User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    23

    Default Is it possible to like Meyers-Briggs without really believing in cognitive functions?

    I’ve been learning about the Meyers-Briggs types lately, and I like them – I find personality typologies interesting, and in the cases I’ve seen of someone taking a test, the description always seems quite accurate. The thing is, the whole cognitive functions part doesn’t make that much sense to me.
    For one thing, having functions determined by J vs. P seems strange. The way I understand it, the J and P choice seeks to measure whether someone’s main way of dealing with the world is decision-making or information gathering, which decides what their dominant function will be. However, in a Meyers-Briggs test, the J/P result is based on questions about a specific aspect or personality: whether someone prefers to plan ahead and stick to a decided routine, or whether they prefer to decide things as they go and explore different options more. This makes sense to me as a distinction in someone’s personality, like "conscientiousness", and I do fit P in that respect. However, I don’t think that aspect of personality determines what the main part of someone’s personality is in terms of sensing/intuition or thinking/feeling. I don’t think there’s always a link between these two ideas that J/P is supposed to express. For example, I’m more introverted and I’d rather keep my options open, but does that really mean I necessarily use “feeling” more than “intuition”? I don’t think there’s always a link.
    For another thing, half of the types, mine included, are supposed to have Thinking or Feeling as their dominant function, and the other one as the weak inferior function. I don’t think many people are like that – it sounds like Spock and McCoy from Star Trek. Most people use logic frequently in some situations and emotion frequently in others, and while I know people usually lean one way or another, I don’t think it’s so black and white as “dominant function vs. inferior function” for half of people. I think F is right for me since I consider emotions and sympathy when making decisions, but I think logically a lot of the time and can be very detached and analytical. It seems wrong to say thinking is my “inferior” function.
    Honestly, it just doesn’t seem right to me to think that people’s minds work in such a specific, limited way of only four possible processes, and I’m no expert, but I don’t think there’s much psychological evidence for it. If someone wants to explain the functions in a way that would make me see them as more valid, you can, but that’s not necessarily what I’m looking for. I’m just wondering if anyone else likes the Meyers-Briggs typology without necessarily believing that people’s minds are ruled by those cognitive functions.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    192

    Default

    I'm open-minded about the existence of The Functions. You're completely right about there being no real evidence out there for physical differences between the brains of each type, or how those types use their brains. However, there is a fairly good understanding of how Extraversion/Introversion works, so maybe the other things are there too we just don't know how to find them yet? The weirdest thing about this kind of typology is that it actually seems to work - people do tend to fit into these types (though not all) - so there might be something to it. But, if it all turned out to be complete nonsense, I wouldn't be too surprised haha. The "Big Five" is a more scientific typing system, but it seems less interesting because it's just a list of traits.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    Will
    Posts
    5,927

    Default

    Cognitive functions are indeed real and have been observed by neuroscience, but I would agree that people nonetheless push them too far and invent oftentimes false explanations, using convoluted functional arguments to justify a possibly flawed typing decision. I believe that we should go from behaviors to functions, and not vice-versa. If you act one way or think one way, your functions will reflect that. I know this from experience, as people have given me typing suggestions flying around everywhere and with little logical consistency, all revolving around these functional perceptions.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    192

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Poimandres View Post
    Cognitive functions are indeed real and have been observed by neuroscience,
    Where do you get this information from? Seeing which parts of the brain different things happen (like emotions, creativity, etc) in is not the same as confirming the existence of MBTI's cognitive functions.

  5. #5
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/so
    Posts
    1,565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by En Gallop View Post
    Where do you get this information from? Seeing which parts of the brain different things happen (like emotions, creativity, etc) in is not the same as confirming the existence of MBTI's cognitive functions.
    I believe this is a reference to Nardi's Neuroscience of Personality. Nardi's book doesn't count as peer reviewed or replicated work, but is intringing.

    For non-cognitive-functions-based approaches, there are multiple options. One is the Big Five (which isn't the MBTI, but does correlate a fair degree). For an adaptation of the MBTI towards a non-cognitive-function approach, Wilde has an interesting approach, drawing on the work of Reynierse (which is also worth a ponder).

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    192

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    I believe this is a reference to Nardi's Neuroscience of Personality. Nardi's book doesn't count as peer reviewed or replicated work, but is intringing.

    For non-cognitive-functions-based approaches, there are multiple options. One is the Big Five (which isn't the MBTI, but does correlate a fair degree). For an adaptation of the MBTI towards a non-cognitive-function approach, Wilde has an interesting approach, drawing on the work of Reynierse (which is also worth a ponder).
    I've heard of Nardi's work. I like the fact he actually tried to look for the cognitive functions. But the main problem I have with it is that he already knew everyone's personality types beforehand, right? So how do we know those people aren't trying to appear more like their types?

    It would be much better (and more difficult lol) to try to figure out people's personality types who have never actually heard of the theory - especially by watching how people's brains act in real-life situations, rather than very-focused controlled "experiments" in a room.

  7. #7
    Gone Aesthete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    1w2 sp/sx
    Posts
    385

    Default

    @GranChi

    I see you're new to this. As a starter, this might shed more light on what it's all about: http://www.cognitiveprocesses.com/

    Thinking doesn't mean you're an emotionless robot, nor does feeling mean you're illogical. Heck, some perceivers are even more action-oriented than some judgers. It's all about the eight functions.
    Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.

    Schopenhauer

Similar Threads

  1. [ENFJ] Is it possible (or likely) to be an ENFJ and enneagram type 7?
    By pinkgraffiti in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-21-2013, 10:22 PM
  2. is it possible to get morning sickness without being pregnant?
    By prplchknz in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 07-25-2013, 04:56 PM
  3. Is it possible to see spirituality without believeing in spirits...?
    By Clover in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-27-2009, 01:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO