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  1. #1

    Default Attachment typology?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attachment_in_adults

    Secure attachment

    Securely attached people tend to agree with the following statements: "It is relatively easy for me to become emotionally close to others. I am comfortable depending on others and having others depend on me. I don't worry about being alone or having others not accept me." This style of attachment usually results from a history of warm and responsive interactions with relationship partners. Securely attached people tend to have positive views of themselves and their partners. They also tend to have positive views of their relationships. Often they report greater satisfaction and adjustment in their relationships than people with other attachment styles. Securely attached people feel comfortable both with intimacy and with independence. Many seek to balance intimacy and independence in their relationship.

    [edit] Insecure attachment

    [edit] Anxious–preoccupied attachment

    People who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment tend to agree with the following statements: "I want to be completely emotionally intimate with others, but I often find that others are reluctant to get as close as I would like. I am uncomfortable being without close relationships, but I sometimes worry that others don't value me as much as I value them." People with this style of attachment seek high levels of intimacy, approval, and responsiveness from their partners. They sometimes value intimacy to such an extent that they become overly dependent on their partners—a condition colloquially termed clinginess. Compared to securely attached people, people who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment tend to have less positive views about themselves. They often doubt their worth as a partner and blame themselves for their partners' lack of responsiveness. People who are anxious or preoccupied with attachment may exhibit high levels of emotional expressiveness, worry, and impulsiveness in their relationships.

    [edit] Dismissive–avoidant attachment

    People with a dismissive style of avoidant attachment tend to agree with these statements: "I am comfortable without close emotional relationships.", "It is very important to me to feel independent and self-sufficient", and "I prefer not to depend on others or have others depend on me." People with this attachment style desire a high level of independence. The desire for independence often appears as an attempt to avoid attachment altogether. They view themselves as self-sufficient and invulnerable to feelings associated with being closely attached to others. They often deny needing close relationships. Some may even view close relationships as relatively unimportant. Not surprisingly, they seek less intimacy with relationship partners, whom they often view less positively than they view themselves. Investigators commonly note the defensive character of this attachment style. People with a dismissive–avoidant attachment style tend to suppress and hide their feelings, and they tend to deal with rejection by distancing themselves from the sources of rejection (i.e., their relationship partners).

    [edit] Fearful–avoidant attachment

    People with losses or sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence often develop this type of attachment[10] and tend to agree with the following statements: "I am somewhat uncomfortable getting close to others. I want emotionally close relationships, but I find it difficult to trust others completely, or to depend on them. I sometimes worry that I will be hurt if I allow myself to become too close to others." People with this attachment style have mixed feelings about close relationships. On the one hand, they desire to have emotionally close relationships. On the other hand, they tend to feel uncomfortable with emotional closeness. These mixed feelings are combined with, sometimes unconscious, negative views about themselves and their partners. They commonly view themselves as unworthy of responsiveness from their partners, and they don't trust the intentions of their partners. Similarly to the dismissive–avoidant attachment style, people with a fearful–avoidant attachment style seek less intimacy from partners and frequently suppress and deny their feelings. Instead, they are much less comfortable initially expressing affection.
    To what extent do attachment styles constitute a typology matrice?

  2. #2
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attachment_in_adults



    To what extent do attachment styles constitute a typology matrice?
    Hm, I've seen people of the same Type have several different attachment styles.. so I'm not sure there's necessarily a correlation, per se.

    I'd say a lot of that would have to do with upbringing, how we're taught self value and how to value others.
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexicon View Post
    Hm, I've seen people of the same Type have several different attachment styles.. so I'm not sure there's necessarily a correlation, per se.

    I'd say a lot of that would have to do with upbringing, how we're taught self value and how to value others.
    No, I dont mean that there's any correlation between MBTI or Enneagram and attachment styles, I mean do you believe that attachment styles themselves are a typology matrice of their own.

    It does, the attachment styles theory, posit four types, secure and two insecure, one disorganised or disordered (in the childhood theory) and four in the adult theory, one secure and three insecure. Although they suggest in the wiki that attachment styles are changeable not like personality traits.

  4. #4
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    No, I dont mean that there's any correlation between MBTI or Enneagram and attachment styles, I mean do you believe that attachment styles themselves are a typology matrice of their own.

    It does, the attachment styles theory, posit four types, secure and two insecure, one disorganised or disordered (in the childhood theory) and four in the adult theory, one secure and three insecure. Although they suggest in the wiki that attachment styles are changeable not like personality traits.

    In that they're changeable, I don't really think they'd constitute a typology of their own. In a way, that's sort of defining an entire individual based on one dimension of an expressed element of their personality. When I think of a typology matrice, I think of a 'big picture' - not just fragments.
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

  5. #5
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexicon View Post
    In that they're changeable, I don't really think they'd constitute a typology of their own. In a way, that's sort of defining an entire individual based on one dimension of an expressed element of their personality. When I think of a typology matrice, I think of a 'big picture' - not just fragments.
    +100



    Found this link, kind of interesting...

    http://www.attachmenttherapy.com/adult.htm

    -Halla74
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
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  6. #6
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
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    Hmm, interesting.

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