User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 29

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default Reading "self-help/motivational" books

    Personally... I would never even consider reading a self-help/motivational books. Unless of course I'd have a hidden agenda, but that is very unlikely.

    I consistently noticed S types liking them... A lot. "Books about life" is what they call them. N types, however, don't seem to like them much, in my surroundings (online and offline) at least.

    SJs or SPs, they like them. STs or SFs, they like them. Why? Is this "phenomena" widespread, or is it just my surroundings?

    Would/have you read such a book? Why?

  2. #2
    WALMART
    Guest

    Default




    To provide actual input, perhaps sensor types don't put trust in their own thoughts about things, and are more apt to seek out professional opinions on various matters.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    I like that guy. We would've been friends.

  4. #4
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INtp
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    5,091

    Default

    It probably depends on the person. I know an ESTJ who despises self-help books. She sees it as all speculation that can't be proven. She also thinks the author is just writing the stuff to get your money.
    INtp
    5w6 or 9w1 sp/so/sx, I think
    Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff
    Neutral Good
    LII-Ne




  5. #5
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Personally... I would never even consider reading a self-help/motivational books. Unless of course I'd have a hidden agenda, but that is very unlikely.

    I consistently noticed S types liking them... A lot. "Books about life" is what they call them. N types, however, don't seem to like them much, in my surroundings (online and offline) at least.

    SJs or SPs, they like them. STs or SFs, they like them. Why? Is this "phenomena" widespread, or is it just my surroundings?

    Would/have you read such a book? Why?
    I would agree, but only to a point. I can't say I'm a "fan" of ANY self help book... However I've skimmed books like "four hour work week", "zen and the art of making a living", certain career oriented books, buddhist practicalities. Basically self help books that focus on happiness are pointless, agreed. Knowing a lot of facts about happiness doesn't actually make anyone happier. However career oriented self help books usually do have practical knowledge and tips. Ive had a lot of career angst growing up and I tend to read nonfiction so go figure

  6. #6
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    If I'm not sure about how to do something, I read up on it. Relationships and life skills are no different. I've read stuff about marriage, sex, parenting, dog training, putting on make-up, how to dress, co-dependence, autism, religion, personal finance, soap-making, etc. If I'm lucky, there are a few good things in a book or article, but that makes it worth it to me. I prefer not to have to make all my own mistakes myself. I'm not too proud to take short-cuts when I can get them.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Venom View Post
    I would agree, but only to a point. I can't say I'm a "fan" of ANY self help book... However I've skimmed books like "four hour work week", "zen and the art of making a living", certain career oriented books, buddhist practicalities. Basically self help books that focus on happiness are pointless, agreed. Knowing a lot of facts about happiness doesn't actually make anyone happier. However career oriented self help books usually do have practical knowledge and tips. Ive had a lot of career angst growing up and I tend to read nonfiction so go figure
    Skimming through, I did that to see what those books are about... And to be able to make fun when I want to. That falls under the "secret agenda" category.
    @cafe reading up on how to do something (how to tie my shoes, how to weld a PC case) is not self-help or motivational books.

  8. #8
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,809

    Default

    Im not sure but...do books on Jung and MBTI count?

    Jung perhaps not as he desired for people to truely know about themselves. But MBTI books...im not so sure about.

    I do know ive never read any self-help book of the kind usually straining the 'health' section of a WHSmith shop. Those with titles such as "How to master people and yourself" and "How your dog can drive your car".

    If any book has a title similar to my first example I cannot see how it could be anything less than a few thousand pages long. People cannot be mastered by a certain technique of practice, each individual is a step into someone else's mental realm and the complexities therein, even within the most 'simple' of people, are not something to breeze over lightly.

    Of course there are fairly objective techniques that can work on people, collective delusions, dissonances and biases, but even so there are always those who throw a nice bit of grit in such systems.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  9. #9
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    937 so/sx
    Posts
    6,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Personally... I would never even consider reading a self-help/motivational books. Unless of course I'd have a hidden agenda, but that is very unlikely.

    I consistently noticed S types liking them... A lot. "Books about life" is what they call them. N types, however, don't seem to like them much, in my surroundings (online and offline) at least.

    SJs or SPs, they like them. STs or SFs, they like them. Why? Is this "phenomena" widespread, or is it just my surroundings?

    Would/have you read such a book? Why?

    This anecdotally doesn't seem to be the case in my environment.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  10. #10
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Skimming through, I did that to see what those books are about... And to be able to make fun when I want to. That falls under the "secret agenda" category.
    @cafe reading up on how to do something (how to tie my shoes, how to weld a PC case) is not self-help or motivational books.
    Whatever you need to tell yourself to make yourself feel superior. I'd rather admit my ignorance and take steps to stop being ignorant, but to each his/her own.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

Similar Threads

  1. Face-Reading Personality Self-Test (For Fun)
    By tibby in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-01-2017, 04:55 PM
  2. Self-help = Less Thinking
    By ThatsWhatHeSaid in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 03-23-2010, 06:57 PM
  3. [ENFP] Self Help and Success materials
    By TSDesigner in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-30-2009, 09:03 PM
  4. The self-help "phenomenon"
    By mysavior in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-16-2008, 10:54 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO