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  1. #1
    Gone Aesthete's Avatar
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    Default Healthy vs Unhealthy

    I've seen the terms "Healthy XXXX" and "Unhealthy XXXX" being used quite a few times. I'm confused as to whether an unhealthy type would show traits characteristic to a type (an "unhealthy ENFJ" acts differently from an "unhealthy INTP") or if these two words are mere adjectives with no direct relation to type.
    Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.

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    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    read the 'form of the inferior' topics somewhere on this section
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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    Gone Aesthete's Avatar
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    Thank you. I've found some stuff and I'll look into it.
    Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.

    Schopenhauer

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    Senior Member PimpinMcBoltage's Avatar
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    It is generally used as an excuse for typism more than anything else (smashing types that the person doesn't like with little repercussions). It can also mean a type is relying too much on the dominant function to deal with the world, and thus eruptions of the inferior function happens due to that perspective being neglected.
    Phelgmatic-Jewish-Communist-Islamic-Transethnic-Asexual-National Socialist

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    Gone Aesthete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PimpinMcBoltage View Post
    It is generally used as an excuse for typism more than anything else (smashing types that the person doesn't like with little repercussions).
    Haha! I've noticed this.

    It can also mean a type is relying too much on the dominant function to deal with the world, and thus eruptions of the inferior function happens due to that perspective being neglected.
    Yes, that's what it actually is from what I've just read.
    Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.

    Schopenhauer

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    Gone Aesthete's Avatar
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    Is the plunging into unhealthiness a common occurrence within the process of individuation? It seems to come about when the weaker functions are becoming more and more conscious.

    I would be lying to say I don't see myself in some of these lately.
    Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.

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    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aesthete View Post
    Is the plunging into unhealthiness a common occurrence within the process of individuation? It seems to come about when the weaker functions are becoming more and more conscious.

    I would be lying to say I don't see myself in some of these lately.
    The activity of consciousness is selective. Selection demands direction. But direction requires the exclusion of everything irrelevant. This is bound to make the conscious orientation one-sided. The contents that are excluded and inhibited by the chosen direction sink into the unconscious, where they form a counterweight to the conscious orientation. The strengthening of this counterposition keeps pace with the increase of conscious one-sidedness until finally . . . . the repressed unconscious contents break through in the form of dreams and spontaneous images. . . . As a rule, the unconscious compensation does not run counter to consciousness, but is rather a balancing or supplementing of the conscious orientation. In dreams, for instance, the unconscious supplies all those contents that are constellated by the conscious situation but are inhibited by conscious selection, although a knowledge of them would be indispensable for complete adaptation["Definitions," CW 6, par. 694.]
    Quote Originally Posted by http://www.nyaap.org/jung-lexicon/s
    Self-regulation of the psyche
    A concept based on the compensatory relationship between consciousness and the unconscious. (See also adaptation, compensation, neurosis, opposites and transcendent function.)


    The psyche does not merely react, it gives its own specific answer to the influences at work upon it.["ome Crucial Points in Psychoanalysis," CW 4, par. 665.]

    The process of self-regulation is going on all the time within the psyche. It only becomes noticeable when ego-consciousness has particular difficulty in adapting to external or internal reality. That is often the start of a process, proceeeding along the lines outlined in the chart, that may lead to individuation.
    The Self-regulation of the Psyche

    Difficulty of adaptation. Little progression of libido.
    Regression of energy (depression, lack of disposable energy).
    Activation of unconscious contents (fantasies, complexes, archetypal images, inferior function, opposite attitude, shadow, anima/animus, etc.). Compensation.
    Symptoms of neurosis (confusion, fear, anxiety, guilt, moods, extreme affect, etc.).
    Unconscious or half-conscious conflict between ego and contents activated in the unconscious. Inner tension. Defensive reactions.
    Activation of the transcendent function, involving the self and archetypal patterns of wholeness.
    Formation of symbols (numinosity, synchronicity).
    Transfer of energy between unconscious contents and consciousness. Enlargement of the ego, progression of energy.
    Assimilation of unconscious contents. Individuation.
    Consciousness and the unconscious seldom agree as to their contents and their tendencies. The self-regulating activities of the psyche, manifest in dreams, fantasies and synchronistic experiences, attempt to correct any significant imbalance. According to Jung, this is necessary for several reasons:


    (1) Consciousness possesses a threshold intensity which its contents must have attained, so that all elements that are too weak remain in the unconscious.

    (2) Consciousness, because of its directed functions, exercises an inhibition (which Freud calls censorship) on all incompatible material, with the result that it sinks into the unconscious.

    (3) Consciousness constitutes the momentary process of adaptation, whereas the unconscious contains not only all the forgotten material of the individual’s own past, but all the inherited behaviour traces constituting the structure of the mind [i.e., archetypes].

    (4) The unconscious contains all the fantasy combinations which have not yet attained the threshold intensity, but which in the course of time and under suitable conditions will enter the light of consciousness.["The Transcendent Function," CW 8, par. 132.]
    basically one sidedness of conscious attitude strengthens the unconscious attitude, but also pushing it more to unconsciousness. and once the unconscious attitude gets strong enough, it may erupt in unhealthy behavior and/or neurosis. this naturally brings it to consciousness, but doesent mean it would be in conscious control(which is what individuation aims for), however it is pretty crucial when learning to consciously control it, as it would be pretty hard to learn to control something you are not aware of.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

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