the verbal and non-verbal arts.

    The most well-established version of the Big Five is McCrae and Costa's NEO-PI-R, which breaks down each of the five factors into six "facets." One of the Openness to Experience facets is Aesthetics, and McCrae and Costa note that "high scorers on this scale have a deep appreciation for art and beauty. ... They need not have artistic talent. ... However, for many of them, interest in the arts will lead them to develop a wider knowledge and appreciation than the average individual."

    The Big Five Inventory is one of the more well-regarded (and academically sanctioned) Big Five tests, and its 44 items include the following three (all of which test for Openness to Experience):

    • Has few artistic interests [reverse-scored]
    • Values artistic, aesthetic experiences
    • Is sophisticated in art, music, or literature
    I take back what I said earlier. That's one of the best answers. Thanks for all the statistical arguments and examples.
    The best thing about human beings is that they stack so neatly.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by reckful View Post
    The statistics in the MBTI Manual show strong correlations between artistic/aesthetic interests and an N preference.

    It's widely accepted (and I agree) that the Big Five Openness to Experience factor is essentially tapping into the same underlying human temperament dimension as MBTI S/N, and being high on Openness (the Big Five equivalent of an N preference) is associated with aesthetic interests of all kinds — in both the verbal and non-verbal arts.

    The most well-established version of the Big Five is McCrae and Costa's NEO-PI-R, which breaks down each of the five factors into six "facets." One of the Openness to Experience facets is Aesthetics, and McCrae and Costa note that "high scorers on this scale have a deep appreciation for art and beauty. ... They need not have artistic talent. ... However, for many of them, interest in the arts will lead them to develop a wider knowledge and appreciation than the average individual."

    The Big Five Inventory is one of the more well-regarded (and academically sanctioned) Big Five tests, and its 44 items include the following three (all of which test for Openness to Experience):

    • Has few artistic interests [reverse-scored]
    • Values artistic, aesthetic experiences
    • Is sophisticated in art, music, or literature
    I can see where this comes from, but I speak from a real life experience with real people...SFPs are one of the most artistic! Those with strong Fi even more. I know an ISFP who is a designer, ESFP who is animator and caricaturist, ISFP who is sculpturer, ESFP who is fashion designer, ESFP who is a drummer and ISFP singer... And these people are by far my best friends and best people I know. They are so creative and inspiring!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polly View Post
    I can see where this comes from, but I speak from a real life experience with real people...SFPs are one of the most artistic! Those with strong Fi even more. I know an ISFP who is a designer, ESFP who is animator and caricaturist, ISFP who is sculpturer, ESFP who is fashion designer, ESFP who is a drummer and ISFP singer... And these people are by far my best friends and best people I know. They are so creative and inspiring!
    I think that SFPs have artistic talents, while intuitives have, as reckful stated, a general interest in the arts which leads them to develop a wide knowledge and appreciation.
    The best thing about human beings is that they stack so neatly.

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