User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    263

    Default interactionstyles.com

    Today, I borrowed this leaflet "Introduction to interaction styles", by Linda Berens. I found it interesting because she has divided the 16 MBTI types into 4 interaction styles (Behind-the-Scenes, Get-Things-Going, Chart-the-Course, In-Charge) based on 3 axis.

    First axis is our "Communication Style": Directing versus Informing (ways we influence others).
    Second axis is our "Roles": Initiating versus Responding (ways to define relationships).
    Third axis is our "Attention": Control versus Movement (focus and interest).

    Description of the 3 Axis

    Communication Style - Directing versus Informing
    Directing
    Focus on: Task, time.
    Intent: Give structure, direct.
    Behaviour: Tell, ask, urge. Non-verbally moving forward, define.
    Comfort Zone: Comfortable telling people what to do - less comfortable giving information and leaving alone.
    Examples: Ask Bob for specific instructions on preparing the report. Ellen, would you call some hotels about dates in August for fifty people for a two-day seminar?
    Tendencies: Impatient with emergent process. Often surprised when people resist being told what to do. May be frustrated by lack of clear position.
    Tend to act certain that they are right. May be seen as bossy.

    Informing
    Focus on: Process, motivation.
    Intent: Evoke, draw forth, inspire, seek input.
    Behaviour: Inform, inquire, explain, describe. Non-verbally flowing, open, eliciting.
    Comfort zone: Comfortable giving information only. Less comfortable telling people what to do.
    Examples: Bob has some information that might help you with the report. Ellen, do we have information on conference sites for a two-day seminar in August for fifty people?
    Tendencies: More patient with emergent processes. Often surprised when information is not acted on. May be offended at being told what to do.
    More likely to seem non-commital. May be seen as indecisive.

    Roles - Initiating versus Responding
    Initiating
    Focus on: External world.
    Intent: Reach out, interact.
    Behaviour: Initiated interactions. Fast pace, active. Extraverting and gregarious.
    Comfort zone: Comfortable making the first move in new relationships. Less comfortable with silence.
    Examples: Think out loud. Jump right in with comments. Tend to speak and act, then reflect. Easier to get to know.
    Tendencies: Inpatient with slow pace. Often surprised when people don't want to talk. May be frustrated by lack of feed back and interaction. May be seen as intrusive.

    Responding
    Focus on: Internal world.
    Intent: Reach in, reflect.
    Behaviour: Responds and reflects. Slow pace, patient. Introverting and solitary.
    Comfort zone: Less comfortable initiating new relationships. Comfortable with silence.
    Examples: Think before commenting. Tend to reflect or try out something, then speak and act. Harder to get to know.
    Tendencies: Pressured by fast pace. Often surprised when people think they are angry. May be frustrated by lack of reflection time. May be seen as withholding.

    Attention - Control versus Movement
    Control
    Focus on: Control over the outcome.
    Intent: To get a desired result.
    Behaviour: Control information flow. Check against the desired outcome. Ensure the result is acheived.
    Comfort zone: When they have a measure of control and say so over the outcome.
    Examples: I wish they would just listen to me. We need to hold off on that project until we work through the bugs. Let's get it done now!
    Tendencies: To get too focused on the outcome and be stubborn about the control.

    Movement
    Focus on: Movement toward the goal.
    Intent: To see progress and action toward the goal.
    Behaviour: Create milestones or benchmarks. Check in with the group for progress. Motivate and forge ahead.
    Comfort zone: When they are given the project and told to go ahead with it and then things start moving along.
    Examples: I wish she'd just let me go ahead with it. Good, we're making progress. Trust the process.
    Tendencies: To get too focused on moving forward and rush to act without considering the result.[/SPOILER]

    The MBTI types are divided into the 4 interaction styles like this:
    Behind-the-Scenes = INFP, ISFJ, INTP, ISFP
    Get-Things-Going = ENFP, ESFJ, ENTP, ESFP
    Chart-the-Course = INFJ, ISTJ, INTJ, ISTP
    In-Charge = ENFJ, ESTJ, ENTJ, ESTP

    Description of the 4 Interaction Types
    Behind-the-Scenes: INFP, ISFJ, INTP, ISFP
    Communication (Ways we Influence Others): Informing
    Roles: Responding
    Attention, focus, interest: Control.


    The theme is getting the best result possible. People of this style focus on understanding and working with the process to create a positive outcome. They see value in many contributions and consult outside inputs to make an informed decision. They aim to integrate various information sources and accommodate differing points of view. They approach others with a quiet, calm style that may not show their strong convictions. Producing, sustaining, defining, and clarifying are all ways they support a group's process. They typically have more patience than most with the time it takes to gain support through consensus for a project or to refine the result.

    Keywords:
    - Do what it takes to get the best result possible.
    - See value in contributions from many people or information sources.
    - Support the group's process by allowing for digressions then refocisung on the desired outcome.
    - Reconcile many voices in communication of the vision.
    - Make consultative decisions, integrating many sources of input.
    - Focus on understanding the process to get a high quality outcome.
    - Aim to produce the best products and results.
    - Support others as they do their work.
    - Define specifications to meet standarts and apply principles.
    - Clarify values and intentions.

    Get-Things-Going: ENFP, ESFJ, ENTP, ESFP
    Communication (Ways we Influence Others): Informing
    Roles: Initiating.
    Attention, focus, interest: Movement.


    The theme is persuading and involving others. They thrive in facilitator or catalyst roles and aim to inspire others to move to action, facilitating the process. Their focus is on interaction, often with an expressive style. They Get-Things-Going? with upbeat energy, enthusiasm, or excitement, which can be contagious. Exploring options and possibilities, making preparations, discovering new ideas, and sharing insights are all ways they get people moving along. They want decisions to be participative and enthusiastic, with everyone involved and engaged.

    Keywords:
    - Get everyone involved participating.
    - Move the group to action along their paths.
    - Facilitate the group's process to work with people where they are to get them to where they are going.
    - Get the energy moving toward an emerging vision.
    - Make enthusiastic, collaborative decisions that ensure buy-in.
    - Focus on interactions to get more from the group than group members can get induvidually.
    - Explore options that keep things moving along.
    - Make preparations to make things easy for others.
    - Discover new ways of seeing things and doing things.
    - Share insights about what something means and what is really going on.


    Chart-the-Course: INFJ, ISTJ, INTJ, ISTP
    Communication (Ways we Influence Others): Directing.
    Roles: Responding
    Attention, focus, interest: Movement.


    The theme is having a course of action to follow. People of this style focus on knowing what to do and keeping themselves, the group, or the project on track. They prefer to enter a situation having an idea of what is to happen. They identify a process to accomplish a goal and have a somewhat contained tension as they work to create and monitor a plan. The aim is not the plan itself, but to use it as a guide to move things along toward the goal. Their informed and deliberate decisions are based on analyzing, outlining, conceptualizing or foreseeing what needs to be done.

    Keywords:
    - Have a course of action in mind beforehand.
    - Create a plan (or severel workable plans).
    - Keep the ground on track, allowing for digressions as long as progress is being made.
    - Devise, define, describe, or reveal the way to acheive the vision.
    - Make deliberate decisions, checking against an already- thought- out process.
    - Focus on giving guidance and illumination so the right decision is made.
    - Analyze and figure out what needs to be done.
    - Plan agendas for project completion and meetings.
    - Conceptialize a desired result and how to get there.
    - Foresee how people will respond and plan accordingly.

    In-Charge: ENFJ, ESTJ, ENTJ, ESTP
    Communication (Ways we Influence Others): Directing
    Roles: Initiating
    Attention, focus, interest: Control.


    The theme is getting things accomplished through people. People of this style are focused on results, often taking action quickly. They often have a driving energy with an intention to lead a group to the goal. They make decisions quickly to keep themselves and others on task, on target, and on time. They hate wasting time and having to back track. Mentoring, executing actions, supervising, and mobilizing resources are all ways they get things accomplished. They notice right away what is not working in a situation and become painfully aware of what needs to be fixed, healed, or corrected.

    Keywords:
    - Get things accomplished (often through people).
    - Take rapid action to get things done and move on to the next project.
    - Lead the group to the goal.
    - Articulate the vision and create an environment to acheive it.
    - Make quick decisions with confidence in what is needed.
    - Focus on getting desired results as soon as possible.
    - Execute actions, work all the angles, and remove obstacles.
    - Supervise others and provide resources.
    - Marshal and mibolize the people, and financial and material resources.
    - Mentor people, finding talent and burturing the talent to get the job done.
    Verbal IQ Test

    SubFacor IQ score = 65
    Subscale percentile = 1

    You appear to have a very limited vocabulary and lack the ability to identify the correct responses for a variety of different questions. A deficient vocabulary can hinder you in many ways; you may struggle to find the correct words when speaking, fail to understand what others are communicating to you, or come across as inarticulate to others.

  2. #2
    The Destroyer Colors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    5x/o
    Posts
    1,271

    Default

    I've seen a lot of members talk about this before, but this is the first full summary of the system I've read. Does she explain why the 4 groups instead of 8? Wouldn't some people fall out of the groups then?

    In what arenas do we define the axis(es?)? Are we talking about it a group project sort of environment?

    Personally, I think I'm Informing-Initiating-Control (in goal-oriented activity)... which is completely different from Chart-the-Course (the group for ISTP).

    For those who're familiar with the system, how does it work for you (does it gel in real life)?

  3. #3
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    7
    Posts
    752

    Default

    Linda developed this as an "answer" to the DISC system for companies that want a quick workshop. So it's 4 groups for quick understanding. I've been part of a couple short presentations she's done for type trainers and the attendees seem to agree with the descriptions.

