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  1. #11
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    Thank you for your responses. Perhaps I am a highly sensitive person and an extravert. I related most to @Pseudo 's response, especially before the age of 22.

    Recently, I have been nurturing that aspect of myself and have been feeling as though life is unending visualaffective poetry much like when I was 5. However, I am also highly resilient to stressors yet feel very sensitive to stimuli. I feel as though.. I have learnt to integrate almost any experience into myself in a positive manner. I feel as though it is my genuine self.
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  2. #12
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    I doubt this is true.
    Well funnily enough I think there has been a lot of correlation and more than a few studies put into that specific subject. However id have to spend some time looking for that data.

    But in my experience it rings true. Introverts do tend to come off as more intelligent. When you have extensive vs depth....well it's not really a competition.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

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    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
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  3. #13
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
    Well funnily enough I think there has been a lot of correlation and more than a few studies put into that specific subject. However id have to spend some time looking for that data.

    But in my experience it rings true. Introverts do tend to come off as more intelligent. When you have extensive vs depth....well it's not really a competition.
    I don't know. I was just in a little discussion with my son who's viewed almost every documentary on Netflix, and he remembers it. I feel sorta stupid in comparison.
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  4. #14
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    I don't know. I was just in a little discussion with my son who's viewed almost every documentary on Netflix, and he remembers it. I feel sorta stupid in comparison.
    But memorising things alone isn't anything to do with intelligence as such, it's how you use that knowledge, at least this is my view.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  5. #15
    Junior Member Hemd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    I wonder how my introvert brethren and sistren would process the idea of introverts as sort of a bellwether of experience. I think introverts tend to have much more highly interconnected brains than extraverts and this makes them very sensitive to changes in stimuli in real time. Also, it explains their intelligence and tendency to feel overwhelmed in situations that others find normal. I can provide links to information supporting these correlations if you wish, but I'm much more interested in hearing how you experience things subjectively.
    I'm with you on this. Introverts react more strongly to stimulation or arousal (not sexually meant) from the outside. Extraverts on the other side don't react so strongly on stimulation. Therefore they seek more stimulation and arousal from the outside. You could also say thats why they are extraverted (because they are seeking more stimulation).

    I've read some scientific studies on this, but i can also confirm it from a subjective, personal point. Beeing more introverted, there are times where i'm actively seeking stimulation from the outside, but mostly i'm content with my own thoughts.
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  6. #16
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    I'm not understanding the premise that Introverts are more sensitive to outside stimuli. Are you referring to a very specific type of stimuli? A specific MBTI type of introvert? I mean, I know INTPs where I could change my outfit 3 times daily and he wouldn't notice. Hell, an INTx friend came over yesterday and didn't seem to even notice the two normally threatening drunk guys hanging out on the stoop from next door. That's pretty stimulating stimuli.

  7. #17
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    I'm not understanding the premise that Introverts are more sensitive to outside stimuli. Are you referring to a very specific type of stimuli? A specific MBTI type of introvert? I mean, I know INTPs where I could change my outfit 3 times daily and he wouldn't notice. Hell, an INTx friend came over yesterday and didn't seem to even notice the two normally threatening drunk guys hanging out on the stoop from next door. That's pretty stimulating stimuli.
    Studies have shown that introverts have stronger physical reactions to physical stimulation (for example, lemon juice generates a stronger salivation response in introverts), and tend to seek out less stimulating external environments. Another model is that introverts have a higher baseline of neurological activity, so to be alert and engaged they need less external stimulation than extraverts do (which may be one reason why extraverts tend to need more background noise when studying). The amount of external stimulation an extravert needs to concentrate (not be bored/fall asleep) may be overstimulating for an introvert (too noisy, distracting, chaotic).

    INTPs (at least according to Nardi) tend to detach from external input in order to logically process and analyze. This means they may be particularly prone to being unaware of their external surroundings and emotional state (and one reason why they may be among the worst listeners, since they tend to detach to analyze and verify the first few words out of someone's mouth).

  8. #18
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    In my experience, it's true.

    If I do something, something small, only other introverts will notice it...or at least show signs of noticing it.

    For example. If I'm with a group of people and I duck out for a bit for some air, when I come back, those who notice are almost always introverts.

    Or, if I have a problem...like I'm looking for a bathroom, or a glass of water...and I'm trying not to make a bother of myself in the process, typically another introvert will come over and help me out. The extroverts are usually busy talking to other people.

    I don't know if this is what is meant, but if it is, yeah, my experience confirms it.

    As for introverts being "tuning forks" or "bellweather?", you'd have to elaborate.

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