User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 43

  1. #21
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    XXFP
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Depends on what you mean by "bad driver" ...I think I may be a stereotypical SP in that my driving skills are excellent but as a younger person I drove too fast. My reflexes are incredible, I once was doing 100 on the Triangle Beltline in NC and did a 360 in the middle of the freeway and kept such a firm grip on my car that I just turned forward and drove away without a scratch.

    I've also flipped a car into a ditch and back on to its tires on a back country road at night, and kept driving to my friends' house.

    Kids, don't try this at home. I have no idea how I'm alive.
    I like you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    If I'm honest about my personality in my teens and early twenties, I see pretty clearly an SP who could barely to stand to go to her classes in high school and avoided college until her mid-twenties, who flew by the seat of her pants and is probably alive due to animal reflexes and sheer dumb luck.
    This doesn't sound like anyone I know at all.



    ---

    I drove probably 9000 miles last year? Maybe more.

    I consider myself an above average driver - while I do consider navigation to be an important skill, I think the most important skills in determining what is a good driver are:

    - accident avoidance - safety first

    based in:

    - situational awareness
    - communication and anticipation
    - maneuvering skills

    I'm constantly refining my driving techniques. After watching a series of crash videos on youtube, I've realized that knowing the lay of the land is critical when something goes wrong - you need to know what's up. Whenever I'm on the highway I try to practice reading the terrain, and I've developed my own nomenclature to describe my environment.

    For instance:

    "Center 3, to 4 with a merge clear, Jersey and open, pulling two left, Acura on the right crunch, anchor ahead far, with a clear horizon" would indicate:

    - I'm in the center lane on 3 lane road.
    - 1 lane is merging in, but no cars are coming in
    - (read left to right), there is a Jersey (hard concrete wall) on the left shoulder and open grass or similar on the right
    - In the left lane there are two cars behind me which are coming to pass (moving faster than I am)
    - In the right lane there is an Acura aligned with my fender. A passing car will go from pulling, crunching, to pushing, from my perspective.
    - anchor means a car (or truck) with a constant rate of speed, probably slower than me, in my lane, far varies but usually more than 10 seconds.
    - clear horizon means low traffic, a bumpy horizon is a lot of traffic. similar wording for "rearview" - ie. "bumpy rear."

    By doing this scanning constantly, I'm able to train myself to assess what's going on around me quickly because I'm learning to fill in the information in a standardized fashion, eventually possibly even unconsciously.

    Also, by making up this nomenclature I've started to assess specific situations more closely, creating sets of sub-routines for merging, having cars merge in, predicting behavior, changing lanes, etc.

    All said and done, I still like to screw around.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    IxTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ti
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chana View Post
    i'm 22 and have never had a driver's license so i'm going to go with INFP . i'm just kinda terrified of it and luckily i live somewhere with good public transportation.

    i actually know a few INFPs who got their license well into their 20's.
    Question: which types are most likely to be suckiest at driving?

    I'm going with ESTP and ESFP, if those types are prone to having ADHD. But I don't see this as being a type-related issue.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  3. #23
    philosopher wood nymph greenfairy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    MBTI
    iNfj
    Enneagram
    6w5 sx/sp
    Posts
    4,042

    Default

    I don't think it's type related either. I sometimes don't pay attention, but it has only resulted in minor things like rear ending someone at a red light. My INFP cousin is kind of a bad driver. She's the only one I know who I would classify as such. And she gets lost all the time. Someone gave her a GPS and she didn't even install it in her car.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    MBTI
    IxTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ti
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    There's really no study to go by, just personal experience. I've ridden with two ISFPs that I know of. The first one was weaving in and out of lanes on a busy one-way 2-laner. Of course he was probably in his late teens. Last year, I asked him if he still drives that way, and he said he doesn't. I think he's in his 60s now.

    Weirdest and possibly scariest driving I've ever dealt with: This INFJ (?) - a very good pianist and actress, albeit with real suicidal tendencies - didn't seem to be focusing on the road at all. At a stop light, she would typically wait for the person behind her to honk before she proceeded. Same with switching lanes. She didn't check. She only knows when she's about to collide with someone when they honk at her.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  5. #25
    Senior Member KatharineML's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    MBTI
    ?
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sp
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
    I think that Ti-Se is a good combination for intuitive physics in real-time. As a Ni-dom I am not a good driver when distracted in abstract space. When I am present in the moment, though, I am pretty good at this type of thing and can interact with the traffic flow in a logical manner.

    Inferior Te-Si would probably have the most trouble because they would have an internalized idea of how traffic is supposed to be, and might be more likely to impose that idea on it rather than just reacting to what is actually there. I think this is the ENFP.

    Also, this post is mostly jabbering and I'm not that invested in these conclusions. It's just an idea.
    I like your thinking! Could it be that Te Si is a bad combination in general? And thus that Ti Se is the best? This would mean that ESTJ, ISTJ, ENFP and INFP would be the worst drivers - as in, they don't respond to what's actually there, but to preconcieved ideas of what is there. This would fit with most people's comments.

    Some people have said that NJ's are bad drivers but this only seems to be when they are introverting. Otherwise, they are quite good drivers.

    The best drivers then, by your definition would be ESTP, ISTP, INTJ and INFJ.

    What does Green Fairy, Mal and jontherobot think???

  6. #26
    Doesn't Read Your Posts Haight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTj
    Posts
    6,243

    Default

    I am phenomenal. And I am referring to driving motorized vehicles - I felt the need to clarify in case someone thought I just randomly posted that statement in the first thread I opened.