    Chart the course is right on for me. I'm part of a leadership team and everyone on it takes the roles the interaction styles define.
    edcoaching

  4. #4
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    548 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    3,440

    Default

    Interaction Styles is just basically another version of temperament. And they actually match the ancient temperaments a little bit better than the Keirseyan (or "conative" as she calls it) model.
    Keirsey did have eight variants using "role-directive" and "role-informative". What Berens did is divide those by E and I. This matches the ancient temperaments, which were traditionally measured as introvert or extrovert, and some form of people vs task focus. DiSC, Social Styles and others were basically the ancient temperaments renamed.

    The rift between the two models essentially began at Kant, who introduced perception into temperament. From there, Kretschmer expands upon this, and Keirsey adopts Kretschmer's system which is what he easily mapped to MBTI, which featured its perceptive (S/N) as well as judgment functions. But then the perception-based temperaments were different rom the old behavioral ones. What happens is that the two different models are covering two different areas of personality: social skills (interaction) and action (conation). And the perception scale basically twists the old people vs task scale, so that directing/informing do not map onto any one MBTI factor. So it looks as if Keirsey or Berens just made it up (as some critics of the two in MBTI circles will argue). But it really is apart of the old model, and fits awkwardly because of the different frameworks involved. So for Sensors, D/Inf is T/F; while for iNtuitors, it is J/P.
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    I'm probably about 80% "get things going", and 20% "in charge". The other two styles would bore the crap out of me.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #6
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Thank you for posting this.

    Why are there no types that are informing-initiating-controlling? *thinks* Shouldn't there be 8 groups? 2^3

    I see myself as mostly informing, about midway on initiating/responding (depends on the circumstances), and mostly controlling.

  7. #7
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    4 so/sp
    Posts
    6,931

    Default

    After reading the descriptions, I relate most to Informing, Responding, and a combo of Control and Movement (can't decide which one fits best). This lines me up most with Behind the Scenes.

    [Interaction styles is one of the main things about myself that doesn't line up with INFJ.]
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

    My Photography and Watercolor Fine Art Prints!!! Cascade Colors Fine Art Prints
    https://docs.google.com/uc?export=do...Gd5N3NZZE52QjQ

  8. #8
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    548 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    3,440

    Default

    Control and Movement are cross-factors pairing opposites. They are a result of basically, "double-mirror image" symmetry. So you can't make it an additional factor to mix with the others. It is a byproduct of the other two factors.

    In studying E/I and D/Inf (people/task) matrices (especially the FIRO-based one that deals in terms of "express" and "want"), what I find is that both E/Informing and I/Directing both express what they want, and want what they express. The Get Things Going wants interaction, and thus expresses (initiates) to people, to meet that need. The Chart the Course is task-oriented, and thus does not express to people as much, in order to meet their need. In either case, people or tasks are the "goals", and both styles move toward the goal in their own ways. On the other hand; E/Directing and I/Informing are very "indirect" in that respect. An In Charge is expressive or initiating, yet task-focused rather than people focused. Why do they express to people then? To control, in order to meet whatever their goal is. But what about the opposite Behind the Scenes? Because they are more reserved, but still want interaction from people, they basically have to also control, to gain the interaction, but this will be in an opposite fashion from the In Charge. And this will be in their calm, friendly approach.

    Now all of this is dealing with basic social skills, while Berens' focuses more on "goals and outcomes" in team-type settings. Yet I have seen a parallel between this and the "direct/indirect" social behavior I am describing. BtS, according to Berens, will "seek inputs and outputs to get the best result possible", and "hold back" until the result is right or enough input is had. The seeking of input is what they use with others since they are not as expressive upfront. GtG on the other hand is expressive, and aims for the quickest start and checks with people along the way. CtC is also less expressive, and focuses more on planning. They are focused on the task, and do not seek input from others as much.

    So if you're Informing and Initiating, then we would expect that you express this to others to attain the goal, and you're Movement-focused. If you were Control focused, then you would either be task-oriented, and focused purely on the outcome and the resources, but then you would tend to be directing. Either that, or you would only need to control because of a lack of initiating, and being responding instead. The term "control" used in this sense can be confusing. If you're GtG, then you might think you're "controlling" because of the expressiveness, but according this this definition, the means used to reach the goal is called "movement".
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    401

    Default

    I relate to Chart the Course and then I flip to In Charge when I am put in a leadership position. My mother (ESTP) has a definite In Charge style and perhaps I've learned that style from her.

    I used to have a lot of frustration with the Behind the Scenes style, but living with an ISFJ has taught me some sort of patience with it...

Similar Threads

  1. Colour Test Colour Quiz (via colorquiz.com)
    By targobelle in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 135
    Last Post: 02-19-2015, 10:43 PM
  2. Bastardized version of PersonalityPage.com
    By RDF in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-29-2012, 06:41 PM
  3. FamousType.com?
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-14-2009, 12:25 PM
  4. Cool tests at tickle.com
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-09-2008, 11:40 PM
  5. Savetoby.com
    By chippinchunk in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-26-2007, 08:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO