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  1. #1
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    Default The Pros to Being a Psychopath

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...176019901.html

    the Oxford research psychologist argues that psychopathic personality traits—charm, confidence, ruthlessness, coolness under pressure—can, in the right doses, be a good thing. Not all psychopaths are violent, he says, and some of them are just the sort of people society can count on in a crisis.


    Psychopath, AKA, ISTP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by funtensity View Post
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...176019901.html



    Psychopath, AKA, ISTP.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    I think the whole thing has to do with healthy vs unhealthy.

    There are good people who value efficiency in the world, just as there are bad people who value compassion.

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    What's the definition of "bad" again? If someone was compassionate, I don't know if I would label them "bad."
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

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    Hope this thread takes off.

    There are some ideas here I would like to see expanded.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    What's the definition of "bad" again? If someone was compassionate, I don't know if I would label them "bad."
    What I was trying to get across was that people are different.

    Some are born with greater or lesser degrees of inclination towards compassion (or maybe understand compassion differently).

    That inclination (aka who we are as an individual) does not decide whether or not we are good or bad as a person, our actions do.

    To put it in MBTI terms, the fact that you are an NTJ does not make you a bad person anymore than being an FP makes you a good person.

    Bringing it full circle, psychopathic traits (in healthy individuals) benefit society. Those traits aren't bad per se, it's how they're used that determines ones character.

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    Quote Originally Posted by funtensity View Post
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...176019901.html



    Psychopath, AKA, ISTP.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    ISTP is usually associated with sociopathy. Psychopaths usually come across as extroverts (even though the claim is you shouldn't try to type sociopaths/psychopaths due to brain damage).

    The problem with psychopaths (even the non-violent ones) is that they are inherently self-centered. Even if they don't resort to violent crime, they tend to always make their presence known by doing other underhanded things. And, at the end of the day, they are usually non-violent because they don't have to be. If the situation calls for it, or they have to become so to get what they want, then they won't hesitate. They are almost always a drain on the people around them. Then again, this can be said for people that aren't psychopaths.

    I don't have any pros to add, because the quote lists pretty much all I can think of. Also, you can have all the pros of a psychopath without actually being one, so there is usually no need to resort to finding a psychopath to get those things.

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    Senior Member SensEye's Avatar
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    The article in the OP is deliberatly playing down the bad traits of psychopaths. Those being lack of compassion and empathy and lack of guilt. Low scores on those fronts are almost always a bad thing.

    I might argue society has a little too much tolerance for psychopaths. This is why ruthless businessmen (i.e. sweatshop owners, CEOs that bankrupt pension plans while extracting millions of personal profits from a corporation) and corrupt politicians are so common. They do immoral things but gloss over it with success and/or boldy lie about their offences to the extent people actually believe they are innocent (when they know full well they are not). They often get away with their wrong doings, encouraging other like minded individuals to mimic their actions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CapLawyer View Post
    ISTP is usually associated with sociopathy. Psychopaths usually come across as extroverts (even though the claim is you shouldn't try to type sociopaths/psychopaths due to brain damage).
    I come across as an extrovert most of the time. I think many ISTPs may appear to be more relaxed than I am, but rather than study how cars work, I've spent my life studying how people and reality work. And I love talking to people about these topics. And because people's understanding of how they and reality work is often so flawed, I come across as a very animated, passionate and intense extrovert. And then I go home and sleep for ten hours.

    However, I have absolutely no desire to manipulate people. In fact, I go out of my way to not manipulate people, because the feeling of manipulating someone offends me. I don't even like flirting with women to get their number, because I feel no useful information is being conveyed by the flirting, and that by engaging in it I'm competing with other men to see who can come up with the best way of manipulating her into having sex with them, when what I really want is a meaningful relationship. I am also truly egalitarian - I think that every person should be treated literally equally.. I also feel guilt.

    All that said, I am simply not motivated by the same rewards as everyone else. I have, for instance, been completely ineffective in explaining to women that I just want to have a conversation about our life goals and interests, and that I would prefer it if they approached me so that it didn't appear that we were trading sex for money and power. They want me to flirt with them. That's what they want. And they do not appreciate it if I say "why are you doing what you're doing?" They don't want to think about it that deeply. If I do flirt with a woman, it's fun, but I wonder if it's just superficial. Often times it is. Indeed, I find that most of the rewards that people are motivated by are very, very superficial, and I want no part in it.

    I guess this overall does sound more sociopathic than psychopathic. Perhaps ESTP is the psychopathic type.

  9. #9
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    I don't see how any of the offered traits would be useful. Psychopathy is incapacity to find value in other people, paired with an openness to wield aggression, while pursuing (sometimes) malignant ambition. This is the exact opposite of what social evolution has taught us to culturally value. As such, the blunt interpersonal traits commonly associated with psychopathy leave the individual alone and at a loss for how to relate.

    Sure, a lack of guilt and the ability to project a veneer of intimidating self-confidence would seem nice, but would you honestly prefer it instead of emotional connection/depth in human relationships and a subsequent lifestyle of bitterness and frustration at never being able to quite fit in unless you put on an act?

    Tongue-in-cheek articles like the OP only focus on the sexy traits of the disorder. The article doesn't even cite actual psychopaths in their examples - probably out of sensitivity and decorum (ironic) ...but please. Let's be clear here.

    Why not talk about the horrible side of the disorder and the unimaginable pain the very worst examples of psychopaths have produced. Can the special forces crap; tell me about the many lives Ted Bundy forever disfigured. Sure, for every nightmare, there are 1,000 who exist in peace. But why mince words when discussing the disorder - why not pursue a balanced approach? Seems more like a platform than an examination.

    It's what happens when pop culture/cinema interpose cliché over real-world disorder. Pulpy, one-sided fanboy gibberish.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    Sure, a lack of guilt and the ability to project a veneer of intimidating self-confidence would seem nice, but would you honestly prefer it instead of emotional connection/depth in human relationships and a subsequent lifestyle of bitterness and frustration at never being able to quite fit in unless you put on an act?
    I believe I project a veneer of intimidating self-confidence, but I do feel guilt. Or at least I can choose to feel guilty.

    I disagree that emotional connection and depth are equivalent. Emotional connection can be very, very superficial. I would prefer that we rationally agree to have an emotional connection, and then we have one. Then I would agree that it's deep.

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