    I will add, however, that I have driven more miles than most people do in their entire life by the time I was 30. Also, I am a graduate of the Mario Andretti professional driving school. So it's not all natural talent, but I am gifted. Make no mistake about that.

    In sum, an INTP with OCB is going to be the answer to the OP.*


    *Yes, I can also bust a rhyme whenever necessary.
    "The only time I'm wrong is when I'm questioning myself."
    Haight

  7. #27
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEI Ni
    Posts
    7,661

    Default

    SPs I know have the most trouble with the law, but that's because they can be reckless.

    I'm a bad driver because I'm oblivious. However, I don't have have problems stemming from it much, such as tickets or accidents. People do get freaked out when they drive with me. I tend to take turns fast, mess around with stuff in the car & get lost easily.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  8. #28
    Senior Member Winds of Thor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    3w4 sx/so
    Posts
    1,859

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Depends on what you mean by "bad driver" ...I think I may be a stereotypical SP in that my driving skills are excellent but as a younger person I drove too fast. My reflexes are incredible, I once was doing 100 on the Triangle Beltline in NC and did a 360 in the middle of the freeway and kept such a firm grip on my car that I just turned forward and drove away without a scratch.

    I've also flipped a car into a ditch and back on to its tires on a back country road at night, and kept driving to my friends' house.

    Kids, don't try this at home. I have no idea how I'm alive.
    "..And the eight and final rule: If this is your first time at Fight Club, you have to fight."
    'Men are meant to be with women. The rest is perversion and mental illness.'

  9. #29
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KatharineML View Post
    I like your thinking! Could it be that Te Si is a bad combination in general? And thus that Ti Se is the best? This would mean that ESTJ, ISTJ, ENFP and INFP would be the worst drivers - as in, they don't respond to what's actually there, but to preconcieved ideas of what is there. This would fit with most people's comments.

    Some people have said that NJ's are bad drivers but this only seems to be when they are introverting. Otherwise, they are quite good drivers.

    The best drivers then, by your definition would be ESTP, ISTP, INTJ and INFJ.

    What does Green Fairy, Mal and jontherobot think???


    In my opinion, the best drivers in general are the people who are well-educated in how to drive, whether through good instruction or through personal dedication to competency, and who care enough about driving itself to stay engaged in the act of driving and put a maximal effort into each driving performance. That all has little to do with type itself.

    Personally, as an ENFP, I don't know about "preconceived ideas of what is there". I think I tend to view everything more theoretically than most people, but that's generally not a problem when driving. I drive with a perception of the goal as a theoretical game of optimization of speed, comfort, precision, and safety. It's true that focusing on the theoretical ideal path of a curve in reference to a turn, for instance, removes one from concentrating on the more in-touch reality of that individual curve itself, but it also helps create a mental database of curves and approaches that can be tapped again and again in unclear situations, which is a strength when one is suddenly removed from the physical details of the situation (for instance, it's very foggy) or when asked how best to construct a road for drivers. I would say these advantages and disadvantages hold true for any strong N.

    If we're talking the "best driver" in terms of racetrack driving, I'd say that ISTP and ESTP are both types that are likely to excel, given Ti proficiency with internal system mechanics and Se proficiency in immediate sensory intake and response. If we mean the "best driver" in terms of safest on the road, SJs are probably quite good, ESTJ > ISTJ > ISFJ > ESFJ, as Si keeps them grounded in present sensory environment while SJ nature lends itself to prioritizing the practical factors of efficiency (STJ), safety, and staying focused on the goal of driving well. NTs are often competency-focused, so they often tend to pride themselves on their driving competency, though my ENTP cousin is notorious for shitty driving - he gets distracted. NFs, both out of experience and theoretical consideration, would seem to come up last, NFJs > NFPs. (Haha sorry NFPs!) Their thought processes are the least likely to lend themselves to the process of driving and most likely to be distracting, in my opinion.

    Myself, I am a graduate of my INTP dad's rigorous self-instituted school of driving, including many Sunday mornings spent performing figure-8s in parking lots around little orange cones that he would place and answering rapid-fire questions about driving theory, and I pride myself on my driving ability - though I struggle dealing with distraction when there are multiple passengers in my car.

    Ultimately I think it has more to do with how educated you are and how motivated you are to care about your driving than anything to do with type, though there are probably some loose correlations.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Winds of Thor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    3w4 sx/so
    Posts
    1,859

    Default

    I don't know, I tend to believe the best drivers are the ones who practice the most. Generally speaking, and as @skylights suggests.

    I've driven fast quite a lot, drifted through corners half-sideways, donuts, burnouts, threw the car into controlled 180 spins, shifting into reverse and parking between two adjacent cars (I wouldn't suggest trying this one). One time a security guard at a company checked my ID at the gate, stepped back and motioned a request to burn off the tires. I cordially obliged.

    I see driving as skill. Including knowing and exploring the performance envelope of the vehicle. Knowing these limits and having the experience to act with the car in a split second if needed is important. I wouldn't say some of these are 'good' to do if amongst others on the road. Most all were on private property.
    "..And the eight and final rule: If this is your first time at Fight Club, you have to fight."
    'Men are meant to be with women. The rest is perversion and mental illness.'

Similar Threads

  1. Which type is most likely to be a huge troll?
    By Thehyperlexic in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-12-2016, 07:50 AM
  2. Which types are most likely to acquire eating disorders?
    By KiwiBurst in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 07-11-2015, 07:24 PM
  3. [MBTItm] Which types are most likely to nag?
    By Soar337 in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-20-2011, 07:58 PM
  4. [MBTItm] which type is most likely to refuse taking the MBTI test?
    By Drezoryx in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-17-2010, 12:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO