User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 15

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    2

    Default How do you perceive your Pi function?

    What is your personality type?
    How do you observe your Pi function when it's pro-active?
    How do you observe yourself in general?
    How does it feel? What role do feelings have in your Pi?

    Additional: Please elaborate with an on function approach

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I'm asking as I consider it to be a significant pivot point in typology and I require more objective Data to round up a theory I'm making.

    EDIT: Discussions about Si and Ni are not necessary -.- I know how they are being used and what results they bring.

  3. #3
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INfj
    Enneagram
    451 sx/so
    Socionics
    ENFj Ni
    Posts
    5,651

    Default

    I try not to observe myself.

    So, I'm afraid I'm no help.
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
    4w5 5w4 1w9
    ~Torah observant, Christ inspired~
    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  4. #4
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    3,689

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dimensiomen View Post
    What is your personality type and how do you perceive your Pi function?
    How do observe yourself?

    Additional: Please elaborate with an on function approach

    Well for one, really open ended and general questions are difficult to answer. I can't say I've paid as much attention with TJs or even SFJs (possibly even ENFJs)- but I have noticed before, when questions get posted (usually about Fe) that aren't specific enough, I'm not the only INFJ who has trouble answering. Post an open ended question about Fi though and those NFPs will stretch it into 5 pages by the next day. With Ni, it really helps to know exactly why something is being asked- the more specific the better. (Or post something we don't agree with, that gives us something to work with as well.)

    So what do you mean by "a significant pivot point in typology"?
    Reality is a collective hunch. -Lily Tomlin

    5w4 sx/sp Johari / Nohari

  5. #5
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    7,823

    Default

    Pi isnt about observing self, its about observing by the subjective factor. For example Si and Se are both sensation, they perceive what comes trough senses. But with Si the sensation is sort of clouded by the subjective experience of the sensation and the decisive factor in determining whether sensation gets to consciousness or not depends on the intensity of subjective experience released by the sensation that came trough eye or ears. While with Se the determining factor is the intensity or the object, like volume etc. Volume could be decisive factor in Si too, but it would require subjective reaction to the volume. Jung said that Si is aesthetic, while Se is sensuous, and i think it captures the essence of the differences perfectly.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

  6. #6
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dimensiomen View Post
    What is your personality type and how do you perceive your Pi function?
    How do observe yourself?

    Additional: Please elaborate with an on function approach
    Not sure on my type but i'll give it a go.

    Basically I see myself as in a series of constantly changing states. Many of these are reccuring as im fairly sure they are for most people.

    I would definitely say I see the world through the lens of an Extraverted Feeler. Most of my time has been made up of gathering information about others likes and dislikes and trying to adapt myself to them so as to preserve friendly and clean relationships. (Fe)

    However, over time I have come to be at odds with this mentality, ive realised both it's limitations and it's constrictions on me. After all I cannot be friends with everyone and to come into conflict is only natural. I often therefore observe myself through a light that tries to tell me the core of what I am and why it is not necessarily a bad thing to adhere to that once in a while, ie: my own expectations rather than others.

    This would suggest a Pi function aligned with inferior Ti, since this revelation is not always of a constructive nature but im learning to try and make it one. This helps me to try and accept an unwelcome truth, rather than try to brush it under the carpet, so to speak.

    Incidentally @INTP I dont know what you think of her work and in fact quoting an authority may be a poor move here, but Lenore Thompson would disagree. I think all of her type analysis' describe developing the auxiliary to use on oneself, including secondary Pi functions, as well as on the world around you.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Joehobo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/sp
    Posts
    300

    Default

    3.14159

    Couldn't help myself!

    I'll give a serious response after I figure out what the heck you mean by Pi. (I iz noob.)

  8. #8
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    7,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
    Incidentally INTP I dont know what you think of her work and in fact quoting an authority may be a poor move here, but Lenore Thompson would disagree. I think all of her type analysis' describe developing the auxiliary to use on oneself, including secondary Pi functions, as well as on the world around you.
    i think you kinda missed the point i was making, or you misunderstood what lenore said. to put it short in other words, Si doesent perceive self, it perceives sense perceptions from external world according to how strong subjective influences they have on self.

    quote from lenores book 'personality type; an owners manual':

    When we use introverted sensation, we stabilize our immediate sense impressions by integrating them with the ones we remember and care about. We "find ourselves" in whatever is happening, because our sense perceptions are anchored by what we already know.
    and here is what jung said about Si, pretty much the same thing as lenore said, but in much more depth and with some crucial points:

    Quote Originally Posted by psychological types; introverted sensation
    Sensation, which in obedience to its whole nature is concerned with the object and the objective stimulus, also undergoes a considerable modification in the introverted attitude. It, too, has a subjective factor, for beside the object sensed there stands a sensing subject, who contributes his subjective disposition to the objective stimulus. In the introverted attitude sensation is definitely based upon the subjective portion of perception. What is meant by this finds its best illustration in the reproduction of objects in art. When, for instance, several painters undertake to paint one and the same landscape, with a sincere attempt to reproduce it faithfully, each painting will none the less differ from the rest, not merely by virtue of a more or less developed ability, but chiefly because of a different vision; there will even appear in some of the paintings a decided psychic variation, both in general mood and in treatment of colour and form. Such qualities betray a more or less influential cooperation of the subjective factor. The subjective factor of sensation is essentially the same as in the other functions already spoken of. It is an unconscious disposition, which alters the sense-perception at its very source, thus depriving it of the character of a purely objective influence. In this case, sensation is related primarily to the subject, and only secondarily to the object. How extraordinarily strong the subjective factor can be is shown most clearly in art. The ascendancy of the subjective factor occasionally achieves a complete suppression of the mere influence of the object; but none the less sensation remains sensation, although it has come to be a perception of the subjective factor, and the effect of the object has sunk to the level of a mere stimulant. Introverted sensation develops in accordance with this subjective direction. A true sense-perception certainly exists, but it always looks as though objects were not so much forcing their way into the subject in their own right as that the subject were seeing things quite differently, or saw quite other things than the rest of mankind. As a matter of fact, the subject perceives the same things as everybody else, only, he never stops at the purely objective effect, but concerns himself with the subjective perception released by the objective stimulus. Subjective perception differs remarkably from the objective. It is either not found at all in the object, or, at most, merely suggested by it; it can, however, be similar to the sensation of other men, although not immediately derived from the objective behaviour of things. It does not impress one as a mere product of consciousness—it is too genuine for that. But it makes a definite psychic impression, since elements of a higher psychic order are perceptible to it. This order, however, does not coincide with the contents of consciousness. It is concerned with presuppositions, or dispositions of the collective unconscious, with mythological images, with primal possibilities of ideas. The character of significance and meaning clings to subjective perception. It says more than the mere image of the object, though naturally only to him for whom the subjective factor has some meaning. To another, a reproduced subjective impression seems to suffer from the defect of possessing insufficient similarity with the object; it seems, therefore, to have failed in its purpose. Subjective sensation apprehends the background of the physical world rather than its surface. The decisive thing is not the reality of the object, but the reality of the subjective factor, i.e. the primordial images, which in their totality represent a psychic mirror-world. It is a mirror, however, with the peculiar capacity of representing the present contents of consciousness not in their known and customary form but in a certain sense sub specie aeternitatis, somewhat as a million-year old consciousness might see them. Such a consciousness would see the becoming and the passing of things beside their present and momentary existence, and not only that, but at the same time it would also see that Other, which was before their becoming and will be after their passing hence. To this consciousness the present moment is improbable. This is, of course, only a simile, of which, however, I had need to give some sort of illustration of the peculiar nature of introverted sensation. Introverted sensation conveys an image whose effect is not so much to reproduce the object as to throw over it a wrapping whose lustre is derived from age-old subjective experience and the still unborn future event. Thus, mere sense impression develops into the depth of the meaningful, while extraverted sensation seizes only the momentary and manifest existence of things.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

  9. #9
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,810

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    i think you kinda missed the point i was making, or you misunderstood what lenore said. to put it short in other words, Si doesent perceive self, it perceives sense perceptions from external world according to how strong subjective influences they have on self.

    quote from lenores book 'personality type; an owners manual':



    and here is what jung said about Si, pretty much the same thing as lenore said, but in much more depth and with some crucial points:
    Ah yes I misunderstood, my apologies. I was confusing what it is trained on with what it actually is in definition, sorry.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  10. #10
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dimensiomen View Post
    What is your personality type and how do you perceive your Pi function?
    How do observe yourself?

    Additional: Please elaborate with an on function approach
    Both Ni and Si are a preference for planning ahead, reviewing what has happened and considering what is known. The main difference between the two is the exact aim, but the asked us to consider our own functions, so I'll leave Si alone.

    If you could somehow isolate pure Ni, you would find that it makes no judgments of right or wrong, better or worse. It is simply a desire to understand the way things are and how they work. It needs to be coupled to a judging functions before the need to do anything with what it concludes becoomes apparent. It's only once this link has been made that the planning ahead aspect becomes evident - obviously, you can't lay plans unless you know what you want!
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] How do you experience your tertiary function?
    By Krys in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-18-2017, 12:41 AM
  2. How do you perceive your inferior function?
    By Qlip in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 06-19-2015, 10:30 PM
  3. How do you experience your inferior function?
    By onemoretime in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 10-08-2012, 07:06 PM
  4. How do YOU use your functions?
    By StephMC in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-16-2012, 04:50 AM
  5. How do you and your type dress?
    By CzeCze in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 121
    Last Post: 10-28-2009, 11:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO