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  1. #1
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    Default Which types resist the most as kids?

    Would those be P or J type kids who resist the most to what their parents/etc. tell them? I'm not entirely sure if the resistance is related to lack of showed proof or not... But I think in case the proof doesn't matter it would be Fi types, and if proof does matter, then it would be Te types (maybe Ti too?).

    By resist I mean "clean your teeth!" and the kid refuses to do so. "Take a bath!" the kid goes as far as screaming when being taken to the bath (maybe dislikes the bath ). Just two pretty rough examples to illustrate the point, however don't take them as the "this and not something else," those are just examples to illustrate the abstract idea.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Winds of Thor's Avatar
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    Maybe the spoiled types? The ones that are told they're princesses? The Tauruses? ENFJs?
    "..And the eight and final rule: If this is your first time at Fight Club, you have to fight."
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    Retired Nicki's Avatar
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    Whenever my parents told me to do anything, I demanded an explanation why and if it didn't make sense, I resisted. I think ESTPs and ENTPs would be the types who resisted the most as children though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craic View Post
    Maybe the spoiled types? The ones that are told they're princesses? The Tauruses? ENFJs?
    Makes sense, but I don't think it's type-related due to the fact that they are spoiled.

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    Senior Member Winds of Thor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Makes sense, but I don't think it's type-related due to the fact that they are spoiled.
    Right..and I was being somewhat facetious.
    "..And the eight and final rule: If this is your first time at Fight Club, you have to fight."
    'Men are meant to be with women. The rest is perversion and mental illness.'

  6. #6
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    I don't think one type would necessarily be more likely to resist than others function wise. If it was for one particular reason then yes but something can be resisted for a myriad of reasons. Would be more on an individual basis. I imagine each doing the following though I may be wrong (they shouldn't have a developed auxilary to really broaden their thought process.)

    Fi-dom kids: Not personally valuing or seeing the subjective value in a demanded course of action.
    Ti-dom kids: What they have been asked to do doesn't fit with their logical understanding of things.
    Ne-dom kids: Not happy with having to agree with what their parents think when other possibilities exist.
    Se-dom kids: Not happy with doing what they're told when there's something more interesting to do elsewhere.
    Ni-dom kids: Not happy with a level of involvement sensory-data they may have to employ for a given task / do not believe this should be happening.
    Si-dom kids: Not happy with a perceived change from the routine of what they believe normally happens.
    Fe-dom kids: Not happy if feels the instruction has made others unhappy.
    Te-dom kids: Not happy if believes the instruction isn't creating the best results.

    P.S. the above are all my impressions of each young type. Apologies if they are caricatures.

  7. #7
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    I don't think one type would necessarily be more likely to resist than others function wise. If it was for one particular reason then yes but something can be resisted for a myriad of reasons. Would be more on an individual basis. I imagine each doing the following though I may be wrong (they shouldn't have a developed auxilary to really broaden their thought process.)

    Fi-dom kids: Not personally valuing or seeing the subjective value in a demanded course of action.
    Ti-dom kids: What they have been asked to do doesn't fit with their logical understanding of things.
    Ne-dom kids: Not happy with having to agree with what their parents think when other possibilities exist.
    Se-dom kids: Not happy with doing what they're told when there's something more interesting to do elsewhere.
    Ni-dom kids: Not happy with a level of involvement sensory-data they may have to employ for a given task / do not believe this should be happening.
    Si-dom kids: Not happy with a perceived change from the routine of what they believe normally happens.
    Fe-dom kids: Not happy if feels the instruction has made others unhappy.
    Te-dom kids: Not happy if believes the instruction isn't creating the best results.

    P.S. the above are all my impressions of each young type. Apologies if they are caricatures.
    I agree that kids of all types can be resistant. Especially when their dominant function has been 'violated' in some way and they are forced to use weaker functions.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    I don't think one type would necessarily be more likely to resist than others function wise. If it was for one particular reason then yes but something can be resisted for a myriad of reasons. Would be more on an individual basis. I imagine each doing the following though I may be wrong (they shouldn't have a developed auxilary to really broaden their thought process.)

    Fi-dom kids: Not personally valuing or seeing the subjective value in a demanded course of action.
    Ti-dom kids: What they have been asked to do doesn't fit with their logical understanding of things.
    Ne-dom kids: Not happy with having to agree with what their parents think when other possibilities exist.
    Se-dom kids: Not happy with doing what they're told when there's something more interesting to do elsewhere.
    Ni-dom kids: Not happy with a level of involvement sensory-data they may have to employ for a given task / do not believe this should be happening.
    Si-dom kids: Not happy with a perceived change from the routine of what they believe normally happens.
    Fe-dom kids: Not happy if feels the instruction has made others unhappy.
    Te-dom kids: Not happy if believes the instruction isn't creating the best results.

    P.S. the above are all my impressions of each young type. Apologies if they are caricatures.
    Fi: Subjective value as in value for the one who asks?
    Ti: Interesting.
    Ne: There's always other possibilities...
    Se: Sounds like the spoiled kind.
    Ni: That sounds... Mystical. "This should not be happening!" kind of thing. I find this rather stupid, because it is the opposite of reality.
    Si: Interesting.
    Fe: Instructions usually are there to make others happy. Either way, someone will be unhappy - either the instructor or someone else, if the instruction won't be completed.
    Te: I don't think kids can grasp the concept of "best results" very well, especially when they don't know anything about the subject...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Fi: Subjective value as in value for the one who asks?
    Ti: Interesting.
    Ne: There's always other possibilities...
    Se: Sounds like the spoiled kind.
    Ni: That sounds... Mystical. "This should not be happening!" kind of thing. I find this rather stupid, because it is the opposite of reality.
    Si: Interesting.
    Fe: Instructions usually are there to make others happy. Either way, someone will be unhappy - either the instructor or someone else, if the instruction won't be completed.
    Te: I don't think kids can grasp the concept of "best results" very well, especially when they don't know anything about the subject...
    I was working with caricatures as mentioned before. I could be completely wrong on most if not pretty much all of them for all I know.

    To clarify my points:
    Fi: As in what the individual feels is good/bad or right/wrong which may differ from what the authority figure thought was right/wrong. When I was a wee little lad this was already well developed. I knew when I didn't think what I was being told to do was right or what I wanted to do.
    Ne: Parents insisting that a certain way be accepted and followed without question (probably an Si-dom/aux parent in this situation) and reprimanding the Ne user for trying to consider other avenues instead.
    Se: Perhaps spoiled, perhaps not. Could be no more spoiled than wanting to play in the park rather than going with a parent to some place or another where they would have to sit still with nothing to do.
    Ni: I don't really understand Ni. I wasn't aiming for the mystical angle, just working with the explanations of supposed Ni users I had met in my time: building a subjective, unconscious framework of reality from stored patterns that have occurred which is then synthesized into a idea of what is most likely to be true/happening probability wise. Confusion or disbelief may occur if what actually occurs was a low probability event which the Ni dismissed as "not going to happen" which could undermine a number of other long-term projections. As a result, the child resists the situation. Alternatively, they could also resist if the parent's instruction is causing the inferior Se to interfere with Ni when it's trying to focus.
    Fe: I envisioned in this one of a kid playing with a group of friends and a parent telling them they have to go home/away etc. The kid realised that their friends are unhappy/sad that the friend has to leave and that the parent is seemingly indifferent mood wise whether the kid complies or not. Valuing group harmony, the kid says no and it proceeds from there.
    Te: I had a bit of trouble with this one too. My understanding of Te (from what I read somewhere) is that it primarily adapts itself based on parameters from real-world logical structures, the more efficient or expedient the structure the more Te seeks to emulate it. If the Te-dom already has been exposed to systems they know to work yet they are being instructed by an elder to follow through a course of action which their Te says is less efficient than what they've already seen can work in their current environment (if they disobey the instruction of coure) then would they follow it? Te is my inferior function though so it's possible I have made errors in my reasoning.

    I don't know if I would be able to expand much further on the above points without literally pulling at straws!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleda View Post
    Whenever my parents told me to do anything, I demanded an explanation why and if it didn't make sense, I resisted. I think ESTPs and ENTPs would be the types who resisted the most as children though.
    No. When I became three I told my parents what to do Baby Cat's are deadly
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