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  1. #11
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    You taking ownership of the term suggests you've been clinically diagnosed with the disorder?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    You taking ownership of the term suggests you've been clinically diagnosed with the disorder?
    Uhh, no. I know where Google is. If I need a diagnosis i'll do it myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    if you feel like you are losing control.
    Where did losing control come into play? We have not discussed whether a murderous psychopath is in control or out of control. We would like to think that they are out of control because we find their behavior abhorrent, but in fact they are probably using the exact same neural mechanisms to carry out their plan that we are using to label them as "out of control." The problem is not control per se. The problem is that they don't care about the things we care about. Their objective function is completely different.

    Now, speaking as someone who has a different objective function, I can empathize with the *-path to a limited extent.

  3. #13
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Gotcha. I would point you to my above post; I am going to delete it in about 10 mins. I don't like the idea of sharing that part of my backstory, but please look it over in the interim. I hope it helps on some small level.

  4. #14
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    Detachment can be positive in dealing with problems rationally or having an independent mindset.

  5. #15
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    The traits do exist on a sliding scale.

  6. #16
    morose bourgeoisie
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    Quote Originally Posted by funtensity View Post
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...176019901.html
    Psychopath, AKA, ISTP.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    "the Oxford research psychologist argues that psychopathic personality traits—charm, confidence, ruthlessness, coolness under pressure—can, in the right doses, be a good thing. Not all psychopaths are violent, he says, and some of them are just the sort of people society can count on in a crisis."


    Trouble is that almost all psychopaths are by definition, not someone you 'can count on in a crisis'. Maybe one could depend on one, if they were assured of deriving some personal benefit.
    I really don't know what the utility is of taking certain traits out of context and trying to rehabilitate the image of psychopathy. Sure, one can possibly learn something from somone who is 'cool under pressure', but most of the traits, as defined by this condition, have no utility outside of the brain of the psychopath.
    So I really don't get what this book is all about.

  7. #17
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    I don't get what someone who thinks the MBTI is BS is doing in the MBTI forums.

    Moving on, when you put certain high functioning members of society in a brain scanner, their scans look just like psychopaths and criminals. So something is going on here. We can't explain this away so easily as saying "it's a sliding scale." We really don't understand what's going on yet..

  8. #18
    morose bourgeoisie
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    Quote Originally Posted by funtensity View Post
    I don't get what someone who thinks the MBTI is BS is doing in the MBTI forums.

    Moving on, when you put certain high functioning members of society in a brain scanner, their scans look just like psychopaths and criminals. So something is going on here. We can't explain this away so easily as saying "it's a sliding scale." We really don't understand what's going on yet..
    Yeah, what's wrong with those people?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    I don't see how any of the offered traits would be useful. Psychopathy is incapacity to find value in other people, paired with an openness to wield aggression, while pursuing (sometimes) malignant ambition. This is the exact opposite of what social evolution has taught us to culturally value. As such, the blunt interpersonal traits commonly associated with psychopathy leave the individual alone and at a loss for how to relate.

    Sure, a lack of guilt and the ability to project a veneer of intimidating self-confidence would seem nice, but would you honestly prefer it instead of emotional connection/depth in human relationships and a subsequent lifestyle of bitterness and frustration at never being able to quite fit in unless you put on an act?

    Tongue-in-cheek articles like the OP only focus on the sexy traits of the disorder. The article doesn't even cite actual psychopaths in their examples - probably out of sensitivity and decorum (ironic) ...but please. Let's be clear here.

    Why not talk about the horrible side of the disorder and the unimaginable pain the very worst examples of psychopaths have produced. Can the special forces crap; tell me about the many lives Ted Bundy forever disfigured. Sure, for every nightmare, there are 1,000 who exist in peace. But why mince words when discussing the disorder - why not pursue a balanced approach? Seems more like a platform than an examination.

    It's what happens when pop culture/cinema interpose cliché over real-world disorder. Pulpy, one-sided fanboy gibberish.
    New research indicates that psychopaths can "switch" empathy on, if prompted - whereas the neurotypical has to switch it off.

    Even still, in Lark's absence, I'm going to have to echo one of his earlier posts about how a current more is to celebrate psychopathic traits. Modern notions of success, as they become pressured by increases in competition, value cut-throat, self-serving techniques over more intrinsically rewarding techniques. The rate of this process seems exponential. Perhaps psychopathic values instilled in neurotypicals are even more dangerous than psychopaths.

    Romanticized portrayals of psychopaths, such as Dexter, really aren't as romantic as people would like to believe.

    Just thoughts.

  10. #20
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    We need the hard rough men patrolling our borders so we can sleep safe and sound in our beds at night.

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