User Tag List

View Poll Results: Which cognitive function do you associate the most with narcissism?

Voters
15. You may not vote on this poll
  • Se

    3 20.00%
  • Si

    0 0%
  • Ne

    3 20.00%
  • Ni

    1 6.67%
  • Te

    1 6.67%
  • Ti

    3 20.00%
  • Fe

    2 13.33%
  • Fi

    2 13.33%
123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 55

  1. #1
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    PORG
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII None
    Posts
    9,059

    Default Cognitive functions and narcissism

    I have my own ideas, of course. However, I have observed that my answer to this question happens to be a cognitive function I don't use very much. This seems too convenient. I want to know other people's thoughts on this.

    (Private poll, by the way.)
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


    This is not going to go the way you think....

    Visit my Johari:
    http://kevan.org/johari?name=Birddude78

  2. #2
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    I have strictly no idea. There are plenty of Narcissists out there, but they can be of any kind since it is supposed to be an unhealthy behaviour.

    Nonetheless, I'd be tempted to say it's Fe. But the paradox is that the way I use my own Fe is the opposite of Narcissism: it helps me to ponder things, to look more reasonable and more genuinely inclined to help and listen even in front of my usual audience.

    So maybe it's related to an unhealthy use of Fe.
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

    7w8 SCUxI

  3. #3
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    PORG
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII None
    Posts
    9,059

    Default

    I wouldn't go for Fe, actually. The only reason I haven't voted yet is that I don't want to influence the results.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


    This is not going to go the way you think....

    Visit my Johari:
    http://kevan.org/johari?name=Birddude78

  4. #4
    Member Asterism's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    MBTI
    IxxJ
    Enneagram
    4w5 sx/sp
    Posts
    33

    Default

    I'd also agree with unhealthy Fe exemplifying some of the more malignant narcissistic traits.

    Generalized but intense self-absorption, meanwhile, defies type.

  5. #5
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    451 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INFp Ni
    Posts
    1,373

    Default

    I want to say that Ti would be high up on the list, but what I'm thinking of is probably really Ti getting broadcasted by Fe ("Society is deluded, I'm one of the few rational people, etc. etc."). I know, for my part, I'm a very narcissistic person, so it would probably be one of my own main functions. I have a tendency to convince myself that I'm very good-looking, until I glance in the mirror or think about a time when I've glanced in the mirror. That would be weak Se and Si, I'd say, and probably . . . strong Fe, since what I'm focused on, when I have this narcissistic delusion, is a sense of how my looks are (not really) being received by others.

    Really, I can't imagine Fe not being involved in narcissism. Narcissism always entails viewing yourself from an outside, basically social perspective, and often takes on a very demonstrative aspect. It is unclear to me what means Fi would have of bending back on itself in such a way that narcissism would become possible for it; Fi tends to internalize the self rather than externalize it, and that leaves narcissism with no means of propping itself up. Since narcissism is basically personal in nature, I don't believe any of the other functions could be involved in it, except in a very non-fundamental way.
    [ Ni > Ti > Fe > Fi > Ne > Te > Si > Se ][ 4w5 sp/sx ][ RLOAI ][ IEI-Ni ]

  6. #6
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    7,823

    Default



    negative values on the number means E, S, T and J, *= some correlation, **= strong correlation. but do keep in mind that its about narcissistic personality disorder. anyways correlations show some correlation to N, pretty even on E/I and small but not statistically significant on T and J.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

  7. #7
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    451 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INFp Ni
    Posts
    1,373

    Default

    A large chunk of the people who participated in that study were probably mistyped, so I wouldn't place too much stock in the correlations.
    [ Ni > Ti > Fe > Fi > Ne > Te > Si > Se ][ 4w5 sp/sx ][ RLOAI ][ IEI-Ni ]

  8. #8
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,675

    Default

    Feeling can be a part of it perhaps, I know that most of what I've read about narcissism describes the individuals exhibiting it as being highly "deployed" in terms of aggressive or other traits as a cover for the fact that they're totally weak and have awful self-esteem and have to create and maintain a facade through manipulation so that no one else and they themselves will never be forced to face the reality.

    Feeling, thinking and other traits are involved in that, Karen Horney's idea about the true and false self and the conflict between them makes more sense as an explanation, the false self could be a mistype which they strongly desire or identify with and the true self could be the true type which they have disowned.

    The false self in Horney's theory is an outgrowth of neurotic trends, moving towards, moving away, moving against others, which are caused by basic anxiety in the family home, doubts and insecurity which seem to be qualitatively similar to Bowlby's theories about attachment styles and disordered attachment.

    I've not read much about how Jung considered the shadow to develop and the role it could play but its similar in so far as it is a disowned self and behaviour set, if that's the case it could be typified as the disowned traits.

  9. #9
    Society
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    Nonetheless, I'd be tempted to say it's Fe.
    Quote Originally Posted by Asterism View Post
    I'd also agree with unhealthy Fe exemplifying some of the more malignant narcissistic traits.
    in my experience and observations i'd agree with this.
    - it could just be that Fe is a lot more prone towards the self esteem problems that cause NPD.

  10. #10
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    7,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polaris View Post
    A large chunk of the people who participated in that study were probably mistyped, so I wouldn't place too much stock in the correlations.
    i bet your opinion is based on people getting wrong types often with some crappy free internet tests..
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

Similar Threads

  1. Cognitive functions and TV.
    By kbxcomix in forum Popular Culture and Type
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-20-2012, 02:55 PM
  2. Replies: 38
    Last Post: 12-01-2011, 10:13 AM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-08-2011, 10:05 AM
  4. Cognitive functions and problem solving
    By onemoretime in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-19-2011, 06:49 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO